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I've planned my visit for years vs I've been planning my visit for years

Look at these two sentences: I've planned my visit to Japan for years. I've been planning my visit to Japan for years. To me, both are acceptable and interchangeable. Would I be incorrect? Both of ...
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  • 569
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0 answers
14 views

Is "competition" singular or plural in this sentence: [migrated]

In the sentence below, the word "competition" refers to art student peers in other art schools. "Competition" feels like a singular group of people, which means I'd use the verb &...
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26 views

Palatisation in “liked your”

We can palatise don't you or what ya (as in What ya doing?), but it doesn't apply to liked your. I was thinking that palatisation occurs in the first two since there's a voiced sound before the t ...
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  • 447
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0 answers
10 views

Can you "propose an opinion"? [migrated]

I've been trying to rack my brain around a simple sentence that I feel was misconstrued in a discussion I was having. I wanted for a certain discussion topic to "propose an opinion" that ...
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0 answers
13 views

Is there a rule for what kind of sentences can follow "that" [closed]

I'm working on a machine learning approach to language parsing, and I'm trying to generate some synthetic data, basically, stitching together sentences to form new sentences. I'm stuck on "that&...
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  • 101
0 votes
3 answers
38 views

On sabbatical vs on hiatus

Given that sabbatical and hiatus may refer to a period of time taken from one’s main activity, if I say that my professor is “on sabbatical” is it the same as if say that my professor is “on hiatus”? ...
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  • 1,519
0 votes
1 answer
9 views

In the following lines, is the comma before "which" used appropriately? [closed]

For example, the line drawn between the Cambrian and Precambrian periods is a reference, which provides a way for scientists to navigate the nebulous waves of deep time crashing together and hinting ...
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-1 votes
2 answers
26 views

Use of "for" or "in" [closed]

What is the correct form: "... [something] was observed for all cases." "... [something] was observed in all cases." I would bet it's the 2nd form, but I'm not sure. Thanks.
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4 views

Word order and focus ("this finding needs to be cautiously interpreted") [migrated]

Although this finding needs to be cautiously interpreted, /.../ How does this sound to a native speaker? Would it make any difference if we change it to: Although this finding needs to be ...
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  • 111
0 votes
2 answers
27 views

"After looking after myself and my" or "After looking after me and my"?

"After looking after me and my pet, I..." or "After looking after myself and my pet, I..." Does the pronoun "I" not need to be placed at the beginning of a sentence in ...
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  • 37
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0 answers
9 views

Using "the" and "a" in title, figure titles, and headings in an academic paper [migrated]

Is it acceptable to drop "a" and "and" words in the title, figure titles, and headings in an academic paper or on a NEWS website? For example: Instead of writing: "The ...
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0 answers
15 views

Should you include an article when using "idealized" with a unique thing? [closed]

Should you include an article when using "idealized" with a unique thing? Examples: Paris is an idealized London. Python is idealized Ruby. Saturn is idealized Mars. Game of Thrones is an ...
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  • 250
-1 votes
1 answer
23 views

Grammar Check: which is better [closed]

Capricorn "is my birth star" or Capricorn "is my Zodiac sign". Which sentence is more appropriate?
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-1 votes
0 answers
17 views

What are other ways to say "pair of socks"? [migrated]

Can I use the thing that's paired as an adjective to "pair"? If yes, should sock be singular or plural? "sock pair"? or "socks pair"?
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  • 101
2 votes
2 answers
271 views

Why do these quotation marks result in text inconsistencies according to Grammarly? [closed]

I submitted my writing to Grammarly and apparently the quotation marks result in text inconsistencies. Can anyone point out the error with my quotation marks? Apparently all three pairs are ...
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0 answers
13 views

Meaning of "within a period of not more than one month preceding the date of expiry"? [migrated]

I have to renew a license and the rule states that "the application has to be submitted within a period of not more than one month preceding the date of expiry". So the date of expiry is ...
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  • 11
-1 votes
0 answers
14 views

