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This tag is for questions seeking an idiom that fits a meaning. If you're also seeking a phrase, see the "phrase-requests" tag too.

0
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Those who wish to take advantage of a situation smell blood in the water. This idiom refers to the idea that if another ocean animal is wounded and bleeding, then sharks will be able to smell the blo …
answered Apr 2 '18 by cobaltduck
10
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Your situation is like Schrödinger's Cat, you don't know whether it is alive or dead until you open the box. Marriage and Brexit are both good examples of the Cat, we won't know for sure until more o …
answered Jul 20 '16 by cobaltduck
9
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It isn't a proverb so much as an idiom, but I will offer cheaters never prosper or sometimes just cheats never prosper. If you cheat people, they will not continue to do business with you, and s …
answered Mar 11 '16 by cobaltduck
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I have used the word flow, in the psychology sense, to describe this sensation. It describes not just the immersion in the task, but the emotional connection to it at deep level that the outside worl …
answered May 30 '14 by cobaltduck
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I like this one: Its bark was worse than its bite. Here's a link.
answered Nov 4 '15 by cobaltduck
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Consider the expression Pyrrhic Victory, named for an ancient King whose army defeated Rome, at the loss of almost the entire army. This is sometimes stated as "winning the battle but losing the war." …
answered Nov 4 '15 by cobaltduck
22
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14answers
In my corner of the world, the two exressions given in the accepted answer to this question have become conflated. Now, to "have a bee up one's butt" is to have a sudden and obsessive need to do some …
asked Dec 23 '15 by cobaltduck
0
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There is a technical term consequentialism, known better by the idiom the ends justify the means. The concept holds that an action should be judged not by the inherent rightness or wrongness of the a …
answered Aug 10 '16 by cobaltduck
30
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You are caught between a rock and a hard place. Meaning, you are facing a decision, and feel that all of your choices will lead to difficulties. Note that the same link offers similar expressions "b …
answered Jan 25 '16 by cobaltduck
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There is one that is similar, even if not quite identical, and that is "bite the hand that feeds you." The Free Dictionary describes it as: to severely criticize the person or organization that helps …
answered Aug 23 '16 by cobaltduck
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I normally try to cite good sources here, but for this one the best I can do is... As seen on a poster: A picture is worth a thousand words, but memories are priceless. Less directly related is …
answered Feb 19 '16 by cobaltduck
12
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English has separate idioms for never versus rare/ long time. For never, you could use the construct "Cartman will pay back Kyle right after << insert impossible event here >>" where the event can b …
answered Apr 7 '16 by cobaltduck
6
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In addition to the other answers, I want to add the Streisand Effect, even though it is not a complete answer to your question. The concept is named for an attempt by singer and actress Barbara Strei …
answered Apr 13 '18 by cobaltduck
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Here are a few suggestions: Acquiescence - accept, agree, or allow something to happen by staying silent or by not arguing Resignation - the feeling that something unpleasant is going to happen and …
answered Feb 19 '13 by cobaltduck
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Among the other great suggestions, I'll add: We have a cornucopia full of X. From the second definition at Merriam-Webster: a great amount or source of something.
answered Feb 3 '16 by cobaltduck

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