All Questions

5,611 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
12
votes
0answers
204 views

Derivation of a slang greeting in Yorkshire

When I was young, int] the West Riding of Yorkshire 1942 to 1960 You would greet an acquaintance thus: "Aye up serry". I believe older residents of the village of Kiveton Park still use the phrase, or ...
10
votes
1answer
753 views

Southern Dialect: Word for a time of day?

I remember reading a story somewhere that a Southerner wrote about one of his life experiences. He mentioned that in the region he lived there was a time of day that cooled off a large amount in less ...
9
votes
5answers
738 views

Is 'who' here a relative word or an interrogative pronoun?

(1) That's a big part of who I am. (2) When that day comes if you don't like who you are, you're done. At first blush, the who's in (1) and (2) seem to be relative words in the fused ...
8
votes
2answers
272 views

Analyzing 'genitive/accusative + V-ing phrase (gerund-participle phrase)' as different constructions

(1) I regretted [his leaving the firm]. (2) I regretted [him leaving the firm]. (3) I regretted [leaving the firm]. (4) He didn’t bother [giving me a copy]. Regarding the above ...
7
votes
1answer
235 views

How tran­si­tiv­ity is de­fined in CGEL

This ques­tion is specif­i­cally for those who are fa­mil­iar with the 2002 edi­tion of The Cam­bridge Gram­mar of the English Lan­guage by Hud­dle­ston and Pul­lum. The book has this pas­sage at ...
7
votes
2answers
133 views

How to elucidate a *speciously* threefold “correlative comparative” in written form

Consider this sentence: The more complex a law, the more difficult it is to comprehend, the easier it becomes for the experts to evade it. As RegDwigнt has pointed out ...the chain is not ...
6
votes
0answers
134 views

You two are shallow. [fused-head NP?]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 410) defines "Fused-head NPs" as follows: Fused-head NPs are those where the head is combined with a dependent function that in ordinary NPs is ...
5
votes
0answers
67 views

the accident happened a mile west of Bowes (Is 'west' an adeverb?)

The Lexico Oxford Dictionary defines a use of 'west' as an adverb: To or towards the west. he faced west and watched the sunset the accident happened a mile west of Bowes I can easily ...
5
votes
1answer
87 views

Term for poetic technique in which the last word of a line is the first word of the next

"Runs in the family" by Amanda Palmer contains the following lyrics: Strips in the city and shares all her best tricks with Me? Well, I'm well The first word of the bridge, "Me?", is ...
5
votes
0answers
300 views

Trump's pronunciation of “origins” as “oringes”

President Trump pronounced the word origins [ˈɔ:rɪʤɪnz] as oringes [ˈɔ:rɪnʤəz] in a meeting with NATO secretary general Stoltenberg at the White House on 3 April 2019. See this clip on Youtube. ...
5
votes
4answers
1k views

If I can say “not that good a review,” does that mean I can say “not that good reviews”?

I'm new to the template, so please forgive my ignorance of this community's parlance, formalities. I'd imagine that many here have seen the construction: "Adjective + Article + Noun," as in "so fine ...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

The use of “keep” to mean “put away” (possibly dialectal or novel usage)

In Welsh, cadw, the verb corresponding to the English verb keep can be used to mean put away or store (something) in its appropriate place. Welsh-speakers will sometimes be teased for transferring ...
4
votes
1answer
92 views

Can a plosive consonant in a word be pronounced as a stop consonant?

ESL teachers always tell people to stop the consonant "p b k g t d" if its at the end of a word and the next word also begins with a consonant. But what about words with double consonant in them? ...
4
votes
3answers
114 views

What is the word to describe an action taken for ones self?

I was wondering what is the best way to describe an action taken for one's self without a negative, or positive connotation behind it? Such as in the action of someone recusing themselves from an ...
4
votes
3answers
107 views

pronoun agreement in neither nor

Which one is correct? Neither my friend nor I feel my best in the morning. Neither my friend nor I feel her best in the morning. Neither my friend nor I feel our best in the morning. I ...
4
votes
1answer
335 views

Are differing pronunciations of “second” a regional difference?

