All Questions

9,012 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1
vote
0answers
44 views

What is the meaning of 'but' in this sentence?

What is the meaning of 'but' in this sentence? "Remember the lady who moved across the hall? So I get into the elevator today and who else gets in but her!" What does the 'but' mean here, and how ...
1
vote
0answers
359 views

Meaning of "your person"

Please elucidate the meaning of this quote by Immanuel Kant- "so act as always to treat man, both in your person and that of another, as an end and never solely as a means". What's the meaning of "...
1
vote
0answers
165 views

Is "they do also" acceptable US English grammar?

I wrote the following sentence recently: These ongoing costs bring benefits of auditability, security, and convenience for users, but they do also increase complexity and running costs. Google ...
1
vote
0answers
80 views

Is "she was peeled an orange (by me)" unacceptable in English?

Is "she was peeled an orange (by me)" unacceptable in English when 'she' is interpreted as an intended recipient? I found Kay (1996: 11-12) claims that "I'll peel you an orange" has two possible ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Term for parking note left by driver in advance

In Russia it is common to leave a note with your name and phone number in a car visible to outsiders, when you park for a short time in a place you are not familiar with or when you have to park in ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Difference among You never change. and You change never. and Never do you change

I think "You never change." is the most usual and basic. But "You change never." is also well used in spoken English. "Never do you change." is almost never seen on books ...
1
vote
0answers
240 views

On / with a low budget

I've got this piece of my text: In my humble opinion, a movie can be just as good and entertaining on a low budget with certain key elements. Is it correct to say 'on a low budget' or it's better ...
1
vote
0answers
26 views

Usage of 'Both'

" Innocence is courage and clarity both." I heard this sentence. Is it correct?
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Is it actually incorrect to follow certain verbs with a that-clause?

I found a webpage saying certain verbs are followed by infinitives rather than that-clauses. However, is it actually incorrect to use a that-clause with certain verbs, for example, with the verb "...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

/dʒ/ sound in engineer and job

Why /dʒ/ sound in engineer and job is so different. The example for engineer, its sound likely /ʒ/ than /dʒ/ https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/engineer The example for job https:...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Use singular or plural noun after "at least one"?

I am wondering which sentence is correct: I guess there is at least one apple in the bag. I guess there are at least one apples in the bag. It seems to me that the first one sounds better. But I am ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Using a verb like 'to finish' with different nouns

Here is an example: I finished lunch. I finished shower. Why is 2 incorrect? What is the difference between these two nouns that makes the grammar different?
1
vote
0answers
26 views

How to reffer to Planet Earth using just "Planet"?

Could you please advice should i add 'the' before planet when referring to our planet Earth? And should the words "the" and "planet" be capitalized? So is the sentence written in the following way: "...
1
vote
0answers
47 views

Is there any idiom or expression for someone who gets something without any kind of effort?

Is there any idiom or expression for someone who gets something without any effort? like a guy got a job without doing anything.. I want a idiom by which i can mock him
1
vote
0answers
85 views

Is 'a ... lot' derogatory?

From this question, here is a quote from The Adventure of the Solitary Cyclist by Conan Doyle, published in 1903: The landlord further informed me that there are usually week-end visitors—‘a warm ...
1
vote
0answers
104 views

Is there a synonym for "flunky" that specifically denotes a failed student at university?

Am searching for a term to denote a person who has failed within a university, ie. someone who could not excel in his or her course of study. Not a dropout, per se, or someone who simply could not ...
1
vote
0answers
175 views

Does "to tell apart" require "from" or "and"?

Which of the following sentences are incorrect and why? Is it okay to use "and" in these phrases? And should "apart" be moved to the end of the sentence? How to tell apart a raven from a crow? How to ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Why is it Orthodontics but Pedodontia?

Similarly we also have words like Periodontia and Exodontia and Endodontia (and Endodontics too apparently) and for many of them, I just can not find which one is correct?
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Using present perfect in recent past question?

The recent water crisis in Johannesburg ____ global attention. A) gained B) has gained I think both of the answers are correct. Because it's talking about the recent past then has gained can be used....
1
vote
0answers
48 views

What are the differences in sentence meaning caused by the placement of 'not' in these two sentences?

I'm translating a sentence of character dialogue from Japanese to English, and came up with two possible translations for the final sentence of the dialogue. Below is the translated dialogue. "His ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

Question on using "be worth"

It's worth visiting London. London is worth visiting. Visiting London is worth it. It's worth it to visit London. Are all these sentences grammatically correct? Do they have the same meaning? Which ...
1
vote
0answers
72 views

intransitive verbs which become transitive if their "goal/purpose" is accomplished

I've realized many verbs follow an interesting transitive pattern, which I illustrate with an example: Webster's defines wrangle as either intransitive dispute, argue or transitive to obtain by ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

by (the) way: incidentally

Microsoft® Encarta® 2009. defines incidentally as by way: used to introduce additional information such as something that the speaker has just thought of by chance: by chance or by accident Is the ...
1
vote
0answers
73 views

The Middle English infinitive form

Why do the Middle English words, that stay after "to" haven't got the Middle English infinitive ending "n"? Wycliffe's Bible Luke.16:3 Studylight: "And the baili seide with ynne him silf, What ...
1
vote
0answers
60 views

The grammar of '... produces so much more wealth than there are useful things to spend it on that we have to spend it on ...'

There is a sentence in Longman Advanced Grammar sduty section 2. Technological capitalism produces so much more wealth than there are useful things to spend it on that we have to spend it on ...
1
vote
0answers
67 views

Do American natives pronounce t of at in "at any ..." as FLAP T?

