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How to respond to "sorry for taking so long"? (After someone finishes a task, not in email) [closed]

After a plumber finished his task, he said to me "sorry for taking so long". I wanted to say that it's not long, and I think he finished everything quickly and I appreciate that. What should ...
Quincy's user avatar
  • 1
-2 votes
1 answer
43 views

Definite article with uncountable nouns [closed]

I can't understand the use of the definite article with the word "hardware". For example, a lecture in my computer science course reads: Software is the general category of code which runs ...
Artem's user avatar
  • 55
0 votes
0 answers
63 views

Repeating a clause in a question [duplicate]

I’m groping for the name of the construction where one directly repeats all or part of a clause in a question as a way of expressing whimsy or making it wistful. Aren’t we all just people, Jim, aren’...
M E's user avatar
  • 3
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

What's the meaning of "burrish"? [closed]

As the title said, I wonder what's the meaning of burrish ?
PurpleMonky's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

What does ´added twist´ mean? [duplicate]

in the sentence : He performed his experiments with patients , this time with an added twist . it differs from ´with a twist´
moghadasi mohamadreza's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
31 views

Best English language classics to use as an example of clear writing [closed]

I would like to suggest a bunch of non native speakers some titles that are in English (not translations, no matter how good), that are good examples of a language that is clear, and simple. I am ...
user522923's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

What is the correct preposition for imagine? [migrated]

I would like to know if the following sentence is correct. It might be different from what you imagine from shaved ice. Context: I work at a restaurant that serves unusual shaved ice and I would like ...
tet's user avatar
  • 101
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Can I use the noun "luge steering" to refer to the act of steering a luge? [migrated]

For a research paper about the luge sport, I initially wrote: "According to our model of luge steering [...]". A colleague remarked that this sounds strange. According to him, nobody would ...
Enuff's user avatar
  • 101
2 votes
6 answers
650 views

I’m looking for a word that describes a decision being imposed on you unwillingly [closed]

A word that implies a decision has been imposed on you against your will and perhaps accepted against your better judgment.
Duncan's user avatar
  • 29
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

What is this conditional? [duplicate]

The next morning Dodo was driving me to Silent Hill, and if I was to run away before it was too late, now was the time. So, why not_ now would be the time_, so it would be second conditional? Or it ...
Askhat's user avatar
  • 1
22 votes
8 answers
6k views

How to pronounce Türkiye in English?

So, for a few years now, the country that was formerly known as Turkey wants the be known as Türkiye. International organisations like the United Nations, the OECD, and the World Bank Group seem to ...
Řídící's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
36 views

Miscellany vs. Miscellanea [closed]

What is the difference between "miscellany" and "miscellanea"? From what I read about, it seems that a book that consists of short stories can be called "miscellany" but ...
jsx97's user avatar
  • 301
2 votes
2 answers
79 views

Use of the word "any" with imperative verbs. Singular or Plural

I have a grammar question that I'm having a hard time finding a good answer to. The word "any" is quite a versatile and ambiguous word that could mean one item, multiple items, all the way ...
user522546's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
74 views

What is a Word for the Repetition of a Theme Song throughout a Show [duplicate]

What is a word to describe the theme song of a show, such as a movie or cartoon, in which it recurs often, but in a toned-down mode such as played softly by a single horn or string instrument. The ...
Ross Bush's user avatar
  • 133
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Is it patronising and infantilising to always include the term "we" when working in hospitality? [duplicate]

I have to say I feel really uncomfortable at the approach of one of the bar staff in a village pub I visit. He will refer to customers, new or regular, male or female as "my love", "...
Trebor's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
146 views

What Is the Function of the Participle Clause in 'Time + -ing'?