According to Wiktionary the word "second" can be pronounced one of two ways in the US: /ˈsɛk.(ə)nd/ and /ˈsɛk.(ə)nt/ I've googled to try to find anything about the difference between these ...
4
votes
0answers
40 views

Pronunciation of “scald” and “old” (or “ol' ”) in West Ireland

Martin McDonagh's play, The Beauty Queen of Leenane, is obviously set in Leenane/Leenaun, Connemara, County Galway in the west of Ireland. In the script, the two words "scald" and "ol'" (short for "...
4
votes
2answers
799 views

What is it called when someone presents two choices which are the same to emphasize the importance of the option?

I'm very curious to know if there is a name, a word, or a literary scheme/figure of speech/literary device for when in a conversation, you present two choices which are the same, in which the speaker ...
4
votes
1answer
320 views

Origins of the word “understand”?

I'm curious about the word understand and based on brief research its origins seem not very clear, https://www.etymonline.com/word/understand Breaking up the word in two, under-stand, I could make a ...
4
votes
0answers
111 views

Earlier sources or identity of person who coined the term “neutrois”?

A lot of work I've been doing recently has been around the emergence of various gender identities. "Neutrois" recently came to my attention, with more information about it here: https://nonbinary....
4
votes
2answers
90 views

Hypernym for individuals, organizations, possibly other things

I'm building a budgeting database application/program and I'm looking for two words as names of tables or variables in it. This question seeks one of them: It encompasses the following: The table ...
4
votes
1answer
240 views

What rule governs the usage of “by” versus “with”?

There are many instances where by and with mean something completely different, but which is the correct preposition usage in the following sentences? A file by the same name as the original file. A ...
4
votes
0answers
350 views

How did the meaning of “eventually” diverge from the French/German meanings

According to the online etymology sources, the terms "eventual" and "eventually" were in use in the early 1600s and held its current meaning by the mid 1800s. The etymologies point to French éventuel, ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Commas with multiple prepositional (adverbial) phrases at the end of the sentence on the ground of restrictive/non-restrictive modifier

Do we put commas between 2 or more prepositional phrases that immediately follow each other at the end of the main clause if all of them modify/restrict the main predicate differently (e.g. one ...
4
votes
3answers
126 views

Why do people tend to use negation of negative statement

Why do people tend to use negation of negative statement? Let us see an example statement, he is not unhealthy, ... The above statement can have beginning like he is healthy, ... Why exactly ...
4
votes
2answers
203 views

Graded/ungraded adjectives and grading/non-grading adverbs

I saw in the Farlex Grammar Book an explanation of gradable adjectives and graded adverbs. It lists the following words as examples of each category: Gradable adjectives small cold hot difficult sad ...
4
votes
1answer
552 views

What distinguishes a predicative complement from an object?

Asked this on ELL but with no answer: What makes be an intransitive verb? How do we know that the analysis of It is me as transitive by tradtional grammars is incorrect? Take for example: 1. I gave ...
4
votes
2answers
426 views

“Of any mall” vs. “of any malls”

I am an English native speaker working with non-native English teachers. In one of our texts, we came across the following sentence: ABC Mall has the most comprehensive loyalty rewards program of ...
4
votes
4answers
8k views

“Full of spit and vinegar” meaning

I was reading a book and couldn't understand the meaning of this: After all, how many times had her father complained that she was full of more spit and vinegar than most boys? I searched, but I ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

to begin with vs in the first place

I was wondering if it would be grammatically and idiomatically correct to use to begin with in the sense of used at the end of a sentence to talk about why something was done or whether it ...
4
votes
2answers
748 views

Is there a difference between 'on your account' and 'on account of you'?

Consider the following sentences: Get thee hence, lest we too die on your account! Get thee hence, lest we too die on account of you! My intuition is that the two are identical in meaning, ...
4
votes
2answers
178 views

Is there a word for repeating the starting syllables of a word before completing it, in song?

In Coldplay's song Paradise, for example, the chorus goes "Para-para-paradise, para-para-paradise." Is there a term for this?
4
votes
3answers
5k views

“Small question” or “little question”?

