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What does "Orrin B. Evans" refer to in this context?

This is the context I'm talking about: "Alex Korb's The Upward Spiral is a masterful account of the neuroscience behind depression, as well as of concrete steps that will lead to an 'upward ...
Seres's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
14 views

Can I answer this question with just "no"?

No milk in the fridge? No! Is this a common way for native English speakers to answer?
Nik's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
9 views

Seeking clarification or options for Snoutband

I understand Snoutband refers to a person who often interrupts a conversation to correct and/or contradict the speaker. Could it also refer to a person who butts in AND has to out do the person ...
Michael G. O'Connell's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
6 views

Choose the letter of the correct answers [closed]

What will be the result if there is a change in the chemical properties of a substance
XYRA BLESS BETIC's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
14 views

Which answer is the correct one?

No milk in the fridge? No! No milk in the fridge? No there isn't No milk in the fridge? Yes, there's no milk
Nik's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
17 views

Word for the dust carried by wind

Is there a word for the dust that is carried by the wind and gradually accumulates? In US English 'silt' almost fits: earthy matter, fine sand, or the like carried by moving or running water and ...
Peter Bill's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
24 views

Past Perfect or Simple Past When Using Since in Reported Speech?

While reading The Beautiful and Damned, I stumbled upon a passage that caught my attention. It stated, Only with the flow through the transmitter of his own familiar but faintly impersonal tone did ...
JY WS's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
11 views

serviceman / servicewoman / "/" / serviceperson etc (US)

What's the generally accepted way to refer to someone in the US military whose gender is not known (as the precise individual concerned is unknown)? I notice that the USAF uses/used Airman as a rank ...
Dan's user avatar
  • 4,552
-1 votes
0 answers
17 views

Is 'Ears like a Shite Hawk' an expression for someone with good hearing? [closed]

I'm sure someone used to use this expression for someone with good hearing.
Alister Baldwin's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

What does "poorer prospects" mean here?

More evidence that bordom has detrimental effects comes from studies of people who are more or less prone to boredom. It seems those who bore easily face poorer prospects in education, their career ...
AKHERUZZAMAN's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
58 views

The meaning of the word " sutting" [closed]

While watching a British movie about gangs and drugs, l heard one member of a gang saying "give me the sutting". It seems that he was talking about a gun. Immediately, l looked up the word ...
Mo Ali's user avatar
  • 73
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Which is the correct way to answer this?

So there's no eggs in the fridge? No,there isn't So there's no eggs in the fridge? No! So there's no eggs in the fridge? Yes, there isn't
Nik's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
41 views

How are called the fouls made with the sole? Translation of ‘planchazo’

Need help for an English equivalent of this action, I didn't find anything: planchazo (also plancha) Adelantamiento frontal de la suela del pie, que constituye una infracción en varios deportes. ??? ...
tac's user avatar
  • 454
2 votes
0 answers
37 views

Why do Americans not say "and" when saying particular years?

Why do Americans not say "and" when saying particular years? For example, here in the UK, for 2010, we'd say "two thousand and ten", but in the US, they would say "two ...
Ramona Green's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
9 views

Comma at the end of a line on a commemorative plaque

I am ordering a plaque to commemorate the contributions of an individual to an organization. Is it proper to put a comma at the end of the first line (after "Vossen")? If it was all on one ...
OutofMyDepth's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
44 views

Is a statement considered false or nonsense (invalid), if it consists of a verb applied to a false statement? [closed]

Consider the statement: [1] It's funny that Amy is jumping If Amy isn't jumping, is this sentence considered false or nonsense (invalid)? The following statement is clearly nonsense (invalid): [2] ...
Shuzheng's user avatar
  • 139
2 votes
1 answer
49 views

A word or phrase that means "picky about something they can't have"

I'm searching for a word, phrase, or even an idiom to describe someone who is very picky about things out of their reach. For example, they may love Lamborghinis but think Ferraris are too overstyled ...
Forklift's user avatar
  • 173
4 votes
1 answer
617 views

Use of generic "one" without having to revel the gender

I want to say the following: The more one knows about a subject, the more one realizes how little he knows about it. I want to make it formal and general, thus my use of "one" instead of &...
Elerium115's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Welcome as short version of "you are welcome" [migrated]

Is it possible to say welcome instead of you are welcome? What would be the short response to a thank you, especially in written communication?
Saim Doruklu's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
86 views

Etymology of "banged-up" = "imprisoned"?

