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Plural or singular? There is or there are? [duplicate]

In some book I have encountered the following phrase: There are a number of text conventions used throughout this book. and a question has arised: whether there should be used the verb is or the ...
Vlad from Moscow's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
217 views

Is it proper to capitalize the scientific method?

I am in the process of writing a book and I am making a lot of references to the scientific method. Is it appropriate (necessary) to capitalize references to the scientific method? As funny as that ...
Unknown Coder's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
47 views

What is a word to describe someone that always questions if something is real. Like a moment captured saying it's photoshopped [duplicate]

Is there a word for someone that is constantly trying to make it irrelevant, or to down a person's photographs, saying they aren't real or they are photoshopped? You know how they do on social media. ...
Jessica Casas's user avatar
20 votes
4 answers
6k views

Where did the pronunciation of the word "kilometer/kilometre" as "kl OM iter" rather than "KILL o meeter" originate?

When saying the word for the SI/metric unit of long distances, the majority of the population pronounce "kilometre/kilometer" as "klomitr", akin to how words like " barometer &...
Aristocratic Jack's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
635 views

How do you pronounce Greenough?

A fairly popular resource over on Latin SE is Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar. Now, "Allen" is fairly straightforward, but how the [redacted] do you pronounce Greenough? Was he a ...
No Name's user avatar
  • 1,344
1 vote
1 answer
75 views

Does double negation make sentences ambiguous? [closed]

I'm having a discussion about if this sentence is logically right or wrong or ambiguous. What do you think? If you do not at least have one or two beliefs that your culture would not retaliate ...
Fee's user avatar
  • 121
11 votes
4 answers
2k views

Sink vs Basin distinction

In australian-english, a sink is a fixture for washing dishes (kitchen sink), clothes (laundry sink, or for big ones, laundry tub), or buckets (cleaner's sink) while a basin is for washing hands (hand ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 1,754
-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

why is there sometimes "a particular" and then a person's name? [migrated]

for example, "I am writing this letter to a particular Mrs. Smith" or "I believe a particular Jane Doe is looking for you, sir!" Why is the phrase "a particular" there ...
alistato's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

Was the phrase "white Christmas" indeed coined in the song?

It's well-known that the song White Christmas - Irving Berlin, 1942 - is one of the world's most popular songs by any of many measures (only McCartney's Yesterday wins in some measures). Apart from ...
Fattie's user avatar
  • 10.7k
0 votes
0 answers
6 views

When can we omit the article in front of a countable word in singular? [migrated]

In the sentence below, there is no "the" in front of former President. I am wondering what is the grammar rule for that? Under Smith and his successor, Douglas, Canada sought closer trade ...
Julia's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

Word for the act of liking something due to its familiarity

I was drafting an essay and going down the rabbit hole of pressing words on thesaurus.com until the right word I was looking for came up, and I came across this word and used it. Then, my computer ...
Katy's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
3 answers
142 views

Won Fin Anymore? (Won't Fit Anymore?)

Why does she says it like "Won Fin Anymore?" in the below movie ? It's impossible to understand it without subtitles. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdQShdZaih8&t=247s I have never ...
HOY's user avatar
  • 133
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

A term for a person who sees a message then reply for some other matter instead of addressing what was needed to be addressed? [duplicate]

For a video I sent to a group. My sister replied by tagging the video and said something about my profile picture which I found rude instead of addressing the video and saying something genuine about ...
Rajnish's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

Correct term for the question as many possible answers

I'm trying to think of a word. So my brother does things without thinking and I try to think of everything that could happen as a result of that decision. Almost a chain effect result. But I can't ...
Zach's user avatar
  • 9
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

what does a prepositional phrase that follows a that clause modify? [migrated]

Consider the following sentence: As secretary, you are to set a meeting agenda that includes discussions in concert with the boss. What word does the prepositional phrase "in concert with the ...
carolyn's user avatar
  • 19
1 vote
0 answers
48 views

Is "Couldn't be able to" incorrect english [closed]

I think it is incorrect but dont have enough knowledge of grammar and definitions to explain why to a friend.
nathan g's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
81 views

Stop blowing your load in the Golden Arches

While doing some research I came across the following phrase: “Young men do not need to proactively freeze their sperm,” says David Ryley, a reproductive endocrinologist at Boston IVF. “If men want ...
Prometheus's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
1k views

"Stop __________ and hurry up!" [migrated]

I'm looking for a verb or phrasal verb to fill in the blank in the situation below: So me and my friend have planned a trip this Saturday and we agreed I would come pick her up at 8 a.m. Saturday ...
Huỳnh Trọng Nhân's user avatar
-2 votes
0 answers
39 views

Should I use who or whom in this blank? [duplicate]

"I don't know _____ gave me this letter." The word in the blank is acting as both the object of "know" and the subject of "gave," is it not? I don't know which pronoun to ...
Corey's user avatar
  • 117
1 vote
1 answer
101 views

watering for a snatch - what does it mean?

