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Results tagged with Search options user 1547

This tag is for questions about the differences in the meaning of two words.

16
votes
To me, impel has a sense of motion/pushing, while compel is more of an obligation. Think of impulse vs. compulsion. There's also a difference in origin: with impel, the primary force comes from with …
answered Dec 15 '10 by Marthaª
8
votes
The choice between wreath and garland is simple: a wreath is round, while a garland is a long string. A laurel wreath is a specific type of wreath, made of bay leaves. It is generally intended to be …
answered May 12 '11 by Marthaª
4
votes
An incident is a single distinct event - one occurrence of something that can happen more than once. It is often unpleasant and/or unexpected. Issue has lots of meanings. Given the other words you'r …
answered Dec 7 '10 by Marthaª
2
votes
Curt usually refers specifically to speech, while brusque is more general, referring to manner and behavior as well as speech. Also, a "curt reply" is a bit more rude than a brusque one.
answered Dec 3 '10 by Marthaª
3
votes
is one of usage: usually, you say something truthfully, but admit something honestly. But all of these connotation differences are so slight that it is very easy to come up with counterexamples. The …
answered Dec 15 '10 by Marthaª
5
votes
with stooping under a burden on one's back, a hawker is technically distinguished from a peddler by use of a horse and cart or a van. Note that whatever the differences, they're all pretty vague, and in most cases (especially modernly) peddler and hawker can be used as exact synonyms. …
answered Nov 22 '11 by Marthaª
7
votes
onetime, one-time: former, previous, erstwhile, quondam. So "a onetime commissioner of New York" was a commissioner at some point in the past, but no longer holds that office. I usually see this m …
answered May 6 '11 by Marthaª
2
votes
I most often see intern used to mean medical resident in first year of residency, i.e. fresh out of medical school; but it can be used for any temporary training position. An intern can be paid or unp …
answered Apr 14 '11 by Marthaª
5
votes
Fluctuate = vary with time. Think graph, chart. Teeter: (1) go back and forth (between the same two things/values). Think teeter-totter. (2) be on the verge of something - the current little wiggles/ …
answered Nov 25 '10 by Marthaª
6
votes
I think you were on the right track when you mentioned it might be a question of register: to me, nowadays is old-fashioned in a sort of folksy way, rather than a "we're not that exact anymore" archai …
answered Dec 20 '13 by Marthaª
27
votes
In practice, there isn't much difference: you could arguably pick just one of the terms and use it to describe both types of rhetorical substitution. (I like metonymy: it's easier to spell, more spell …
answered Mar 8 '11 by Marthaª
8
votes
The difference, in so far as there is one at all, lays with how much the speaker agrees with the obligation. I think. You should go implies that the speaker (as well as possibly other people) thinks …
answered Nov 12 '10 by Marthaª
6
votes
5answers
My boss just floored me with a doozy of an assertion: he had me change someone's password, which contained the word "muslin", because "you can't go calling people Muslims in this day and age". Yeah, …
asked May 3 '12 by Marthaª
6
votes
Drivel is a type of nonsense: it's generally spoken, usually at length, and it's probably deadly boring. It's different from "babble" in that the person saying it is at least trying to pretend it make …
answered Nov 28 '10 by Marthaª
13
votes
Orange is one of the newest colors, in that in most languages, it was still considered merely a shade of a different color (red or yellow) up until recently[1]. My favorite example of this is the pigm …
answered Nov 28 '10 by Marthaª

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