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Deck as verb and the accompanying preposition

As per Cambridge dictionary and others, the word 'deck' in its verb form means to decorate or add something to something to make an effect: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/deck ...
-1 votes
0 answers
4 views

Help Us Choose the Perfect English Name for Our Chewy Potato Bread!

friends! We are GamjaBatt, a lovable Korean bakery brand! 🥔 ("Gamja" means potato and "Batt" means field in Korean.) As passionate foodies and agriculture enthusiasts, we are ...
0 votes
3 answers
39 views

Is there a better word for 'anonymity' here?

This is the sentence: The Festival was the reason he had chosen this place to enter the country, the safety and 'anonymity' it provided would make his further travels much smoother. Some context: ...
1 vote
5 answers
547 views

Your health and well-being are of paramount concern to us. What does 'of' mean here?

I received an email from a university and am a bit confused about the sentence below: As you’re aware, your health and well-being are of paramount concern to us as we look to adopt the latest ...
0 votes
1 answer
19 views

What does it mean to "drop one's line of sight"

In the wake of the Donald Trump assassination attempt several bloggers are referring to this tweet by a former secret service agent. He is explaining why the snipers did not take out the attacker ...
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

Past Perfect or Simple Past When Using Since in Reported Speech?

While reading The Beautiful and Damned, I stumbled upon a passage that caught my attention. It stated, Only with the flow through the transmitter of his own familiar but faintly impersonal tone did ...
14 votes
3 answers
72k views

Is it appropriate to use "Hey yourself"?

I've heard this phrase in a couple of movies, it was being used like this: -Hey, John! -Well, hey yourself, Mike! Sounds pretty simple, but my question is about how appropriate is it to say ...
2 votes
5 answers
380 views

Formal written form for a 2x something? [closed]

In a sentence where I want to say a title or position that has been awarded twice, how do I phrase it? For instance "He was a 2x runner-up for the Champion title", would it be "two time&...
0 votes
0 answers
20 views

Phrase “In the highest”

Beyond the phrase “Hosanna In the Highest” and the song title from Becky Lucas, do you know of other uses of this phrase in everyday or literary English?
7 votes
10 answers
939 views

What is a proper word for (almost) identical products?

In my language we say "these products are analogues (of each other)" meaning they are similar to be point of being identical. For example, when procuring equipment, one may argue that we can ...
3 votes
3 answers
225 views

Is it correct to refer to Canadian geese?

The Canada goose is a migratory species which lives in northern parts of the northern hemisphere - including the Arctic, as well as temperate regions of North America and northern Europe. In winter we ...
7 votes
4 answers
67k views

"Transition to" vs. "transition into"

What is the correct phrasing: transition into vs transition to Can you explain why? Here’s the context: In partnering with us, businesses can transition to/into a digital publication etc....
4 votes
5 answers
267 views

Is the ‘t’ in ‘witch’ considered a silent t? [duplicate]

I was under the impression that because ‘witch’ ends with a /tʃ/ sound, the ‘t’ is not silent but directly represents an essential element of the pronunciation. However, a word game (the New York ...
0 votes
0 answers
11 views

Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare [migrated]

Is it correct to use a full infinitive (to do) instead of a bare infinitive (do)? I am an esl Chinese resident. And I read a comment, of which the commentator thinks I am benighted. (But I admit it's ...
1 vote
4 answers
86 views

How to quote a word in quotes [duplicate]

I want to quote a scholar's use of the term irrealis flavour. So normally I would just say: XYZ merely says that such constructions have an 'irrealis flavour'. However, the original scholar actually ...
7 votes
1 answer
587 views

"commit" a crime

How did the word "commit" become so associated with performing a criminal act ("he committed a crime", "she committed a robbery" - also generally applies to errors, ...
1 vote
1 answer
100 views

Idiomatic expressions for making sarcastic comparisons with other person: translations for ‘otra que’ or ‘ser un poroto’ [closed]

Consider this situation. I'm playing a football game and one of my teammates eludes all the opponents and scores all on his own. If he is a regular player, I would say with irony one of these two ...
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Cultural Backlash Meaning [closed]

Backlash being strong public reaction against something, what exactly is cultural backlash? Googling it is not that helpful. I was reading an article that contains the sentence: The cultural ...
0 votes
0 answers
63 views

Why are the words "mobile" and "profile" pronounced differently in American English? [closed]

Why is it like that even though both of them end in the same letters?
6 votes
2 answers
260 views

What's quasi-modal be?

