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0 votes
9 answers
170 views

A word that is NOT provoke, but means to more or less elicit a reaction

So there is a term or phrase I'm looking to use. I need assistance in finding it. The definition I would have in mind, would be: someone who will do, word, or say things, or behave in a certain way to ...
Maddie Kiley's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
84 views

Are cost and cast being regularized?

I watch a fair few videos about video games on youtube, and a while back I started to notice that many people in those videos used "costed" and "casted" for the past tenses of &...
Zersetzor's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
357 views

What is the meaning of '"It's nart'ral" in "Pollyanna" by Eleanor H. Porter?

From a part of "Pollyanna" written by Eleanor H. Porter: Old Tom shook his head. "I know. I've felt it. It's nart'ral – but 'tain't best, child; 'tain't best. Take my word for it, '...
The III World man's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
30 views

What is the difference between verbs "will" and "would"? [migrated]

What is the difference between verbs "will" and "would"? I have two examples below: I am trying to talk to him, but he won't listen. I was trying to talk to him, but he wouldn't ...
Александр Скворцов's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Using "the" before a profession and name

A column heading in a recent New Yorker magazine : "The staff writer Sarah Larson on natural history marvels." Why would "the" be used here? Wouldn't the heading be correct without ...
Jumpringer's user avatar
8 votes
4 answers
2k views

What does ‘a grade-hog’ mean?

I would like to know the meaning of a grade-hog in this New York Times quotation about How We Learn by Benedict Carey: Carey, a New York Times science reporter, begins his book with a confession: He ...
moghadasi mohamadreza's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
12 views

Quotation marks or italics depending on the speaker having said, vs. mouthed, vs imagined, etc [duplicate]

Quotation marks or italics? He said, "I love you." He mouthed, I love you. June asked a similar question back on November 8, but she got no responses. I'm inclined to go with quotation ...
Falls Church's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
269 views

How does one determine if something is "Modern" or not?

I’m wondering if there is a formal way of determining if something is considered ‘Modern’? For example, No one in a modern war has ever ... Modern farming techniques have ... Modern smartphones need ...
Tolure's user avatar
  • 415
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

A question about the sense of verbs [migrated]

Can we say, "He comes/goes" instead of "He comes here/goes there." if the listener knows where that person comes/goes?
Salim uddin's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
72 views

In need of the word or phrase describing studying or educating in a non-formal way or as a hobby

So when I was 14 years old I started an interest in psychology. I've been studying it (legitimate medical research articles, textbooks, clinical guides, etc vs googling) for almost 13 years at this ...
Maddie Kiley's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
58 views

Meaning of joined in marriage [closed]

“I joined in marriage Ben and Nicole”… when the officiant write it in the marriage certificate can it have a double meanings? The first meaning is- I united in marriage Ben and Nicole- meaning I ...
Karen Lisbon's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
70 views

To do what it takes

I am interested in the idiom "do what it takes". Is it necessary for this idiom to include the goal? Can I say just "I will do what it takes.", when the goal is clear from context? ...
David Vonka's user avatar
3 votes
4 answers
159 views

Is a painting "made by" a painter or just "by" a painter?

Unbelievably and infuriatingly, as a result of proofreading my paper, I managed to create and insert a typo while correcting other mistakes. It was actually correct before. The first line is now: Der ...
AdjunctProfessorFalcon's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
40 views

How correct are phrases often used in technical papers like "window size" and "network parameters"? [duplicate]

Often when reading scientific papers, especially ones of the modern technology industry, I stumble upon phrases like: we have tuned the network parameters to [...] the window size was set to be [...] ...
Karol Szustakowski's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
61 views

Is it correct to use "as quickly as he never had....."?

So I was reading something someone had written and I came across: He < does something> as quickly as he never had in < time period> It just seemed a bit odd to me and I didn't encounter ...
Abella's user avatar
  • 13
2 votes
4 answers
111 views

"as tall as the building" or "as high as the building"

"The new building will be as tall as the Empire State Building" and "The new building will be as high as the Empire State Building." Which one is correct?
jo W's user avatar
  • 29
0 votes
1 answer
47 views

Looking for a word/phrase for "fidgety" [closed]

I am looking for a single word or phrase to describe someone who mindlessly fidgets with things constantly.
Dorothy Ivey's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
157 views

Is there a word that means the opposite of 'embarrassing'?