There could be a question of which the questioner does not know the answer. But the question may be very easy to the answering person because he is very familiar with the issue or has the information ...
3
votes
0answers
58 views

If an independent clause stands on its own, is it still considered a clause?

There are several definitions related to clauses in my textbook that am a little confused about, and I would greatly appreciate some clarification. Here are the definitions: Clause. A group of words ...
3
votes
0answers
45 views

Example words with ɛ: + difference between ɛ: and ɛ

I've just started studying phonetics and phonology of English and I'm currently trying to find words with the vowel ɛ: as examples for a homework. Also, is there a difference between ɛ: and ɛ, as in, ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

Where does the outdated “thing-O-thing” come from?

In many an outdated medium one may come across words such as gram-O-phone or shear-O-matic. Where does this 'tradition' of having the O seperated come from? Does this stylistic choice have name? I'...
3
votes
1answer
60 views

What's a term for what a “surrogate” stands in for?

I'm not exactly looking for an antonym, however I am searching for a general term which refers to that which the surrogate stands in for. For clarity, I am using the term surrogate to mean to "put in ...
3
votes
0answers
66 views

Genitives of ancient names

I've read (in the Elements of Style) that, while genitives of names ending in ‘s’ may have an additional ‘s’, as in "Ross’s", this oughtn't to be done with ancient names: Exceptions are the ...
3
votes
0answers
37 views

Why the structure “was born”, and not “is born” like in many other languages?

My question is why English uses the past "was" in "I was born", and many other languages (the majority of the European languages for instance), use the present "is" with this past participle? (Je ...
3
votes
2answers
94 views

Is the verb for this gesture “wave off?”

Here is the definition: to wave off To dismiss or refuse by waving the hand or arm: waved off his invitation to join the group. But can "wave off" also be used for this gesture, ...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

Word for a sentence structured like: 'Something is to something as something is to something'

For example: 'Blue is to colours as five is to numbers' You get these kinds of sentences in aptitude tests where they will typically omit the last word for you to work out. Is there a word for ...
3
votes
0answers
72 views

Is it correct to say “imperturbably take damage”?

I have the next sentence: Stay calm and imperturbably take damage or die if need be. Is it right? Can you give me any suggestions?
3
votes
1answer
52 views

pleasure derived from time in nature

What is a word that means pleasure derived from nature? I'm working on an assignment where I need to identify my personal values. So I started by thinking about the non-material things that mean the ...
3
votes
0answers
31 views

What's the grammatical principle behind the use of 'for' with an adjective?

The following common expressions are in the form of for in conjunction with an adjective: (give/take) for granted (leave) for dead for better/worse for sure/certain There doesn't seem to be anything ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Where no man {has gone/went} before

Is there any difference between these two sentences? And how to sense the difference? Where no man has gone before. Where no man went before. The first sentence is the title of episode three of Star ...
3
votes
4answers
62 views

Word for focusing on what you do not have?

I would say “practicing gratitude” to convey the thought of focusing on what one has in life and ruminating on little things in a positive way, the glass half full. What would be the opposite word or ...
3
votes
0answers
53 views

Around Hiram's barn

For most of my life I have used an expression "go around Hiram's barn" to mean an unnecessarily complicated way to do something or an unnecessarily circuitous route. Recently my daughter informed ...
3
votes
0answers
112 views

What is the difference between “if” and “ȝif”?

What is the difference between Middle English "if" and "ȝif"? Wycliffe Bible Mt.6:23 In accordance with studylight.org: "...bodi shal be liytful; 23 but if thin iye be weiward, al thi bodi shal be ...
3
votes
2answers
65 views

How you you spell non self destructive?

Non self-destructive Non-self destructive Non-self-destructive ????? It has to be these
3
votes
1answer
102 views

Is there a grammatical form that helps you to express that you don't believe the speaker? (reported speech)

Indirect speech: Can you express that you don't believe the original speaker of a sentence (with the help of a tense or a verb form)?

15 30 50 per page