[1] My time working in the US was eventful, to say the least.' In Example 1, I have used a participial-gerund clause (or present participle clause, if you prefer) alongside the noun 'time,' and I'm ...
MJ Ada's user avatar
  • 353
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

What does it mean to "drop one's line of sight" [migrated]

In the wake of the Donald Trump assassination attempt several bloggers are referring to this tweet by a former secret service agent. He is explaining why the snipers did not take out the attacker ...
Mads Skjern's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

Phrase “In the highest” [closed]

Beyond the phrase “Hosanna In the Highest” and the song title from Becky Lucas, do you know of other uses of this phrase in everyday or literary English?
Sebastian's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare [migrated]

Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare infinitive (do)? I am an esl Chinese resident. And I read a comment, of which the commentator thinks I am benighted. (But I admit it's ...
fafafafa's user avatar
1 vote
5 answers
105 views

Is there a better word for 'anonymity' here? [closed]

This is the sentence: The Festival was the reason he had chosen this place to enter the country, the safety and 'anonymity' it provided would make his further travels much smoother. Some context: ...
EMS's user avatar
  • 339
23 votes
5 answers
4k views

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t?

I was under the impression that because ‘witch’ ends with a /tʃ/ sound, the ‘t’ is not silent but directly represents an essential element of the pronunciation. However, a word game (the New York ...
76987's user avatar
  • 355
11 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why do we say "commit" a crime?

How did the word "commit" become so associated with performing a criminal act ("he committed a crime", "she committed a robbery" - also generally applies to errors, ...
Rabbi Kaii's user avatar
1 vote
4 answers
111 views

How to quote a word in quotes [duplicate]

I want to quote a scholar's use of the term irrealis flavour. So normally I would just say: XYZ merely says that such constructions have an 'irrealis flavour'. However, the original scholar actually ...
Araucaria - Him's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
77 views

Why are the words "mobile" and "profile" pronounced differently in American English? [closed]

Why is it like that even though both of them end in the same letters?
Niklas's user avatar
  • 67
2 votes
5 answers
415 views

Formal written form for a 2x something? [closed]

In a sentence where I want to say a title or position that has been awarded twice, how do I phrase it? For instance "He was a 2x runner-up for the Champion title", would it be "two time&...
sarahh's user avatar
  • 29
1 vote
1 answer
116 views

Idiomatic expressions for making sarcastic comparisons with other person: translations for ‘otra que’ or ‘ser un poroto’ [closed]

Consider this situation. I'm playing a football game and one of my teammates eludes all the opponents and scores all on his own. If he is a regular player, I would say with irony one of these two ...
tac's user avatar
  • 474
1 vote
1 answer
23 views

"I", "I'd" and "I had" questions [duplicate]

I wanted to know if the sentence "I wish I understood." is correct. I couldn't find any similar uses online, I always find uses with anothers words or "I'd" or "I had" ...
emotion's user avatar
  • 39
5 votes
2 answers
361 views

What's quasi-modal be?

What's quasi-modal be? It is not a traditional grammar term. Google says You are to be good. <=> You must be good. Other than obligation, what modalities can the quasiness refer to? What ...
XCX's user avatar
  • 77
1 vote
2 answers
65 views

Deck as verb and the accompanying preposition

As per Cambridge dictionary and others, the word 'deck' in its verb form means to decorate or add something to something to make an effect: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/deck ...
Ammu's user avatar
  • 133
0 votes
0 answers
6 views

Negative "not" in the clause [migrated]

Is there any difference between clauses below? Wouldn't he help you? Would he not help you? I saw the second clause in the PS1 game "Front mission 3". I sometimes think that games are not ...
Александр Скворцов's user avatar
10 votes
11 answers
2k views

What is a proper word for (almost) identical products?

In my language we say "these products are analogues (of each other)" meaning they are similar to be point of being identical. For example, when procuring equipment, one may argue that we can ...
Mike's user avatar
  • 101
-1 votes
0 answers
37 views

Are "reasons" or "rhymes" pronounced with S or Z? [duplicate]

It seems everyone where I am says reasons is pronounced with an s sound, or rhymes is pronounced with s, when I believe they should be pronounced with z. Is there a general principle I can apply?
Stéphane Villatte's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
67 views

Is "The Shining" a title with a gerund, or a regular -ing noun? [duplicate]

Does using "the" or "a" in front of a gerund alter it somehow? "A painting," for example, is not a gerund, and if a book were titled "The Painting" it would not ...
Sarah's user avatar
  • 11
7 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the meaning of "sutting "?