I have scoured every thesaurus I can find but cannot seem to find a (single) word that I can use to replace 'embarrasing' to signify the opposite of embarrassing (as opposed to the lack of ...
sara's user avatar
  • 37
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

"I want someone to do something." — Where are arguments here?

In an ongoing attempt to find the examples where complements and arguments don't coincide with each other, I came across these two answers of the user "BillJ". from BillJ's answer on english....
Loviii's user avatar
  • 742
-1 votes
1 answer
62 views

What do you call the front end of a pioneer’s wagon?

The part where the driver, holding the reins would sit, with another person by his side.
jim metzner's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
22 views

Using the Present Perfect and the Past Simple after the preposition "before" in an adverbial clause [migrated]

KOTB: (Voiceover) Behind the shouting, behind the intense focus on basketball, coach is busy doing for these girls what he's been doing for 26 years. Shaping young lives. His reach extends well beyond ...
MickeyQ's user avatar
  • 29
4 votes
2 answers
785 views

Is "parse out" actually a phrasal verb, and in what context do you use "parse"

I came across this text example about phrasal verbs: There's no better investment than the most comfortable sneakers Maybe your last beloved pair is kinda falling apart and desperately needs to be ...
hh_sonja's user avatar
  • 353
-1 votes
0 answers
24 views

Reasons for doing something and reasons to do something :do that make a difference? [duplicate]

You attended a XXX workshop...Your teacher has asked you to write a review… The content should include: … The reasons for joining it … This is my writing task and I am pretty confused about ...
sativaoryza's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
19 views

which one is correct, "looking forward to hear" OR "looking forward to hearing" [migrated]

From my understanding, 'to' is not followed by 'continuous form'. So the latter version "looking forward to hearing" looks incorrect to me. However, when I type that in gmail, it first auto ...
Ankit's user avatar
  • 315
1 vote
2 answers
69 views

What does "over the grind" means?

I searched on Google and YouTube, but I didn't find any results about "over the grind" at all. And I'm not sure what it means. However, I found "grind (down)" which is perhaps a ...
SHEIK GAMES's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
31 views

What is the correct way to write a plural of several singular numbered items? [duplicate]

Box 1 + Box 2 = "Box Nos. 1 and 2" or "Boxes Nos. 1 and 2"
jane's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
59 views

Is it true that every argument is a complement but not every complement is an argument?

The textbook "The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language", page 226: Argumenthood In the simplest cases the propositional meaning of a clause (ignoring the component contributed by the ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 742
-1 votes
0 answers
39 views

Chasing the clouds away

A number of popular songs from the 1960's and 1970's contain a variant of the phrase "chasing the clouds away": Moody Blues, 1967, Forever Afternoon (Tuesday?): "It doesn't matter to ...
Mark Beadles's user avatar
  • 22.7k
1 vote
0 answers
38 views

say a quarter over

The following excerpt is from Charles Dickens's David Copperfield. In search of the principle on which joints ought to be roasted, to be roasted enough, and not too much, I myself referred to the ...
Trollbjorn's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

What is difference between these two constructions? [duplicate]

Here are two constructions: I suggested that the dish be cooked exactly before the party. I suggested to cook the dish exactly before the party. What is the difference between them? Does the first ...
Александр Скворцов's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
8 views

"Music brings people joy." What is the object? [migrated]

Music brings people joy. In this sentence, what is the object?Is it people or joy?If it's joy, is people the indirect object?
Mu jinxuan's user avatar
12 votes
9 answers
2k views

Idiom for a situation where a problem has two simultaneous but unrelated causes?

A colleague of mine, who is a software engineer, recently mentioned that while debugging problems he often finds that, for any given symptom he is investigating, there turn out to be two simultaneous ...
Carcer's user avatar
  • 221
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

When a word fits the description but someone says it's not that word? [duplicate]

That is to say, if someone were to say "It's not grey, it's dark white." or "It's not racist, it's just a racially specific insult" What term would one use to describe that? I'm ...
Cassie's user avatar
  • 19
0 votes
1 answer
101 views

Types of English where "try [bare infinitive]" is common? (e.g. I'll try work on it) [closed]

I've found myself using try with verbs in their bare infinitive (without 'to'). Are there are dialects/types of English where this syntax is common or standard? Examples I'll try work on it. He said ...
user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is the meaning of "Wa’al"?

