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0 votes
1 answer
8 views

The activity starts next week or starts from next week?

Which one is correct, the activity starts next week or starts from next week? Why? I also get a suggestion that if I say let's start (from) next Friday, people sometimes may get confused which day is ...
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Can a gerund immediately follow a present participle? [duplicate]

For example: “Academic integrity violations include any action involving distributing course materials to others.” I understand “involving” to be a present participle, because it functions as an ...
-1 votes
1 answer
39 views

What is the meaning of "Malik associates with artists"? (There are four options) [closed]

Malik associates with artists. This means he: A. Thinks of him as an artist B. Spends time with an artist C. Sometimes does business with artists D. Works across the street from some artists I am ...
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
30 views

Is the omission of "that has" in this sentence grammatically correct?

there's a discussion going on about a challenge description in a video game community I'm in and I'm not sure if it's technically grammatically correct or not. The description goes: "Celebrate ...
  • 1
-1 votes
0 answers
37 views

How to hyphenate the “coroutine” [duplicate]

How to hyphenate the word “coroutine” (without the dash)? And why this way? The freely available online dictionaries (e.g., m-w) do not provide any hyphenation or do not know the word at all.
2 votes
3 answers
51 views

What is it called when a range of two opposites is used to describe everything? (both great and small, both good and evil, both body and soul, etc.)

What is the literary term for a construction that coordinates two opposites or complementary ideas to describe a whole and everything in between? Both great and small, both good and evil, both body ...
  • 51
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

What is a better phrase than "seeking treatment"? [closed]

Suppose I am taking medicines for a chronic illness. A method to state this is I am seeking treatment for my illness. Is this a correct way to state the situation? If yes, the use of the word "...
  • 1
2 votes
0 answers
37 views

Do original languages in Greek and Hebrew Bible texts use formal or informal language where traditional translations in English used Thee and Thou? [closed]

After reading comments re: use of Thee and Thou vis-a-vis accuracy of translations to modern (not Elizabethan) English, all very informative, I am still wondering if the original texts of Hebrew and ...
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

Which one is correct? 'at a table' or 'on a table' [closed]

Which one is correct? I served food on a table I served food at a table Are the prepositions (on and at) in these sentences (1 & 2) the same?
0 votes
1 answer
49 views

Why there's a "get" in this sentence? [closed]

I've been playing a game called gta San Andreas, and there's a part that the officer talks "so, What else you got shaking' Carl" I've already known the meaning of this sentence, but I'm in ...
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

What's a word for when you were right about something- but you wish that you had been wrong? [closed]

I'm looking for a word that describes the feeling of being right, but wishing that you had been wrong. Is there such a word?
0 votes
2 answers
35 views

What is the meaning of this sentence about analytic papers? [closed]

The authors, Yale professors Richard Nelson and Sidney Winter, were best known for a series of intensely analytic papers exploring Schumpeterian theory that even most PhD candidates didn't pretend to ...
-2 votes
1 answer
31 views

How to hyphenate “coroutine”? [closed]

How to hyphenate the word “coroutine”? And why?
0 votes
0 answers
6 views

What is one English Word for Both: Dorsal and Ventral [migrated]

So "ventral" means front of the body and "dorsal" means back of the body, or anterior and posterior. Now working in a medical field I have an application for BOTH. For example a ...
-2 votes
0 answers
27 views

Used 2 times = 2 uses? [closed]

Something is used 2,3,... etc. times. Like a voucher on a website. You can see how many people used this voucher since it's published. "2 people used it" or "Used 2 times" Can you ...
  • 49
5 votes
4 answers
457 views

A word for when something borrows heavily from a predecessor

I'm looking for a word which I've seen used most often when describing works of music, art or literature. I thought the word was "diminutive" but that appears to be incorrect. I am not ...
3 votes
9 answers
645 views

Idiom for willingly turning your back on the past

I need an idiom to express the action of voluntarily cutting off from the past in a way that you cannot return to that former way of life even if you wanted to. Like an addict voluntarily cuts with ...
  • 22.7k
2 votes
3 answers
55 views

Does anyone know the word for this situation? [duplicate]

The situation is when a writer's verbosity obscures meaning. For example, legal books use center-embedding and unnecessary phrases which can be written simpler. This phenomenon only further confuses ...
  • 21
-1 votes
1 answer
26 views

Could anyone explain this theme [closed]

Theme: Innovative new age processes This topic is for making a poster. I don't think I've found the right meaning for this topic. (The topic is related to engineering)
0 votes
2 answers
55 views

Can a train or a railway line "enter operation"?

