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This tag is for questions about morphology and syntax, the two elements of grammar. DO NOT USE THIS TAG IF YOUR QUESTION IS ABOUT WHETHER SOMETHING SPECIFIC IS GRAMMATICAL. For such cases use the 'grammaticality' tag. Also do not use this for punctuation or spelling (orthography); those are not about grammar, and they have their own tags.

2
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The following is incorrect: Share me the details. Share me your details. The following ways are correct: Share with me the details. Share with me your details. Share the details with me. Share y …
answered Jan 8 '16 by Benjamin Harman
1
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No, you're not right. Sorry. First, I don't think it's using "good" as a noun but an adjective. I believe it's saying something like, "Nature is good (tasty) in a cup." Second, even if it were usi …
answered Jan 7 '16 by Benjamin Harman
1
vote
greater expectation of success. Here are some links that substantiate that "try and" is in use: http://www.dailywritingtips.com/try-to-vs-try-and/ http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar
answered Jan 13 '16 by Benjamin Harman
1
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I have had that experience I've experienced that. To me, there is a great deal of overlap in the meaning of those two sentences, so they could be or even often would be used to mean the same thing, …
answered Mar 31 by Benjamin Harman
5
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Yes, it is. "Stiffening" is the present participle of the verb "to stiffen." The present participle of nearly all verbs can be used as adjectives. http://www.edufind.com/english-grammar/ing-forms/ …
answered Jan 5 '16 by Benjamin Harman
0
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of "to use." The participle can be used as part of an adjective phrase generally put after the noun it qualifies, e.g., "The boy stood at the gate is John." Read more at: http://www.englishpractice.com/grammar/participle/#sMLA2LA0slgbmP1y.99 …
answered Jan 10 '16 by Benjamin Harman
1
vote
"My" is the determiner in the sentence. In English, the possessives my, your, etc. are used without articles and so can be regarded as determiners. "Plenty of" is a predeterminer, which you can find …
answered Jan 9 '16 by Benjamin Harman
0
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Using "something" as a noun is informal, which is what you are doing when you say, "a something." As such, if this is for any formal communication, you would write, "something specific." Otherwise, …
answered Jan 11 '16 by Benjamin Harman
0
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You'd use the future periphrastic mood: "If she were to have a daughter one day..." The future periphrastic mood can also be expressed as follows: "If she were going to have a daughter one d …
answered Apr 1 by Benjamin Harman
2
votes
Yes, it makes perfect sense. It's a gerund phrase. When you say "having" in this context, you are using the present participle "having" as a gerund. A gerund is the noun form of a verb. By takin …
answered Jan 9 '16 by Benjamin Harman
2
votes
There is no rule against using the same preposition in consecutive prepositional phrases: I was in my suit in a car in a hold in a boat in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. I'm hard pressed to …
answered Jan 15 '16 by Benjamin Harman
0
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It is correct to use adjectives formed from present participles (verb+ing) with the present simple tense as you've demonstrated. She is stunning. It is also correct to add "to be" as you have. …
answered Jan 9 '16 by Benjamin Harman
2
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linguistic oddities are not exclusive to the field of law and its jargon. It is quite usual for an industry or a field to have special words and grammar that is understood by its members and a few others in …
answered Jan 4 '16 by Benjamin Harman
0
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applies the same grammar I used when I didn't put any punctuation around the word "error" in the last sentence or this one. Punctuation around quoted speech or phrases depends on how it fits into the … always need a comma: My father always said, "Be careful what you wish for." Sources: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/marks/quotation.htm http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp http://www.thepunctuationguide.com/quotation-marks.html#adjacentpunctuation …
answered Jan 16 '16 by Benjamin Harman
1
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It's not limited to Great Britain. We do it sometimes with some words in American English, too. It is not, for example, uncommon to see "an history," particularly in academia. I remember my high sch …
answered 1 hour ago by Benjamin Harman

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