What is the meaning of "Wa’al"? Here is a quote from Charles Dickens' A Message from the Sea: “Wa’al, my good sir,” said the captain cordially, “the present question is, and will be long, I ...
POP POP's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes
0 answers
38 views

Plural or singular? There is or there are? [duplicate]

In some book I have encountered the following phrase: There are a number of text conventions used throughout this book. and a question has arised: whether there should be used the verb is or the ...
Vlad from Moscow's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
217 views

Is it proper to capitalize the scientific method?

I am in the process of writing a book and I am making a lot of references to the scientific method. Is it appropriate (necessary) to capitalize references to the scientific method? As funny as that ...
Unknown Coder's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
47 views

What is a word to describe someone that always questions if something is real. Like a moment captured saying it's photoshopped [duplicate]

Is there a word for someone that is constantly trying to make it irrelevant, or to down a person's photographs, saying they aren't real or they are photoshopped? You know how they do on social media. ...
Jessica Casas's user avatar
20 votes
4 answers
6k views

Where did the pronunciation of the word "kilometer/kilometre" as "kl OM iter" rather than "KILL o meeter" originate?

When saying the word for the SI/metric unit of long distances, the majority of the population pronounce "kilometre/kilometer" as "klomitr", akin to how words like " barometer &...
Aristocratic Jack's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
632 views

How do you pronounce Greenough?

A fairly popular resource over on Latin SE is Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar. Now, "Allen" is fairly straightforward, but how the [redacted] do you pronounce Greenough? Was he a ...
No Name's user avatar
  • 1,344
1 vote
1 answer
75 views

Does double negation make sentences ambiguous? [closed]

I'm having a discussion about if this sentence is logically right or wrong or ambiguous. What do you think? If you do not at least have one or two beliefs that your culture would not retaliate ...
Fee's user avatar
  • 121
11 votes
4 answers
2k views

Sink vs Basin distinction

In australian-english, a sink is a fixture for washing dishes (kitchen sink), clothes (laundry sink, or for big ones, laundry tub), or buckets (cleaner's sink) while a basin is for washing hands (hand ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 1,754
-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

why is there sometimes "a particular" and then a person's name? [migrated]

for example, "I am writing this letter to a particular Mrs. Smith" or "I believe a particular Jane Doe is looking for you, sir!" Why is the phrase "a particular" there ...
alistato's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
2k views

Was the phrase "white Christmas" indeed coined in the song?

It's well-known that the song White Christmas - Irving Berlin, 1942 - is one of the world's most popular songs by any of many measures (only McCartney's Yesterday wins in some measures). Apart from ...
Fattie's user avatar
  • 10.7k
0 votes
0 answers
6 views

When can we omit the article in front of a countable word in singular? [migrated]

In the sentence below, there is no "the" in front of former President. I am wondering what is the grammar rule for that? Under Smith and his successor, Douglas, Canada sought closer trade ...
Julia's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
54 views

Word for the act of liking something due to its familiarity

I was drafting an essay and going down the rabbit hole of pressing words on thesaurus.com until the right word I was looking for came up, and I came across this word and used it. Then, my computer ...
Katy's user avatar
  • 11
2 votes
3 answers
142 views

Won Fin Anymore? (Won't Fit Anymore?)

Why does she says it like "Won Fin Anymore?" in the below movie ? It's impossible to understand it without subtitles. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pdQShdZaih8&t=247s I have never ...
HOY's user avatar
  • 133
0 votes
1 answer
41 views

A term for a person who sees a message then reply for some other matter instead of addressing what was needed to be addressed? [duplicate]

For a video I sent to a group. My sister replied by tagging the video and said something about my profile picture which I found rude instead of addressing the video and saying something genuine about ...
Rajnish's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

Correct term for the question as many possible answers

I'm trying to think of a word. So my brother does things without thinking and I try to think of everything that could happen as a result of that decision. Almost a chain effect result. But I can't ...
Zach's user avatar
  • 9
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

what does a prepositional phrase that follows a that clause modify? [migrated]

Consider the following sentence: As secretary, you are to set a meeting agenda that includes discussions in concert with the boss. What word does the prepositional phrase "in concert with the ...
carolyn's user avatar
  • 19

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