1. What is the etymology of banged-up = "imprisoned"? Briefly googling, I couldn't find any etymology. (I'm guessing it came from the banging sound of the gate/door as one is locked up?) ...
user182601's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
34 views

"I give Salle a pocket watch" or "I gave Salle a pocket watch" [closed]

I want to express the sentence in the present simple form, but there's a mistake in "I give..." and "I gave..." I know that the action describes the situation in the past but I ...
Imufet's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
8 views

Prepositional phrases in the end of sentences made A LOT OF ambiguity, But FEW people on web don't raise the questions? [migrated]

PPs are making a lot of ambiguity in sentences especially in the end of sentences. In the structures like VERB+NOUN+PPs. There are two interpretations. One is that PPs is adverbial modifying the VERB, ...
杨啸天's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
18 views

The presence of "the" in the sentence of "Find all (the) indices of the ' ' character in a string" [duplicate]

Find all the indices of the ' ' characters in a string. Find all indices of the ' ' characters in a string. Do these two sentences have any difference? Which one is it if one is more natural than the ...
MJK's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

The usage of the idiom "The road to hell is paved with good intentions."

The idiom "the road to hell is paved with good intentions" conveys the idea that merely having good intentions is insufficient; one must also take action to realize those intentions. As ...
hh_sonja's user avatar
  • 343
3 votes
1 answer
557 views

Olympic basketball terms: what does “gutted on the glass and in the paint” mean?

The U.S. men’s basketball team has been “bullied” in the past because of the size of the players. Generally speaking, Coach Kerr played smaller lineups, and in losing three of their final four games ...
Xanne's user avatar
  • 15.5k
0 votes
2 answers
50 views

How to parse and punctuate the saying: "United we stand, divided we fall."

Personally, I think the phrase should be punctuated like this: "United, we stand; divided, we fall." The thing is, I could envision "United we stand" without a comma perhaps ...
Ben Mo Juan's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Multiple tasks done in one location [closed]

I am looking for a word to describe a location at which you can complete multiple tasks. This is not to be confused with a word to describe a location of multiple items
Chelsey's user avatar
-3 votes
0 answers
45 views

If returned is not a word, how would one note a returning which occured in the past? [closed]

Journalists and other speakers use the construction "He, She, They returned back." This seems redundant to me.
Robert C. Kinnear's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
27 views

The language that describes a grammatical or syntactical error [closed]

'They have advised us that their findings are inconclusive and are unable to disassociate you from the record.' The sentence appears to mix past and future tenses. Perhaps there is a missing ...
user520078's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
1k views

Confusion regarding "since" vs "for" [migrated]

I know that we use "since" when we refer to some specific event that started at some point in the past and is still continuing and "for" when we talk about the duration of the ...
Virender Bhardwaj's user avatar
-3 votes
0 answers
48 views

True antonym of spicy or hot (food) [duplicate]

So far in searching for an antonym for spicy or hot in the context of food I have found words implying a lack (or near lack) of spice, such as mild or unspicy. This contrasts other food descriptors ...
Anastasia Sokol's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
21 views

Nominal sentences for present perfect continuous tense [closed]

Can I say "He have been being annoying for 2 hours"? Are there any formula for nominal sentences of present perfect continuous tense? Pls help me :(
Khenzo Belajar's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

What is it called when someone exaggerates pronunciation of word for emphasis? [duplicate]

I can think of two examples that I have heard many times… Drawing out or almost stuttering parts of a word as in saying “wh-h-h-at?” to express extreme disbelief. The goal seems to be to add imaginary ...
Bill H.'s user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
19 views

Should I use a or the? [closed]

