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Results for gerund infinitive
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0answers
Can a gerund and infinitive be together in a single sentence? It's disheartening to see him suffer like that. vs To see him suffer like that is disheartening. …
asked Dec 22 '17 by Olubodun Timmy
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3answers
Does "feel committed to" require an infinitive or gerund complement? For example, which of the following is grammatical? I feel committed to following up on that. I feel committed to follow up on that. …
asked Jan 10 '13 by wondersz1
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1answer
I am having trouble using gerund/infinitive phrases. In this sentence, which is correct the infinitive or the gerund: Clearly, more attention – and investment – is needed on leveraging/to leverage … the role of intermediate small- and medium-sized towns. Similarly "assist" requires a gerund and not the infinitive: assist in formulating and not assist to formulate. What is the reasoning. And where can I find more information on this. Many thanks! …
asked Jun 24 '16 by Mary351
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1answer
Can I know which one is correct. I am confused about when to use gerund/infinitive in a sentence. My brother suggested to me to get a job in bank My brother suggested to me getting a job in bank. Can anyone explain the concept of gerund/infinitive in some detail if possible? …
asked May 1 by sharan kumar
-1
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1answer
TIL: the phrase "fail in + noun/gerund" means: to not be successful in an attempt to do something. and the phrase "fail to + infinitive" means: leave something undone According to the …
asked Nov 5 '18 by user322925
-1
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2answers
I framed two sentences, one using infinitive and another using gerund. Which of the two sounds more correct? Although the app will continue to occupy the storage space, it will, at least, not …
asked Dec 10 '15 by Ashish Singh
2
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1answer
There are few questions and answer on the choice of gerund versus infinitive. From what I understand, when conveying a purpose the infinitive should be used: I use my key in order to open the … English lesson book: "Use similes to describing the animals here below." Could you please confirm what should follow "(in order) to": the gerund or the infinitive? …
asked Dec 16 '12 by Benjamin
2
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1answer
Some verbs such as advise, recommend, permit, allow, require, forbid are used in sentences either gerund or infinitive. For instance, The plumber recommended buying a new water heater. The … plumber recommended me to buy a new water heater. I wonder that in the second sentence, is it appropriate to use the gerund form (buying) instead of the infinitive. What about other verbs …
asked Jun 10 '18 by ofenerci
1
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1answer
wretch! said they, the bird to slay, That made the breeze to blow! As far as I understand, the bird to slay means an act of slaying the bird, am I correct? Are Noun + Infinitive and Gerund + Noun …
asked Apr 12 '17 by olegst
0
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1answer
I use Grammarly Chrome extension to validate my texts in English. And with some sentences I keep seeing the error message "Infinitive instead of gerund". I'm not sure if this is an appropriate error … installation requires having a certain expertise. For some reason, I don't like how the suggestion sounds. And I think I met with a similar use of an infinitive used after a verb before. …
asked Mar 3 '16 by csandanov
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1answer
, but actually the results for both are so little (47:25) that I wouldn't say that this gives any conclusion. Anyhow, my question is if there's a subtle difference between using gerund or infinitive … ? And can anyone explain why all sources (that discuss gerund vs infinitive) state that endure is followed by a gerund, although infinitive is possible as well? …
asked Jan 27 '14 by Em1
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1answer
I have searched both Google and this site. According to Collins, predispose can accept both to + infinitive and to + gerund. I find this questionable, but there it is. Other than that, I can think … of approach: We need a new approach to win customers. We need a new approach to winning customers. Actually, in this case, it seems the infinitive works because of "need" and the gerund works because …
asked Apr 5 '18 by Chuckk Hubbard
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1answer
How does one know when to use a gerund or an infinitive? states a 90% rule, but I'm more interested in the remaining 10%. This British Council page states Sorry, there isn’t a rule. You have to … . My hobby is listening to music. Why does one take a gerund, and the other an infinitive? What is the rule? …
asked May 29 '16 by Gnubie
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1answer
I've been searching Google but the corpus does not really help this time. Are all the examples below correct and idiomatic? I will appreciate it if you support your answers with rules and not just nat …
asked Jun 16 '16 by M-b
2
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2answers
it ending''? From the same category I've got ''to see him leave'' rather than ''to see him leaving''. Why is this use of infinitive ? …
asked Jul 27 '15 by Antonio Nanu

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