On Netflix, I came across the word sutting while watching a British series called Supacell. It seems that the actor was talking about a gun. Unfortunately, I haven't found its meaning in any ...
Mo Ali's user avatar
  • 145
-2 votes
1 answer
60 views

Can anyone explain the meaning of "as an old fisherman used to say when I was a boy not so very long ago, ..."

I read a novel, there is one sentence I cannot understand: And he slapped the little bunny's back and gave a hop, skip and jump to one side, and then laughed some more, for he was as happy as a clam ...
Ugly duck's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
50 views

Equation X is given "by" or "as"? [closed]

Which sentence is correct? Equation A is given by x+y=z. Equation A is given as x+y=z.
s28's user avatar
  • 25
0 votes
2 answers
59 views

What does "Orrin B. Evans" refer to in this context?

This is the context I'm talking about: "Alex Korb's The Upward Spiral is a masterful account of the neuroscience behind depression, as well as of concrete steps that will lead to an 'upward ...
Seres's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

Can I answer this question with just "no"? [migrated]

No milk in the fridge? No! Is this a common way for native English speakers to answer?
Nik's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Seeking clarification or options for Snoutband [duplicate]

I understand Snoutband refers to a person who often interrupts a conversation to correct and/or contradict the speaker. Could it also refer to a person who butts in AND has to out do the person ...
Michael G. O'Connell's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

Which answer is the correct one? [duplicate]

No milk in the fridge? No! No milk in the fridge? No there isn't No milk in the fridge? Yes, there's no milk
Nik's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
50 views

Word for the dust carried by wind

Is there a word for the dust that is carried by the wind and gradually accumulates? In US English 'silt' almost fits: earthy matter, fine sand, or the like carried by moving or running water and ...
Peter Bill's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
76 views

Past Perfect or Simple Past When Using Since in Reported Speech? [duplicate]

While reading The Beautiful and Damned, I stumbled upon a passage that caught my attention. It stated, Only with the flow through the transmitter of his own familiar but faintly impersonal tone did ...
JY WS's user avatar
  • 39
1 vote
1 answer
39 views

serviceman / servicewoman / serviceperson etc (US)

What's the generally accepted way to refer to someone in the US military whose gender is not known (as the precise individual concerned is unknown)? I notice that the USAF uses/used Airman as a rank ...
Dan's user avatar
  • 4,562
0 votes
0 answers
39 views

Which is the correct way to answer this? [duplicate]

So there's no eggs in the fridge? No,there isn't So there's no eggs in the fridge? No! So there's no eggs in the fridge? Yes, there isn't
Nik's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
1 answer
60 views

How are called the fouls made with the sole? Translation of ‘planchazo’

Need help for an English equivalent of this action, I didn't find anything: planchazo (also plancha) Adelantamiento frontal de la suela del pie, que constituye una infracción en varios deportes. ??? ...
tac's user avatar
  • 474
2 votes
0 answers
60 views

Why do Americans not say "and" when saying particular years? [closed]

Why do Americans not say "and" when saying particular years? For example, here in the UK, for 2010, we'd say "two thousand and ten", but in the US, they would say "two ...
Ramona Green's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
52 views

Is a statement considered false or nonsense (invalid), if it consists of a verb applied to a false statement? [closed]

Consider the statement: [1] It's funny that Amy is jumping If Amy isn't jumping, is this sentence considered false or nonsense (invalid)? The following statement is clearly nonsense (invalid): [2] ...
Shuzheng's user avatar
  • 141
2 votes
1 answer
76 views

A word or phrase that means "picky about something they can't have"

I'm searching for a word, phrase, or even an idiom to describe someone who is very picky about things out of their reach. For example, they may love Lamborghinis but think Ferraris are too overstyled ...
Forklift's user avatar
  • 173
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

Use of generic "one" without having to revel the gender

I want to say the following: The more one knows about a subject, the more one realizes how little he knows about it. I want to make it formal and general, thus my use of "one" instead of &...
Elerium115's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

Welcome as short version of "you are welcome" [migrated]

Is it possible to say welcome instead of you are welcome? What would be the short response to a thank you, especially in written communication?
Saim Doruklu's user avatar

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