What's quasi-modal be? It is not a traditional grammar term. Google says You are to be good. <=> You must be good. Other than obligation, what modalities can the quasiness refer to? What ...
5 votes
7 answers
2k views

What is a verb for "to be identical"?

What is a verb for the meaning "To be identical"? identical adjective Things that are identical are exactly the same. Collins For instance, instead of saying "Diamonds are never ...
2 votes
3 answers
7k views

What is an idiom for overcoming a life obstacle?

It's on the tip of my tongue -- something related to a tool like "to pass through a vise". The meaning is along the lines of overcoming a character-defining struggle in your life; the kind a person ...
4 votes
4 answers
4k views

Haste or no haste? That is the question

The proverb "More haste, less speed" apparently means: You make better progress with a task if you don't try to do it too quickly. Oxford Dictionary What is the difference betwen 'haste' and '...
1 vote
3 answers
20k views

What preposition is the proper one to follow the noun “hatred”?

What is the proper preposition to follow the noun hatred? Do we have a hatred for Buddhism? Do we have a hatred of Buddhism? Do we have a hatred against Buddhism? These are all just examples. It’s ...
3 votes
4 answers
6k views

Adjective meaning "that can be tied"

What is the most common adjective used to describe objects that can be tied. I would think of tieable but it does not seem to exist in the wiktionary.
8 votes
3 answers
641 views

If a word is coined / popularized / used only or mainly by second-language speakers of English, is it still considered to be an English word?

It seems that there are quite a few terms that look like English and are used in English spoken by non-fluent or fluent but nonnative speakers of English as a second language amongst themselves, but ...
2 votes
2 answers
2k views

Much more/ much less

There is a question in our grammar book that goes like this: Her husband, a plumber's assistant, earns only 300 dollars a month, which makes it very difficult for her to feed and clothe her children ...
-1 votes
1 answer
8k views

"If you was to . . ." vs "If you were to . . ."

Good day. I've been learning modal remoteness and the irrealis were, and I understand that the irrealis were is limited to 1st and 3rd person singular subjects. Now, my quesiton is, what should I use ...
1 vote
2 answers
163 views

"As I was to learn was the case with so much in Iran, everybody just turned a blind eye."

I came across a sentence while reading a book and couldn't figure out both the meaning and the structure of it at all. The sentence is: "But, as I was to learn was the case with so much in Iran, ...
0 votes
2 answers
353 views

"Rick was to ... taken.". Should it be "be" or "have"? [closed]

On my last english exam there was a question to fill in the gaps. One of the sentences to complete was "Rick was to ... taken.". What would you put in here and why? I think there should be "have", but ...
2 votes
3 answers
20k views

what is the meaning of "it was to be"?

If you are writing in the past tense, does "it was to be" have a different meaning than "it was"? e.g. "It was to be the first of many sleepless nights." vs "It was the first of many sleepless nights....
3 votes
2 answers
3k views

He was to get an ice cream, is to , was to . Be to + infinitive

Can someone explain how this works ? Is this passive ? He was to get an ice cream or He was to have done something I am to do that . Is this wrong ? How can we change these sentences without ...
6 votes
5 answers
41k views

"It is to be discussed", what is the infinitive doing in this sentence?