I have come across the article Learning from Las Vegas: what the Strip can teach us about urban planning and saw this sentence, "the Las Vegas monorail that entered operation in 2004 has had to ...
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Will the model contact provided after the shooting? [closed]

Will the model contact provided after the shooting? Is it after the "photo" shoot, or shooting? Or do we need to use the past tense presumably after the "shot"?
2 votes
1 answer
39 views

How are attributive suffixes like "-ean" in "Shakespearean" created?

Words like: Orwellian, Socratic, Shakespearean, Marxist, elephantine are all adjectives that mean "relating to or characteristic of root noun", but the derivational suffixes applied to the ...
  • 2,950
3 votes
4 answers
1k views

What do you call someone who likes things specifically because they are bad or poorly made?

I’ve noticed many people who seem to take pleasure in poorly made or the lowest quality things. There’s a certain level of humor to it, but is there a word that would specifically describe this kind ...
  • 31
-1 votes
1 answer
38 views

What does the lady say at the begining of this video? [closed]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSZ_t35cTKI What does the lady say in this videos? first 10 seconds
5 votes
2 answers
67 views

What is the term for using a famous person's name to describe another person? [duplicate]

Names of exceptional people are sometimes used colloquially to describe other people. The most prominent example is referring to someone ironically as "Einstein" or "an Einstein," ...
0 votes
0 answers
5 views

What is the difference between take somebody to do something and take somebody to something? [migrated]

Which one is correct ? She took me to a doctor. She took me to see a doctor. What confuses me is the 'verb' after 'to', I have checked Google, no one uses 'take ....to do something', they just use ...
-1 votes
0 answers
32 views

Can someone explain me what's the meaning of the word "shake" here? [duplicate]

The sentence: "So what else you got shaking carl?" Well the word shake here does not make any sense, it's a specific slang or what?
-1 votes
0 answers
41 views

Is "analogue to" correct? [closed]

Is it correct English to write in a scientific paper the following? Analogue to [SOURCE] we ... Here a full sentence in case it helps (but all I want to know is if "analogue to" is correct): ...
9 votes
3 answers
877 views

What is the meaning of the expression "sling a yarn"?

I am quoting from The Return of Sherlock Holmes, Black Peter: See here, mister, said he, I make no complaint of being man-handled in this fashion, but I would have you call things by their right ...
  • 647
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

"What is it(,) to be a hero?"

My friend and I have gotten into a rather passionate debate about whether Karen Paige's monologue at the end of season two of Daredevil was written in a grammatically correct fashion. On screen, we ...
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
28 views

"I am curious what you think" or "I am curious about what you think"? [migrated]

"What you think" is the object in the sentence, while what is a pronoun, so it should be "I am curious about something", not "I am curious something"?
-1 votes
1 answer
47 views

She will be taking off this week for classes for holiday [closed]

She will be taking off this week for classes for holiday. There are too many phrases in English. Especially, some Chinese will directly translate the meaning from one language to another. Take off ...
0 votes
2 answers
44 views

Usage of optimism

Optimism usually suggests a positive, hopeful attitude. However, does it always have to be related to a silver lining in a cloud? For example, James got fired from his job. Look on the bright side! ...
  • 3
-1 votes
0 answers
16 views

A lot of people take taxi to visit relatives and friends' houses [migrated]

It's always confusing when 2 nouns join together, and there's another noun before it. Which noun shall we put the "s", for the plural form, or both? A lot of people take taxi to visit ...
0 votes
0 answers
15 views

What does the phrasal verb "fill out" mean in this sentence? [closed]

Sentence: "Hey, don't worry about it, Ill fill it out later" I'm trying to understand a sentence on the intro cutscene of GTA San Andreas when Tenpenny seizes CJ's money and then Pulaski ...
-3 votes
3 answers
72 views

What does cynical actually mean?