According to the American Accent rules, any T is pronounced as FLAP T when it comes in between two vowels that may be in a word or in between two words like "at any".... So, Do American natives ...
1
vote
0answers
185 views

A word to describe the desire to climb a mountain

I'm looking to find a way to describe the feeling of seeing a mountain and thinking, I want to climb to the very top of that in one word. I know it is a common feeling but there does not appear to be ...
1
vote
0answers
58 views

The use of 'how could ...' in past tense situations

A grammatical issue has been bugging me for some time, and I just can't seem to wrap my head around it. If I'm writing in the past tense and questioning the ability to do something or the possibility ...
1
vote
0answers
55 views

What is the name of this type of adjective?

Okay, I've been wondering this for a while. There's a specific type of adjective, and it seems to me that it should have a name, but I'm not sure if it does. It's the class of adjectives that can be ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

He told me he often felt like he can reach me faster than his own wife - proper past tense?

What I want is to put this into past tense: He often feels like he can reach me faster than... (e.g. his own wife) 1) "He told me that he often felt like he was able to reach me faster than ...",...
1
vote
0answers
447 views

Is the dated meaning of brick as a good, reliable person ever used outside the expression "to be a brick"?

I first came across the expression to be a brick in the spoof of Enid Blyton's Famous Five series - The Comic Strip Presents: Five Go Mad in Dorset. A few times one of the characters says to another ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

how do I express that women who visit somewhere have no distinct age specific

I want to put more in to this sentence to say about that young women, old women all visit help desk. In other words, there is no varying age change in visiting help desk services. Women seem to use ...
1
vote
0answers
81 views

The phrase "in duplicate"

What does the following statement mean ? Admit card should be submitted in DUPLICATE. a) 1 original & 1 photocopy. b) Both originals. c) Both photocopies.
1
vote
0answers
99 views

Pronunciation of /b/ before /t/ as in 'obtain'

According to dictionaries, there is a sound /b/ before /t/ in the word 'obtain': /əbˈteɪn/. To me it seems impossible to pronounce /b/ in this position. To my ear obtain sounds as /əpˈteɪn/ where /p/ ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

He promised him a noble title if Andalucia was/were conquered

I want to choose "were" because Andalucia hasn't been conquered yet - it's a hypothetical scenario calling for subjunctive. However, I see that "promised" is in past tense. If the sentence were: "He ...
1
vote
0answers
515 views

A learned scholar and the pronunciation of learned

Source: Cambridge Dictionary learned adjective fml US ​ /ˈlɜr·nɪd/ having or showing much knowledge: a learned scholar I was checking the word learned and the example sentence made me wonder if ...
1
vote
0answers
121 views

Write without using pronouns extensively

I have just started learning English as my third language and struggling to write meaningful short essay without using pronouns extensively. I read mainly non-fiction English books and perhaps that ...
1
vote
0answers
150 views

Adjunct or Argument: "The bird flew over the lake"

In the title sentence, does "over the lake" serve as an adjunct or an optional argument? Here are the tests I tried using, though they weren't very enlightening beyond giving what kind of argument it ...
1
vote
0answers
134 views

Which is correct — 'longer than it otherwise would' OR 'longer than it would otherwise'

Which of the following sentences is correct, and what is the underlying grammar rule? The roads are rough, so the journey takes a little longer than it otherwise would. The roads are rough, so the ...
1
vote
0answers
4k views

Which ones are correct? "At latest" vs "at the latest"

Had a discussion with a friend: In their (foreign) online dictionary, it defines 'at the latest' with parentheses around the article, rendering it optional. In all English dictionaries I found it ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

concerning the usage of the measurement scale "meter"

Would you answer my question? Thanks in advance. A: The meter is easier to use than the yard when the cloth is sold. B: The cloth is sold by the meter. Both examples are of my own making for ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

Can "maybe" be used in this way?

If an acquaintance of mine asks me to visit their house, can I say "Tomorrow, maybe?" to say "Maybe I can come tomorrow." in short? I think I've seen this usage before, but I'm not sure if it's ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

"thrilled to her": thrill with indirect object

The New York Times ran a [story] (https://www.nytimes.com/2019/07/27/us/politics/kamala-harris-2020-election.html?action=click&module=Top%20Stories&pgtype=Homepage) today on Kamala Harris ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

What do these three sentences imply?

What do the three sentences imply? 1) I thought I would never have been an engineer. 2) I thought I would never be an engineer. 3) I thought I will never be an engineer. Does the first ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

A question of case when referring to a floor or level of a building

Can someone please confirm whether the word should start with a capital or not when when the it is used in this context... "We are moving to Level 6, 555 Smith St" or "We are moving to Floor 6, 555 ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

How to covert "My belief was shattered by the same rock called reality" to active voice?

The Hemingway editor asks me convert all passive voices to active voices. Is it recommended to do that 1. in all cases 2. in this case Why is it stressed that we use active voice?
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Is there a word in English that express that something though less would suffice the need by the grace of God

Is there a word in English to substitute barka in the Arabic language to mean that though something is less but can be sufficient by the grace of Allah or God. For example: you have made a meal for ...
1
vote
0answers
56 views

Constructions "be but one" vs "but + pronoun"

I've seen these constructions several times and I've found the following definitions (correct or confirm the definitions): but + noun/pronoun = except She gave the presents to everyone but me = She ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

Word for giving a name to something to legitimize it

Is there a word or logical fallacy for describing the action of giving something a name to legitimize it? Here's a simple example: Alice: Your jeans are too tight Bob: No, they're slim jeans The ...
1
vote
0answers
60 views

Can "to fly on" be used to mean "to land"?

Can "to fly on" be used to mean "to land"? Here are two examples: (1) "The Navy has traversed a long and complicated road in trying to develop a UAS that would fly on and off ...

15 30 50 per page
1
34 35
36
37 38
181