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This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

4
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This is a metaphorical usage of the word prepare. Naturally the hurricane does not plan or get ready for anything; but the meaning is still clear: Hurricane will soon hit east coast. The metaphor ca …
answered Aug 24 '11 by Daniel
4
votes
Dictionary.com can answer your question: 2. to counterbalance; offset; be equivalent to: He compensated his homely appearance with great personal charm. Imagine scales balancing your large ego o …
answered Oct 5 '11 by Daniel
3
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Between these options, you should definitely choose the infinitive here: To be honest it sounds like she’s got the perfect relationship, in her eyes, going right now. So I don’t think you should b …
answered Jul 22 '11 by Daniel
15
votes
It's not correct. The image you have there was made to be tongue-in-cheek (at the expense of the US government). It's a play on the meme All your base are belong to us. As you say, if you remove the …
answered Mar 24 '12 by Daniel
6
votes
Met a problem is a right usage of meet: Meet: 1. to come upon; come into the presence of; encounter: I would meet him on the street at unexpected moments. That said, encountered a problem or r …
answered Dec 21 '11 by Daniel
4
votes
Etymonline says: twitter (v.) late 14c., twiteren, in reference to birds, of imitative origin (cf. O.H.G. zwizziron, Ger. zwitschern, Dan. kvidre, O.Swed. kvitra). The noun meaning "condition of …
answered Sep 1 '11 by Daniel
2
votes
When X crowds out Y, X is replacing Y by pushing Y out. In this case, pickpocketing (etc.) replaced theft of animals (etc.) since it became more popular and hence more common.
answered Aug 19 '11 by Daniel
4
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It is not a particle phrase. A particle phrase is a phrase consisting of the particle associated with the phrasal verb, the particle's modifiers (if any), and (though some do not include this) the di …
answered Dec 11 '11 by Daniel
15
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Killing time is a common idiom for this kind of activity. Example (from Dictionary.com definition 51 of time): While I was waiting, I killed time counting the cars on the freight trains. Sometimes i …
answered Sep 12 '11 by Daniel
7
votes
The problem in both your examples is that zoom in/out isn't transitive and therefore shouldn't be used with a direct object. I'd say: If you can't see all the markers on the map, zoom out. You …
answered Mar 21 '12 by Daniel
20
votes
Coincide works well. It's what I would use: The graphs of f(x) and g(x) coincide between x=2 and x=6. Dictionary.com's first definition is: to occupy the same place in space, the same point …
answered Oct 6 '11 by Daniel
6
votes
The word is quell. You'd certainly have found it by googling or dictionary-searching if it weren't for the fact that the acronym QUEL is all that comes up when you try to google "quel" or search a di …
answered Aug 26 '11 by Daniel
4
votes
The hyphen is misleading: They will be able to better tailor the letter... It means: They will be able to tailor the letter better... (Tailor means adapt/suit, and the adverb better is oft …
answered Nov 1 '11 by Daniel
6
votes
Dictionary.com defines bootstrap (v) as: –verb (used with object) 6. to help (oneself) without the aid of others: She spent years bootstrapping herself through college. It likely derives fro …
answered Jul 21 '11 by Daniel
11
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They are both good English, and the difference in actual practice is very slight. I don't remember means that I once knew, but now I do not. This is less committal, since it sounds as if I am not ne …
answered Mar 14 '12 by Daniel

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