The dictionary definition of cynical is: believing that people are motivated purely by self-interest; distrustful of human sincerity or integrity However, there is an additional bullet point under ...
  • 3
0 votes
4 answers
52 views

Word that means to overcomplicate or dress up a simple observation

I am looking for a word that means overcomplicating a simple point. Essentially I need a verb for the word jargon. The sentence I am trying to fit in in is: "These discussions, couched in the ...
  • 83
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

How confident is confident?

I'd always thought that "sure" and "certain" were close to synonymous, both meaning absence of doubt (with "certain" in a slightly higher register, and maybe a bit ...
  • 71
4 votes
3 answers
102 views

How should we describe the largest group in a set when its share accounts for less than 50%?

General idea What is the best way to describe a group that has the largest share of something but doesn't have more than 50%? I'm tempted to use the word "most", but I mentally associate it ...
  • 141
0 votes
1 answer
69 views

What does "bang" mean in this phrase?

The sentence: I thought you said you was innocent, Carl? That you don't bang? I'm playing a game that this word appears, and I want to know in a gang context what does that word mean, can someone ...
-2 votes
1 answer
21 views

Need Clarification on Simile, Metaphor and Personification [closed]

I am doing an English exam past paper and am a bit confused by the answer in the mark scheme. The passage that I have to analyse is as follows: The question is: The mark scheme gives the following ...
  • 175
22 votes
18 answers
7k views

What's a word that means "once rich but now poor"?

I'm looking for a one-to-two word adjective that describes a person that was once rich, but after several unfortunate events has much less money. However, the person is not suffering, but the person ...
  • 221
8 votes
5 answers
6k views

Is "Good boy!" still appropriate for a child?

I have a neighbor who is a non-native in English. When she sees my little son playing around, she often exclaims: "Good boy! Goooood boooy!" It always feels inapropriate. This phrase seems ...
-1 votes
1 answer
24 views

Could you please tell me the differences between the following sentences? [closed]

I went to the supermarket two days back. I went to supermarket in two days. I went to the supermarket ten times in two days. I went to the supermarket ten times two days back. I went to the ...
  • 1
0 votes
2 answers
51 views

Can “missed” be followed by “to”? [duplicate]

I got a text which had me thinking about the use of the verb "to miss" The workpaper is incomplete as I missed to consider a criteria. Is the above sentence correct? Is "I missed to ...
  • 9
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

This isn't a (blank) as much as it is a (blank) [migrated]

Can anyone tell me what this means and can you please give an example of how to use it? My teacher used it earlier today, and I still don't get it.
-1 votes
3 answers
90 views

What do you call someone who refuses to accept the limitations of their old age? [closed]

I need a term that describes someone who refuses to give up dangerous things they did when they were young despite knowing that their body cannot keep up with it anymore due to their old age. ...
  • 15
2 votes
1 answer
38 views

Can 3 items work in tandem with each other?

Is the word tandem strictly used for 2 things working together or can it also apply to 3 things working together? For example is it correct to say "Advertising, pricing, and consumer preference ...
  • 123
0 votes
1 answer
36 views

Constructing an active verb out of a passive word [closed]

Consider the following words: capture: to take captive, to gain control of especially by force; to gain or win especially through effort captive: taken and held as or as if a prisoner of war; kept ...
  • 964
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Definition of Pick-ups in terms of attractions [closed]

I wondered what the meaning of "pick-ups" is in this case. Below is a screenshot from the website (https://tcv.roppongihills.com/en/enjoy/intro/) of a famous attraction in Tokyo.

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