When I’m talking about an object/place/etc that I’m familiar with, but my listener is not/they weren’t there when it happened, should I use a or the? E.x. “I was kicked out of the store” vs “I was ...
Lovisa's user avatar
  • 19
-4 votes
2 answers
50 views

This is relating to a number of posts from a few years ago that I have just stumbled upon [closed]

There seems to be some confusion around the word 'food' and its plural form. The word 'food' is one of those nouns that is singular as well as plural, so you don't put an s on the end to make it ...
user519715's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

Subject-verb agreement for "Most X and Y" subject

Would "is" or "are" be more correct in this sentence? Most acute pharyngitis and laryngitis is/are caused by viral or, more rarely, bacterial infection. I'm not sure if the verb ...
Scott's user avatar
  • 9
-2 votes
2 answers
110 views

Is there a name for someone who always talks about their bodily functions?

I know someone who is always talking about when they poop. They have no problems talking about when they have diarrhea, when they have accidents, or when they soil their underwear. And it almost seems ...
Lou's user avatar
  • 17
9 votes
8 answers
3k views

An adjective for something peaceful but sad?

I need an adjective for that please, is about the energy of the room feeling both sad but quiet and peaceful. There was a ____ atmosphere in the room.
Lara A.L. Martins's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
41 views

What is the function of this phrase? Grammar [closed]

Is the phrase, "When I ride my bike with my friends" functioning as an adverb or a preposition?
Lori Haverstock's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
92 views

Why does Huddleston and Pullum's definition of catenatives exclude objects (and predicative complements)?

A "catenative" complement, according to Huddleston and Pullum, is a non-finite clausal complement (e.g. "He stopped [doing it].") They use the term to refer to the verb, ...
ishtar's user avatar
  • 363
-1 votes
0 answers
25 views

Choice of temporal preposition ('until' or 'at') [closed]

He did not arrive ______ 15:12 we decided to conclude the discussion. Is the answer until or at?
Ibrahim's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
89 views

Is the sentence "We either learn a lesson, or we reach the point." grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the sentence We either learn a lesson, or we reach the point. grammatically correct? I ran a few grammar checking sites and it all came out clear but because of parallelism shouldn't the sentence ...
0825 ATC's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

Please answer me… ‘The only thing which…’ Is it impossible? [duplicate]

The movements themselves are not the only thing which can vary across cultures. Can't 'which' be used in this sentence?
user519418's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
42 views

Commented book, annotated book, a book with marginalia [closed]

Is it correct and idiomatic in English to call a book with marginalia a commented book? Or is it better to call it an annotated book? Or maybe both versions sound really odd and it is better to refer ...
jsx97's user avatar
  • 301
1 vote
1 answer
88 views

Idiom for "different people know different things"

There is the common saying that “one man’s trash is another man’s treasure” to show that different things may have different value to different people. However, I teach a class of students and often ...
wjmccann's user avatar
  • 171
1 vote
1 answer
79 views

Is Swirling a noun?

I have got a title composition from AI "Swirlings of simple Things". Also in the Leo online dictionary is Swirling listed as a noun (https://dict.leo.org/englisch-deutsch/swirling). But I ...
amte's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
17 views

Word 'between' for things like values in range - exclusive/inclusive [duplicate]

Is there any single word that could be used in pair with the word 'between' where the other word is either exclusive or inclusive? Exclusivity is generally dependent on context, with inclusive being ...
Jarek's user avatar
  • 101
11 votes
3 answers
2k views

Are there other proposed translations of "aelfheres" in Beowulf than a name?

Am looking at the online Beowulf site, and wonder about "aelfheres" that is translated as a name. XXXVI WIGlaf wæs haten, Weoxstanes sunu, leoflic lindwiga, leod Scylfinga, mæg ...
Tomas By's user avatar
  • 327
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Is aux inversion okay in this sentence? [duplicate]

My original sentence is It is rare insofar as outcomes can be assessed and methods adapted. If I want to make ‘can’ modify both assess and accept, is it okay to invert ‘can’ like this? It is rare ...
user518899's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Is the following sentence ungrammatical? why? [closed]

We found the woman and her car which had fallen into the river. Why is the above sentence ungrammatical?
user518870's user avatar

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