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This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

2
votes
It depends on what you want to mean by "tense". If, as highly educated people have always agreed, "tense" is a precise term for a finite inflected verb form, then there are precisely two tenses in Mo …
answered Nov 19 '14 by John Lawler
3
votes
Will is a modal auxiliary verb, and all modal auxiliary verbs must be followed by an infinitive verb form (without to). Since compile is an infinitive form, while compiles is not, the second example …
answered May 7 '14 by John Lawler
2
votes
I will arrange for the manuscript to be sent on to you. I will arrange that the manuscript will be send to you in time. I will make sure of the manuscript to be sent to you in time. …
answered Sep 23 '13 by John Lawler
10
votes
No. You're conflating two idioms with far: By far modifies comparatives and superlatives, and indicates that the degree to which they exceed other compared things is very, very great. This is the be …
answered Dec 16 '11 by John Lawler
4
votes
Both the sentence presented I already have two stamps drawn. and the one Irene presented I have already drawn two stamps. are completely grammatical, and mean the same thing. They are not, …
answered Jan 15 '12 by John Lawler
6
votes
First of all, S + V + O + Adj + to Inf + O is not a single construction. It is a string that can be the result of a large number of possible derivations. Second, everything in such constructio …
answered Oct 16 '12 by John Lawler
3
votes
Each method has features in which context to use it. No, it's not grammatical. Nor does it make any sense. It's a garden path ending in a trackless maze. The way to tell this is to try to unwind …
answered Dec 9 '11 by John Lawler
5
votes
I have noticed that sentences starting with a [Marker] + to + Infinitive pattern are very common in Asian Englishes, like some Wh-Questions like ones often posed here on ELU.SE How to distinguish i …
answered Mar 20 '12 by John Lawler
3
votes
Possible doesn't work the same way as impossible with respect to Tough-Movement. That's the rule that's involved in John is easy to please. which comes from For Indef to please John is easy. …
answered Oct 16 '14 by John Lawler
53
votes
No, the -(t)ion derivational suffix can't be applied to update. Derivations are almost all irregular, and restricted in the words they can appear on. Since update is a modern word, it follows the mod …
answered May 18 '12 by John Lawler
3
votes
Yes. However, in doing so, be warned that you are also a.) promising to return, soon; b.) promising to call as soon as you return. (where as soon as you return means within 1/10th of the time …
answered Mar 14 '12 by John Lawler
5
votes
Both essentially and in theory are hedges. Hedges are parenthetical words or phrases that modify the meaning of a sentence. Essentially, they're handwaving, used to cover one's ignorance or unwillingn …
answered Mar 19 '14 by John Lawler
9
votes
Absolute(ly) is an interesting predicate; it has a semantic restriction to polar extremes. That is, it can modify a noun phrase, verb phrase, clause, or adjunct that represents some extreme end of a …
answered May 28 '12 by John Lawler
5
votes
As Gary's Student has pointed out, in the simplified example Maneuvering the tanker is a challenge. the subject of the sentence is maneuvering the tanker; in order to be a subject, this must be a …
answered May 24 '14 by John Lawler
5
votes
In answer to #1: No. Unlike allow, which otherwise means pretty much the same thing, let is a verb that requires an infinitive without to,. The following constructions are grammatical: A will (n …
answered May 14 '12 by John Lawler

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