It is to be discussed. Is be + infinitive forming the future tense here? You are to be dressed and ready by 8:00. I was thinking it's almost commanding (or speaking of a command) but this doesn'...
2 votes
2 answers
8k views

"If I am to pick a favourite" or "If I were to pick a favourite" [closed]

I will try to keep it short and simple. How do you answer the question if this was asked as a question in person - “What is your favorite song?” I want to say I have many but if I had to select one,...
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

Does (be to bear) _sound natural to you or it does old-English? [closed]

Hi, I found this image, I don't know if it is correct or a common structure to say; I am to buy a guitar he is to pay me back she is to marry me does this structure show a kind of future tense? by the ...
1 vote
0 answers
31 views

Meaning of the structure [be + to + verb] in this context

I’m trying to understand the meaning of “whom they are to admire” in this long sentence: From these causes it results that the advocates of drastic reform divide themselves into opposing schools, ...
1 vote
2 answers
3k views

The modal verb Be to

Is this sentence correct? I am to win the competition. With this sentence I want to say that I must win the competition.
0 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is basic use of "be to" [closed]

I would like to know what is the basic use of "be to" mainly in reference to the present or future. Any suggestion is highly appreciated. like: How is this to be avoided? You are to come ...
6 votes
2 answers
5k views

What do you call 'be-to' constructions and are they acceptable English?

Consider the following examples: You have to be really patient if you are to go shopping in the afternoon. It must be active if it is to record the film. What is the construction in bold ...
1 vote
3 answers
496 views

"Was to have" expression

In 1958, Evans joined Miles Davis's sextet, where he was to have a profound influence. What is the meaning of "was to have" here?
3 votes
3 answers
17k views

"Was to " vs "was to have "

What is the difference in the meaning between following sentences: John was to have picked strawberries yesterday but the downpour made the field too muddy. John was to pick strawberries yesterday ...
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Wish + tense agreement + subordinate clause

I wish I knew what he did/does for a living I wish I knew what he had/has bought her I wish I knew what he would/will do in this case I wish I'd known what he had done for a living I wish I'd known ...
1 vote
1 answer
21 views

"I", "I'd" and "I had" questions [duplicate]

I wanted to know if the sentence "I wish I understood." is correct. I couldn't find any similar uses online, I always find uses with anothers words or "I'd" or "I had" ...
6 votes
2 answers
6k views

What's the origin of the phrase "bubble gum and shoe strings"

I'm not entirely sure if the idiom should be "bubble gum and shoe strings" or "bubble gum and matchsticks"; however from the context it looks like it refers to a cheaply done repair job, which may be ...
5 votes
5 answers
265 views

Does this meet the definition of a gennel?

In this now-deleted question, I posted the following shot from Boys from the Black Stuff: Being from Sheffield I've always considered this a gennel (more popularly known as a ginnel elsewhere in ...
0 votes
3 answers
2k views

Word for morally negative sexual behavior

I'm searching for a broad word that is summarized by sexual transgression. Is there a single word to describe a type of behavior of those that pursue rape, pedophilia, adultery, incest, or molestation?...
3 votes
4 answers
4k views

What is the gender-neutral way of saying “gentlemen’s agreement”?

How can we refer to a gentlemen's agreement in a gender-neutral way in English? In Spanish we use palabra de honor meaning “word of honor”, which carries no assumption about anyone’s sex.
1 vote
1 answer
4k views

"Meet me" VS "Meet you"

As a student of the English language, I have always considered the meanings of such phrases as I'll meet you... and You'll meet me... to be identical in nature, since the verb meet tends to be ...
-1 votes
3 answers
1k views

Using term their vs our in a marriage invitation letter

I recently happened to see an invitation letter as follows Mrs X and Mr Y cordially invite your esteemed presence and blessings with your family on the auspicious occasion of the marriage of their ...
0 votes
0 answers
6 views

Negative "not" in the clause [migrated]

Is there any difference between clauses below? Wouldn't he help you? Would he not help you? I saw the second clause in the PS1 game "Front mission 3". I sometimes think that games are not ...

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