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Results tagged with Search options user 14073

This tag is for questions related to definitions and nuances of meaning of a word or phrase.

2
votes
Afford is used here in the sense of tolerate the burden of. For example, we might say that we cannot afford to buy this automobile. This means the financial burden would be too much. In your first ex …
answered Feb 2 '12 by MetaEd
3
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The word dehumidifier does not have the same meaning as the word heater. Now, practically speaking, a typical dehumidifier does not significantly heat the room. It transfers heat from the air into …
answered Nov 29 '11 by MetaEd
3
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You can certainly write “there was no red meat in his talk (proposal)” and be correctly understood to be criticizing the lack of substance. The term red meat more often has a culinary meaning
answered Aug 29 '12 by MetaEd
3
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To "put the idea out of your head" or "out of your mind" means to forget it. So your second expression is closer to what you mean.
answered Jan 16 '12 by MetaEd
4
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Yes, escape is often used (with to) in the context of a holiday trip. You can find many examples here. Also, the sense you found in Macmillan can also be found in WordNet: (v) escape, get away (re …
answered Jul 26 '12 by MetaEd
5
votes
Dilated pupils or heavy lids are not a part of the definition of “bedroom eyes”. More generally, there is no one specific physical aspect that is essential to he meaning of the expression “bedroom …
answered Sep 5 '12 by MetaEd
0
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refers to these same duties as “apparent” (that is, supposed without proof) and goes on to say that practitioners’ real duties are different than what they might presume. Thus context makes the meaning clear. …
answered Feb 16 '14 by MetaEd
1
vote
. amateur "lover of," from L. amatorem (nom. amator) "lover," agent noun from amatus, pp. of amare "to love" (see Amy). Meaning "dabbler" (as opposed to professional) is from 1786. As an adjective, by 1838. —Online Etymology Dictionary …
answered Sep 5 '12 by MetaEd
4
votes
No, not published little by little. It was written in the jail in bits and pieces, assembled, and then published: first in part, then in full. In King’s preface, when he says “the letter was continue …
answered Sep 28 '12 by MetaEd
2
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The subtext of a work is the work’s implied but unspoken ideas. Subtext was originally an acting term.¹ Examples of subtext include subtle social criticisms implied by the text using ambiguous or symb …
answered Jan 4 '12 by MetaEd
0
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Appeal here means “a request or reference to some person or authority for a decision, corroboration, judgment, etc.” (From dictionary.com, sense 2.) At the expense of here means “to the detriment of” …
answered Oct 27 '11 by MetaEd
2
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Low in this context means unfair or dishonest.¹ American Heritage Dictionary Of Idioms says low blow was first attested around 1950, and means an unfair attack, alluding “to the illegal practice of h …
answered Jul 27 '12 by MetaEd
10
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Webster’s own understanding of the word patronage can be found in a speech he made in 1835: “The most striking demonstration of the increase of executive authority ... is the use of the power of p …
answered Jan 26 '12 by MetaEd
0
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This is a tale about how a story changes as it is passed from person to person. One hears but does not hear perfectly because one cannot always pay perfect attention.
answered May 19 '12 by MetaEd
0
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virtual Virtual means “apparent, but not in fact”. Sometimes it means “not in fact but nearly so”. Examples: virtual memory – apparently (to the program) but not in fact the physical memory of the …
answered Jul 25 '12 by MetaEd

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