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Results tagged with Search options user 15264

This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

9
votes
1) I can't get any sleep 2) I can get no sleep 3) I can't get no sleep (1) and (3) mean exactly the same thing; (1) is standard, while (3) is used only in dialects of English that have negative con …
answered Dec 29 '11 by alcas
3
votes
On is the only acceptable preposition here; "call me at my cell" (or in, to, with, etc.) is wrong. However, if you are specifying the number, you can use at: You can reach me at (555) 555-5555. Also …
answered Dec 8 '11 by alcas
9
votes
Grammatically there is nothing wrong with it. And coordinates two of the same type of phrase; am and admire are verbs, so you're just coordinating two verb phrases: XXX is a project I [[admire] an …
answered Dec 16 '11 by alcas
-2
votes
I think there is a slight difference in meaning: solution of indicates that some set of solutions is known to exist, while solution to reflects no such knowledge. Consider these examples: A. I hav …
answered Oct 22 '12 by alcas
32
votes
7answers
I have seen uses of must that appear to be in the simple past tense. Sometimes these seem grammatical, but sometimes not. Examples that help illustrate my confusion: He knew he must go to New York …
asked Dec 8 '11 by alcas