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Astrology says 2024 will be Best for All! [closed]

Is Astrology real ???? It says 2024 will be the Best for every person....! I really don't understand how can we predict the future of each and every person on the basis of sun sign or moon sign or ...
Top 10's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

Connotation of "for" / "for the"

I asked this question on ELL and got a satisfactory answer about whether "A new material for manufacture of bricks" is a correct title for a scientific article. However, it seems that ELL is ...
Sardine's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Can "Nothing" be used as answer to the question that starts with the word "How?" [closed]

I want to write a conversation where two characters talk. The other character asks "What do you feel now?" and the other character answers by saying "Nothing". But I have feeling ...
Ketju's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Which preposition is correct to use?

Is it at/on/in with the following phrase: to conjugate .... 3rd Person Singular So far I consistently use "at". Am I right?
YerOrda's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

An unusual subsense of the word 'rider'

I came across a usage of the common word rider on a TV cookery show that I'd never met before. On checking, I found just two online dictionaries with the very specific definition rider [noun] [UK ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Alternative to "would you/can you [please] .."

I am a native English speaker but have never found a comfortable approach to requesting help. Would you please is more commanding/ authoritative in tone than I am looking for typically. Can you [...
WestCoastProjects's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
19 views

Which statement is more correct?

The parameters is getting updated when you change the project rate. The parameters is being updated when you change the project rate. Is there a difference between these two statements? Which ...
Marta's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Is this grammar correct? "New rules are adhere to" [migrated]

Today I learned several vocabs including "adhere to". Also the teacher said that "New rules are adhere to" is also grammatically correct and used normally. However, I think that it ...
Notice's user avatar
  • 99
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

What does “turn down an empty plate” mean?

I was reading Raymond Chandler’s The Lady in the Lake (1943) and came across this quote that puzzled me: Tell Webber I was asking for him. Next time he buys a hamburger, tell him to turn down an ...
Frank Conry's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

Is it true that "all the" means "all of the" and "some" can mean "some of the"? If so, why are they omitted in different ways?

As far as I know, "all the" is actually an informal version of "all of the", see, e.g., all + noun, all + the noun, all of the + noun, all of + noun, which one is right?. Also, in ...
Vezen BU's user avatar
  • 209
-1 votes
1 answer
24 views

What is the meaning of "partial cloaks"

What is the meaning of ""partial cloaks" in this sentence? Partial cloaks that work like sophisticated camouflage -rather like the alien in the 1987 movie Predator — might be ...
Afaq Nafar's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
30 views

What's the word for when two worlds coexist in the same space simultaneously but one is hidden or veiled from the other?

Consider how the wizarding world is hidden from the muggle world in the Harry Potter/ Wizarding World universe. Or in Hell Boy II. The troll market is hidden under a bridge. Red can see it but it's ...
JayeVal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

What's the rule for singular vs plural in "A number of parameters is/are"? [duplicate]

I read this sentence earlier, and it struck me as incorrect: A number of parameters is associated with an open connection. My first thought was the is should be an are, but talked myself out of that ...
Seamus's user avatar
  • 195
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Is “actual” both a false friend and a cognate from Spanish to English?

English definition of “actual”: existing in fact; typically as contrasted with what was intended, expected, or believed. Spanish definition of “actual”: current, present, contemporary These are ...
Felix's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
66 views

Is this a poorly constructed sentence? [closed]

"George Santos became the sixth member of Congress to be expelled from the House of Representatives on Friday." Time.com DECEMBER 1, 2023 The way that sentence reads does it suggest that on ...
Bob516's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
17 views

Can I put down "I'm wondering about whether....." [migrated]

I'm learning about indirect questions, but I'm confused with the use of "wondering about". I was wondering about one thing. Can Lisa fly a helicopter?(combine the sentences) The answer is &...
Wendy's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
46 views

Pronunciation difference b/w Python and Pyramid

Why is "Python" pronounced differently than "Pyramid"? Is there a logic behind why the "PY" is pronounced differently in both?
user492591's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
23 views

What's the word for when someone points something out then your view starts warping to fit what they said even if it isn't actually there [closed]