Emily Brontë in Wuthering Heights writes: I took a seat at the end of the hearthstone opposite that towards which my landlord advanced, and filled up an interval of silence by attempting to caress ...
Bonnie Parker's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
18 views

I am confused about the second “to” in the sentence? [migrated]

I am confused about the second “to” used in the below sentence. Is it for “ways ‘to’ a smaller budget” but there is no verb in this clause? Is it for “respecting ‘to’ a smaller budget” but it seems to ...
user510487's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
122 views

Is it acceptable to consider the use of the progressive form in R-usage as one of the polite expressions?

I have a question about the progressive form in modal and periphrastic modal verbs. Modal verbs: can (could), may (might), must, should Periphrastic modal verbs: have to, ought to Regarding the ...
M 225's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
1 answer
137 views

Probable language misuse and antonyms?

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but I started to feel like the language (or languages in general) are being misused. We usually say something like: "not good", "not tall", "...
Vaska el gato's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
122 views

Tense that would include past, present and the future?

If I say "I was athletic", It means it was in the past. If I say "I have been athletic", it means I was in the past and I remain athletic today. Is there any way to say "I was,...
Vaska el gato's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
41 views

Can I use a colon to introduce direct speech, if I continue the sentence after the quote? [duplicate]

Can I use a colon to introduce direct speech, if I continue the sentence after the quote? There are a lot of examples on the Internet where a quote stands between an introductory phrase and a clause ...
Nikita Shchemlev's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Is a possessive apostrophe appropriate in the verb phrase 'to save someone something'? [migrated]

I've drafted the following sentence: There is also a lot of work going into creating useful, effective and ethical AI tools to save teachers time. A grammar checker has recommended a possessive ...
ahjs2931's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
150 views

Is there a correct answer to "How should foreign names be pronounced in English"? [duplicate]

There are some names that are pronounced very differently in English Language media around the world. One famous example is Vincent van Gogh the artist, another that is in a lot of media at the ...
User65535's user avatar
  • 231
-1 votes
0 answers
16 views

Properly indicating number agreement for the word company [duplicate]

Alright, so let's say that I'm selling tickets, I could either sell 1 (singular) ticket or multiple (plural) tickets, and if I wanted to write the number of tickets each person purchased in a uniform ...
Tfinnm's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

How to say this

I received an email from this company, in which they proposed a job to me. I sent them an email saying that I would like to work with them. After 3 months I haven’t yet received any email from them. ...
Sasan's user avatar
  • 3,462
0 votes
2 answers
48 views

Using "content" vs. "contents" when referring to multiple written works

I am aware of the previous discussions on "content" vs. "contents". According to the top answer there, it looks like they can be used interchangeably when referring to a written ...
Superbee's user avatar
  • 103
1 vote
1 answer
44 views

Is there a difference between talk someone around, bring someone around and talk someone into?

I also had a question about the differences between these three phrasal verbs. I understand that "to talk around" and "to bring around" have to do with changing one's mind, but how ...
Alice's user avatar
  • 41
3 votes
1 answer
94 views

What are the differences between to sweet-talk, smooth-talk- butter up, suck up to, cajole, coax, wheedle, inveigle, beguile, and get round someone? [closed]

Are there any differences between the verbs sweet-talk, smooth-talk, butter up, suck up to, cajole, coax, wheedle, inveigle, beguile, and get round someone ? I am aware that this question is very long,...
Alice's user avatar
  • 41
0 votes
2 answers
75 views

"That NP is Ving" as a noun phrase: different degrees of acceptability for different nesting?