Dashes and commas in the same sentence

If the sentence below is written as such, and I am asked to choose the most appropriate punctuation, which of those choices would work the best? In another the back of the square is pivoted, so that ...
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0 votes
1 answer
25 views

play a role as vs play a role of

I would like to describe someone's role in the company. My editor and I disagree on the use of "as" vs "of" in the sentence X also plays a role as (job-function) vs X also plays ...
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1 vote
1 answer
31 views

It hasn't snowed vs it hasn't been snowing

Ok, to preface this question, I have read extensively on the subject of the present perfect and present perfect continuous. This question isn't about the present perfect for finished actions; rather, ...
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  • 569
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Plural Possessiveness that's so Confusing [duplicate]

Let's say that there are seven people, and each of them has a bar of chocolate. Benny is a thief and like to steal things. Would you say it like this: Benny steal their chocolate bars. or Benny ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
31 views

Is it grammatically correct to omit the linking verb and the relative pronoun in non-restrictive clauses? [duplicate]

I read the below sentence in a book. Most of all, they encountered a populace sick of war, contemptuous of the militarists who had led them to disaster, and all but overwhelmed by the difficulties of ...
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9 votes
3 answers
987 views

Is "create new" not pleonastic?

I wonder why the verb "create" is often followed by the word "new". Does "create" not imply "new"? When I read (in programming languages, for example) "...
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0 votes
2 answers
41 views

'More than I could have hoped for'

Consider the below sentence. Context: The speaker came from a very poor background, and has recently received a promotion to become the CEO of a major company; for that reason the speaker is over the ...
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0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Proper possessive apostrophe usage/pronunciation for singular noun phrase with plural modifiers? [duplicate]

Apologies if the question phrasing is incorrect/not representative of the actual content. Example: The board of trustees's decision vs The board of trustees' decision If we were to drop the ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
31 views

How to determine which year's winter we are in? [duplicate]

If it is February of 2023, can I say it is the winter of 2023? or I should say it is the winter of 2022? I live in the US. Here's what I found online: https://www.calendardate.com/winter_2023.htm --&...
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-1 votes
0 answers
22 views

Is there a verb for the action of an author redefining words incorrectly?

As an author or other communicator, it's often important to define your terms, because words in English (and I assume most other languages) can have multiple meanings. Sometimes authors define words ...
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0 answers
26 views

The whole process takes an hour to complete [closed]

The whole process takes an hour to complete. Could you please tell me whether the subject "whole process" is performing or receiving the act of completion?
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-1 votes
0 answers
19 views

Do I use quotation marks when listing several companies in a sentence? [closed]

One should possess skills such as correctly spelling “Sysco Foods”, “Sysco Software” or “C-Sharp”. Do I use quotation marks when listing several companies in a sentence such as the above?
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-1 votes
1 answer
41 views

Why is the word ‘dictionary’ pronounced differently in British and American English [closed]

Pronunciation of the word 'dictionary' https://dictionary.cambridge.org/pronunciation/english/dictionary from the page agove, in British pronunciation, the /n/ sound is not connected to the schwa ...
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0 votes
2 answers
47 views

The difference in meaning between to infinitive and gerund in these sentences

I saw some examples in a paper on gerund and infinitive as follows. ... deciding whether to use a gerund or an infinitive after a verb can be perplexing among students for whom English is a second ...
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0 votes
0 answers
24 views

Why "respect" is sometimes used with an article in its uncountable meaning? [closed]

In this and other dictionary entries "respect" is said to be uncountable when it means "admiration", yet in many sentences I encounter "respect" used with an article. Why ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
51 views

Is there an archaic abbreviation of "to him"?

I could swear I have heard in some movies the word "to'm", or something similar, as an archaic abbreviation of "to him." Is that correct, or am I mixing it with something else ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
17 views

Is there a word that means "pertaining to a niece", similar to "avuncular"? [duplicate]

Is there a word that means "pertaining to a niece", similar to "avuncular"?
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1 vote
1 answer
43 views

What is a way to say "take pride" without the implication of arrogance?