For example, someone spoils a show or says something is poorly written. Originally you may not have thought or noticed that but suddenly your view starts changing to become similar or the same as ...
crossiant's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Not so good and Bangla [closed]

You must not have any question about the existence of GOD. Is this sentence is correct?
Trina's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
111 views

"That clause" with "subject + verb" replaced by an infinitive

I have 2 questions about the 3 sentences below. Sentence 1: Source: Novel "Holes" by Louis Sachar (1998) - Page79- Line 8 (You can find this sentence on Google Books.) Tell Becca that when ...
L-traveler's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
62 views

Can any member in this group kindly explain to me the meaning of 'Storying' in the context of narrative qualitative ethnographic research? [closed]

I keep coming across the term storying in articles on narrative research. The authors however do not explain how the term storying is different in meaning and connotation from the term storytelling or ...
Sangeeta Roy's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
19 views

"That's all right" vs "Never mind" [closed]

I think both C and D could be the correct answer. What do you think?
Renee Cheung's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Conjugation of epitome and -ous? [closed]

What is the conjugation of the word epitome, with the suffix -ous? Over the years I've searched a few times and could never find it, even back before there was rampant censorship. I don't know why ...
YetAnotherRandomUser's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
71 views

What grammar construction is preventing the highlighted section from committing a "run on sentence" error?

His mother died during his sophomore year, his father when he was a senior. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/01/29/the-lost-giant-of-american-literature
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
72 views

When and where did 'hospice' in the sense of 'palliative care facility or program for the terminally ill' originate in English?

Merriam-Webster's Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, first edition (1898) has this entry for hospice: Hospice, n. {F., fr. L. hospitium hospitality, place where strangers are entertained, fr. hospes ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
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-1 votes
0 answers
27 views

What is the word describing a good Googler? [duplicate]

We read a recent article that had the new word describing someone who can Google and get good results versus others who can never find the answer by Google searching. Do you know the word? We can’t ...
Heather's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
13 views

“the room whose door is broken” vs “the room which door is broken”? [migrated]

Which exactly is the difference in meaning and usage between choosing whose versus choosing which in this first sentence? He chose to live in the room [ which / whose ] door was broken. How do these ...
Didyougo's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
33 views

Meaning of a complex word [closed]

What do you understand when you see a board "Intelligentsia Confluence" in front of a hall in an educational institution?
JEWAD A's user avatar
-3 votes
0 answers
34 views

Why did Jimmy ask, 'Do you think people are more offended by swearing in the States?'? [closed]

— Have you really shagged Jack Nicholson? — Yes. — Well done. — What was he like? — The Joker was wild. — Nice. — The Joker was what? She's even got a line on it! ...Do you think people are more ...
Didyougo's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Synonym for free or costless where non-monetised exchange is involved

I'm looking for a word similar to "free" or "without cost", but that makes it explicit only that no money is exchanged, while still allowing (or implying, or explicitly specifying) ...
phhu's user avatar
  • 523
3 votes
4 answers
299 views

Is "There danced a man in the hall" a grammatical alternative to "A man danced in the hall"? What verbs are possible here? [duplicate]

Does the following sentence sound grammatical to you? There danced a man in the hall With the meaning: A man danced in the hall. And compare it with There died a man in the hall Which one sounds ...
Koray Nedim Özdemir's user avatar
2 votes
4 answers
142 views

Is the term "Hot dog" a misnomer? If not, then what makes a term a misnomer?

I recently engaged in a lively debate with a friend about whether the term "hot dog" qualifies as a misnomer. My argument stemmed from the fact that a hot dog doesn't actually contain dog ...
Steven Grullon's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
37 views

What will be the reduced adjective clause for future indefinite passive voice sentence?

What will be the reduced adjective clause for future indefinite passive voice sentence: “You can’t heal a heart that will be broken multiple times”? I found this interpretation somewhere: “You can’t ...
raj rajput's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Conditional structure – “hadn't have gone”? “hadn't have met”? [duplicate]

Recently I saw two interviews, one with Victoria Beckham, the other one with Elton John. They were talking about their past experiences and that's the phrasing they used: But it wouldn't have ...
Dorota's user avatar
  • 9
0 votes
4 answers
116 views

Is there a word for something that was formerly a social norm but is no longer acceptable?