I am confused that a use that is seemingly grammatical doesn't sound right. That our cattle are ailing is worrying. I find that our cattle are ailing worrying.* Has anyone said of that our cattle are ...
capyman1701's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
29 views

Is it correct to use a comma before a yes or no at the end of an answer sentence instead of a period? [closed]

When you ask someone Do you like ice cream? They might respond by repeating the question words in their answer, like this: Yes, I do. Often, though, people reverse the order of the above answer, ...
CaptainLost's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
79 views

Idiomatic words for saying ‘yes and no’ at the same time (or best translation for ‘ní’) [duplicate]

Imagine this: You have to answer a yes/no question but it is so complex that you can't even just say ‘yes’ or ‘no’. You do know the answer (or an answer), but you know that the question is open and it'...
tac's user avatar
  • 474
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

In Northern England, what vowel phoneme is used in “can’t”?

Which vowel phoneme, START or TRAP, do people in the North of England usually use in can’t? (Obviously the northern START is pronounced like a longer version of TRAP, which is not the case in the ...
Monkle's user avatar
  • 71
2 votes
1 answer
75 views

Is sentence itself a syntactic function or not?

There are syntactic functions of subordinate clauses. But what about main clauses? For example: Assertive clause: He is a good student. Is its syntactic function sentence itself or something else?
Salim uddin's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
100 views

Why are simple numerical proportions usually expressed in percent?

In English, proportions that add up to ten are almost always expressed as percentages, such as “60-40”. We do this even when we don’t know the proportions to a precision of hundredths, and it would be ...
Paul Richter's user avatar
  • 3,108
1 vote
0 answers
156 views

What is the meaning of "pranging" in this context? Is it US slang?

In the book Palace of Treason by Jason Matthews, I encountered the following sentence, that I summarized to eliminate unnecesary information: She weaved through the crowds of pedestrians in the red ...
Wild Feather's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
84 views

"And " vs "Or" when using respectively

I want to reduce my sentence to a shorter sentence. My actual intention is: In real-type representations, k is 1, in complex-type representations, k is 2, and in quaternion-type representations, k is ...
khashayar's user avatar
  • 129
3 votes
0 answers
85 views

Why is bowl spelled with ⟨ow⟩?

Generally speaking, in cases where an Old English ⟨ā⟩ or ⟨o⟩ becomes /oʊ/ in Modern English, the result may be written with either ⟨oa⟩ or ⟨o…e⟩: rād > road, grānian > groan col > coal, fola ...
Вася Антонов's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
59 views

Was there a single word or simple phrase that had the same meaning as silhouette before it entered the language

The word silhouette has its origins in Étienne de Silhouette's (France's finance minister under Louis XV) hobby of making cut-paper shadow portraits. Merriam-Webster Was there a single word or two-...
Bob516's user avatar
  • 642
-2 votes
1 answer
62 views

Words describe American dream lifestyle [closed]

It’s a two words term: xxxtter-xxtter, used to describe an affluent, perfect American dream type of lifestyle. Context: everyone wants to live a xxxtter-xxxtter life, but it’s not realistic.
Yue Zheng's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
525 views

Can we use 3rd person singular for "Come Find"?

I have the following question which Copilot, Gemini, and ChatGPT couldn't answer properly. I understand that in American English, people drop and in "Come and Find," and say "Come find.&...
mac's user avatar
  • 61
0 votes
4 answers
136 views

Is it "banknote" or "bank note"?

Which form is correct, the one-word "banknote" or the two word "bank note" and why? Does correctness depend on region, such that one form is correct in one country, while the other ...
Jaredo Mills's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

Run or ran correct? [duplicate]

Ewes are pasture ran all year on grass. Or Ewes are pasture run all year on grass. Which is correct American English?
DDH's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
3 answers
134 views

Past participle or adjective?

John is highly educated. John was educated in London. According to traditional grammar, educated is an adjective in the first sentence and a verb in the second sentence (past participle). But ...
Jvlnarasimharao's user avatar
18 votes
3 answers
3k views

Origin of "That tracks" to mean "That makes sense."

For the past few years, I have been hearing people say "that tracks," meaning "that makes sense." My search on Green's Dictionary of Slang yielded nothing with this clear meaning, ...
RaceYouAnytime's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
48 views

What is the word for the sky opposite the sunset? [duplicate]

This question landed me here on this site. I’ve Googled, looked on Reddit, Quora, looked in Websters, Encarta, and asked people I know, but haven’t found any satisfying (to me, anyway) answers. I’ve ...
Firefly's user avatar
  • 29
2 votes
2 answers
143 views

Finding a word for a feeling

I'm trying to find a word for the feeling of holding onto anger or sadness because it seems the proper thing to do. Examples may include having a friend that was wronged, and though your life is good, ...
Rebecca's user avatar
  • 21

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