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This tag is for questions about whether something obeys the rules of grammar in English. The question must INCLUDE THE SPECIFIC GRAMMATICAL CONCERN. If your question is about grammar itself, please use the "grammar" tag.

2
votes
Let's look at this logically. "Prefer" means "to like better or value more highly" (according to Collins English Dictionary). So "I prefer neither" means that I do not like one better than the other, …
answered Jan 8 '13 by Jay
1
vote
I think it's most often used with something following about who this particular child was or what he did. For example, "There was some kid in the classroom who stole the teacher's answer key" or "Ther …
answered Nov 14 '11 by Jay
2
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It's fairly common to use an adjective that indicates a number or quantity while omitting the noun as understood, when the context makes it clear what the noun is. "We had hundreds of customers in the …
answered Jul 30 '12 by Jay
0
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Apparently an edit brought this back to the top of the stack from 10 months ago, but as long as it's here, a passing thought ... The question brings up some fairly subtle nuances. If you said, "You' …
answered Jan 25 '12 by Jay
2
votes
"Rain" can be either transitive or intransitive. In this case it is transitive. In your "fell" example, "a great distance" is not the object of the verb, but an adverbial phrase. Consider the sentenc …
answered Sep 10 '12 by Jay
2
votes
It is grammatically incorrect, because the clause has no subject. Of course it is not essential to always be strictly grammatically correct. People often violate the rules for effect. The problem is w …
answered Oct 6 '11 by Jay
10
votes
They mean two different things. "Only write the answer" means write it and do nothing else with it. Depending on the context, this might mean "write it, but don't speak it out loud". Or for example i …
answered Nov 4 '11 by Jay
2
votes
In formal writing, the pronoun should technically be the same case as the noun or pronoun in the original sentence. For example, if someone says, "He gave a book to me", you might say, "Me, too". But …
answered Sep 11 '12 by Jay
0
votes
"Any more" goes with "not". The standard construction is, "This is not X any more." You can add additional clauses, like "This is not X to Y any more" in your example, but you can't take pieces away a …
answered Apr 4 '12 by Jay
0
votes
If a sentence is at all ambiguous, it is always a good idea to add words to clarify the meaning. Even if a sentence is not technically ambiguous, in the sense that if someone reads it carefully they s …
answered Oct 1 '12 by Jay
1
vote
As others have noted, it is completely correct to say, "You evacuated me from the building." I just checked two dictionaries and both list "to withdraw inhabitants from a threatened area" (with slight …
answered May 23 '12 by Jay
6
votes
Yes, they are correct. "Read" can refer to the action performed by a human being when looking by text, or it can refer to the text itself or the medium containing the text. I read the words, "Hell …
answered Jun 8 '12 by Jay
6
votes
Hmm, I don't know that it's wrong to qualify "never" with a time frame. Like Shakespeare: "Never since the middle summer's spring / Met we on hill, in dale, forest, or mead ..." (Midsummer Nights Dre …
answered May 15 '12 by Jay
2
votes
The first is okay. The second is wrong. "Be" serves no purpose in the sentence. Better still would be, "If he had seen you ...", as this avoids the odd shift from passive voice to active voice.
answered Jun 20 '12 by Jay
2
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If the name of the site is "Addenbrooke's Site", then it is a proper noun. If the site has some other name, but it happens to be run by some person or organization called Addenbrooke, then that is not …
answered Feb 9 '12 by Jay

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