I've been reading a lot of various classic literature, and at times there is the sort of casual misogyny or racism that was commonplace and (within certain cultures) the social norm at that time. Such ...
oliverseal's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
31 views

Words that you cannot use intensifiers with

My question is what is the name for words that intensifiers cannot be used with. Words like unique or impossible. Something cannot be more unique or more impossible than another thing. I forgot the ...
Iris W's user avatar
  • 11
-1 votes
1 answer
35 views

Is there a commonly used root for "Inclusion" and "Exclusion", or some way to specify the status of being "Included" or "Excluded"? [duplicate]

"Inclusion" means for something to be part of a group "Exclusion" means for something to not be part of a group Whether something is in the group or out of the group is obviously ...
Sidney's user avatar
  • 1,467
4 votes
1 answer
71 views

Origin of the idiom "a few trombones short of a marching band"

I've heard the following idiom being used a few times recently but am unsure where it's come from: He's a few trombones short of a marching band. I don't know exactly what it means and I can't find ...
user1598's user avatar
  • 141
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

How would you use commas to separate adjectives of equal rights? [duplicate]

I am very confused about these separate adjectives of equal rights. The example I got was The Colt's strong, swift defense enabled them to win.
Livizsmart4ELA's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
58 views

What's meant by ". . . he went the pace extraordinary"? (go the pace ?) [migrated]

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XX, published 1892) Passage 319 But before he was out of long clothes, the cloven foot began to show; he proved to be no ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 219
0 votes
0 answers
46 views

why is it a noun phrase and not an adjective phrase? [closed]

In the sentence "The boy is ten years old". Why is 'ten years old' a noun phrase and not an adjective phrase. Doesn't "ten years old" give me more information about the boy. How do ...
Nikhilonly's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

Continuous form of verb or Present participle?

Expanded version: Nobody likes to talk with the man who is sitting on the rock alone. Reduced version: Nobody likes to talk with the man sitting on the rock alone. How is it possible that in the ...
raj rajput's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
12 views

Is the phrase "Those are all cars make Chevrolet." in the English language? [migrated]

How about these? Those are all make Chevrolet cars. and Those are all Chevrolet make cars. Are any of these syntactically correct English phrases?
cherry-noize's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Trying to understand how to connect phrases/clauses with commas

Take this fragment for example: The snow had come from the north, in the mist, driven by the night wind, smelling of the sea. It is from John Le Carré's The Looking Glass War. I've seen writers do ...
Evangelos Aktoudianakis's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
47 views

What do you call the person or character being spoken to in a poem or song?

This question asks what to call the person who is speaking in a lyric poem. The terms "narrator", "speaker", "persona", etc. may be used to refer to the "I" in &...
mriklojn's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

meaning of " I once had it all...My palate was sated…Nostrils stimulated…standing venerated " [closed]

Hello English is not my first language . I came across this sentence that i don't understand : I once had it all...My palate was sated…Nostrils stimulated…standing venerated
Its me's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

Meaning of "these thin boards divided the secret" [closed]

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XX, published 1892) Passage 318 I had escaped the grounds and the cattle; I could not escape the house. A lady with silver hair,...
philphil's user avatar
  • 219
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Is 'where' accurate here, or is 'with' accurate? [closed]

I wrote in my manuscript: 'Let f be a k-face of D where $k \ge 4$.' However, I feel that replacing 'where' with 'with' might be more appropriate. I'm a bit uncertain, so I'm posing this question. Can ...
licheng's user avatar
  • 311
1 vote
2 answers
79 views

Is "all showing that the weapons were being used by the Free Syrian Army" an absolute?

At the same time, dozens of videos of the weapons were being uploaded from Daraya, all showing that the weapons were being used by the Free Syrian Army **Source-New Yorker magazine https://www....
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
97 views

Is the noun modifier "among them a portable anti-tank rocket and a wheel-mounted recoilless rifle" an appositive or absolute phrase?

Higgins was looking at videos coming out of the Daraya region when he noticed several weapons that he had not yet documented in Syria, among them a portable anti-tank rocket and a wheel-mounted ...
rahul sehrawat's user avatar

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