I want to say "our team takes pride in the quality of our output," but I don't want the audience or my teammates to get the sense that we are arrogant, flawless, or ungracious. How else ...
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  • 111
0 votes
1 answer
28 views

Strict adjective for "in a different country, not your own", for use before a noun (attributive, not predicate), that's not "overseas"?

What would be a usable alternative to overseas, in the very strict sense of "living in a country not your own"? It is strange that the most common attributive adjective for this notion is ...
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0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Why don't we need a comma here? [duplicate]

I'm wondering why a comma is not necessary after the word cheekbones. Is there a rule for this? He didn’t pay much attention to the movie. At least, he had been thinking he didn’t until he felt warm, ...
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  • 329
1 vote
3 answers
82 views

What is it called when the community is too conservative and doesn’t allow out-speaking and free criticism of each other?

This community is so ————— . The members don’t feel comfortable to criticize each other. I am looking for a word or phrase for the blank above. Of course there might be political obstacles against ...
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-2 votes
1 answer
41 views

When is the word "frequent" used and when should it be "frequently"?

We investigated disease activity in female and male patients. Our results suggest that females had higher disease activity than males. So I would like to say that they had less frequent or frequently ...
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1 vote
1 answer
25 views

Can I omit the word 'for' in a parallel structure?

For example in this sentence: Studies have shown that the benefits of environmental initiatives were actually higher for small companies than for big companies. Is omitting the "for" in ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
29 views

Etymology of "attendance" [closed]

I was writing a meeting confirmation email and thought I would write something of the sort: please, confirm your attendance at the meeting by... However, I found on the internet that some people ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
19 views

Is quantitiful a word? [closed]

Some example of words we convert the y into iful (typically rather than changing to yful), common mistake in converting a noun into an adjective. Duty becomes dutiful. Plenty becomes plentiful. But I ...
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0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Why does "out-and-out" mean "thoroughly"? [closed]

I have difficulty learning the phrase "out-and-out" because I have no idea why it means "completely" or "thoroughly". I'm curious about the origin of the usage if it ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
21 views

"I cannot get around to drawing as much as I want" or "I cannot get around to drawing as much as I want to", which one is correct? [closed]

Both sound fine to me. But I am not sure. Is the second better? Thank you for the help.
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-3 votes
0 answers
28 views

The meaning of ‘Pony boy’ in the context of Disney film ‘Finding Nemo’ [closed]

Could anyone please explain to me what does ‘Pony boy’ when used by Marlin to Martin in Disney film Finding Nemo
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0 votes
0 answers
46 views

How did the unusual German-influenced words "spruik" and "spruiker" end up in Aussie and New Zealand slang?

I've recently come across the words spruik and spruiker that are used in Australian and New Zealand slang. Spruik has a quite unusual formation as it is extremely rare in English that a word ends with ...
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3 votes
2 answers
283 views

What is a word for someone who sees themself as ‘unlovable’?

I’m doing some character work and I was wondering if anyone could find a word that means ‘someone who feels unlovable’ or ‘believes themself unworthy of having their love returned’. I'm looking for ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
11 views

Correct wording in the sentence with the present perfect tense [migrated]

I'm having a discussion with my partner about the use of correct wording in the sentence. As we are both foreigners and quite stubborn, we can not decide which version is more native and natural. I’...
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-1 votes
1 answer
22 views

Should quotes be used here? [closed]

From the examples listed, you may be thinking two things: “supporting local soccer communities seems like the best way to go,” and “what did they achieve?"
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-1 votes
0 answers
32 views

Pride and Joy's [closed]

I'm having a shirt made with my grandchildren's photo on it. Around the photo will say: Grandpa's Pride and Joy's. Would this grammar be correct?
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1 vote
0 answers
11 views

Is it wrong when people say "from this year" instead of "starting this year"? [closed]

For example, I will work from this year. To me, it sounds a bit incorrect. Maybe it's best to say "from this year on" or "from this year onwards"? Maybe it's just better to say, &...
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