All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
2answers
846 views

In what case you would say “I speak things” instead of “I say things”?

In what case you would say "I speak things" instead of "I say things"?
9
votes
4answers
22k views

What's the difference between “successive” and “consecutive”? [closed]

What's the difference between "successive" and "consecutive"?
11
votes
5answers
47k views

What's the difference between “to confirm” and “to verify”?

What's the difference between "to confirm" and "to verify"?
5
votes
3answers
4k views

“After a fashion”

What is the meaning of the phrase "after a fashion"? I take it that the word fashion has different connotations here than its usual meaning.
2
votes
1answer
405 views

What's the difference between “to herald” and “to announce”?

What's the difference between "to herald" and "to announce"?
1
vote
0answers
834 views

Interesting sentences in English language [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Awkward sounding but grammatically correct sentences? The following sentence is one eminent speaker "It is difficult to use, three times consecutively, in a sentence the word ...
3
votes
1answer
965 views

What's the difference between “drivel” and “nonsense”? [closed]

What's the difference between "drivel" and "nonsense"?
4
votes
1answer
4k views

What's the difference between “shrouded with” and “covered with”?

What's the difference between "shrouded with" and "covered with"? Any different hues of meaning here?
5
votes
2answers
6k views

What is an “anecdote” as opposed to a “joke”?

I've always thought that an anecdote was a short funny story that had actually never happened, but was rather created by common people in order to satirize, ridicule or to laugh at someone. But ...
9
votes
4answers
20k views

How does 'give it up for …' mean 'clap for …'?

Well, now I understand that this is so, but the first few times I heard this, I had no idea what 'giving it up' meant. What is the derivation? How do you get from 'giving it up' to 'clapping'?
5
votes
5answers
7k views

What's the difference between “to frighten” and “to scare”?

What's the difference between "to frighten" and "to scare"? I've heard both, but have never been able to figure out the difference.
40
votes
11answers
28k views

What does “it” refer to in “it's raining”?

I wanted to leave the question title as is so as not to take away from my amusement :). Anyway, It's raining. What is raining? Is it the sky? The clouds? The weather? The rain? What is "it"? Any ...
21
votes
2answers
35k views

“Deployed to” vs “deployed on”

Which one of the following statements is correct: I deployed something to the test server. I deployed something on the test server.
11
votes
3answers
362 views

What is the standard of proof in etymology?

In this question the idea I put forward as a possible etymology for "ta" garnered the response that it is a well known false etymology for the word. That got me to wondering - being strictly a dabbler ...
4
votes
2answers
13k views

Etymology for the phrase, “on a lark.”

What is the etymology for the phrase, "on a lark" or "for a lark?"
2
votes
2answers
546 views

Amnesty — meaning

Which of the following is the most accurate meaning for the word amnesty? a general pardon to prisoners of war a general pardon of political offenders I am aware that maybe neither is accurate, but ...
13
votes
5answers
3k views

How do you tell when you're reading a poor translation?

John Ciardi, in his foreword to his translation of Dante's Divine Comedy, observes that any translation is, at best, a failure. He means it is impossible to convey the depth and levels of meaning of ...
13
votes
4answers
139k views

“Emigrant” vs. “immigrant”

While studying one word substitution I came across these two words, what I understood till now is like this: Emigrant: One who leaves his own country to reside to another. Immigrant: A person who ...
38
votes
5answers
71k views

Why is the spelling of “pronounce” and “pronunciation” different?

Why is the spelling of pronounce and pronunciation different? If one originally did not know the spelling of pronunciation, one would when hearing it verbally deduce its spelling to be pronounciation, ...
21
votes
1answer
4k views

“The ticket is printing” vs “…is being printed”

You're standing in front of a ticket vending machine and it says "The ticket is printing". Is that correct or should it be "The ticket is being printed"? EDIT: If both are correct, which one should ...
7
votes
2answers
5k views

Position of the adverb “of course”

...which is of course zero. ...which of course is zero. Which one is preferred?
2
votes
3answers
4k views

What's the difference between “irritated” and “vexed”? [closed]

What's the difference between "irritated" and "vexed", or between "to irritate" and "to vex"?
2
votes
3answers
16k views

Which prepositions should I use after “do your best”?

I always have been having problems how to understand which preposition to use. Of course there are examples, in which the preposition is obvious. For me the problem occurs when "Do your best in/on/at ...
29
votes
6answers
189k views

“Spelt” vs. “spelled”

In the following sentence, should I say spelled or spelt: You spelt/spelled "Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis" wrong.
1
vote
2answers
301 views

“Balky”, “restive” and “stubborn” - what are the differences here?

Please, share your understanding of the hues in meanings of these three words. American English is preferred, but British input would also be appreciated.
11
votes
2answers
30k views

What's the difference between “intervene” and “interfere”?

What is the difference between intervene and interfere? I think some example would really be helpful here.
5
votes
4answers
8k views

When it came time to

When it came time to... Is the phrase technically correct, or is it an exercise of artistic license?
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “truculent” and “aggressive”? [closed]

If you don't mind, please compare them also to "belligerent" and "bellicose".
31
votes
6answers
108k views

“Electronic” vs. “electric”

Most people would refer to computers as being electronic, whereas a flashlight would be described as electric. I know the general difference (electronic devices use transistors?), but what is it ...
8
votes
7answers
17k views

Use of the superlative when only two items are present

When speaking with my mother a couple of days ago, I read to her a message I was sending to my cousin on her behalf ending with: "... the birthday of your youngest." [implying her child] She ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

What does “yield to” mean in the following sentence?

The cpu_relax() call can lower CPU power consumption or yield to a hyperthreaded twin processor.
8
votes
3answers
4k views

“drop the penny”

I was wondering what "drop the penny", "help get the penny to drop", or things similar mean? All I can understand is that it must be a metaphor. For example: simply trying to repeat things in ...
15
votes
3answers
4k views

Why the opposite meanings of the word “bollocks”?

The phrases the dog’s bollocks, the bee’s bollocks, and golden bollocks are used to mean something or someone excellent, fine, or well thought of. But if one were to say a load of bollocks, or ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

“Memorial” as a non-sad word?

Can one use the word "memorial" (noun or adjective) without the negative/sad connotation of commemoration of the dead?
10
votes
1answer
11k views

What is the origin of the phrase “and nothing of value was lost”?

What is the origin of the phrase "and nothing of value was lost"? Is this from a movie, book, or show, or did it get its start on Slashdot or some other online forum?
5
votes
2answers
232 views

Modern replacement for checking frequency tables?

What is the most up-to-date, robust, and reliable way to check verb (or other POS) frequencies in current usage? Is there any hope of an algorithm involving counting Google hits and dividing by some ...
2
votes
2answers
183 views

Easy interrogative garden path prevention

How do writers of American English inform the reader that the current sentence is a question (with all the assumptions and prosody that go with it) without sacrificing the content, format, impact, etc....
1
vote
4answers
4k views

Should I place a question mark after “Can you (just) imagine”?

I mean should I always split the sentence into two ("And can you imagine? He escaped through the window!") or I can just get away with one long sentence without a question mark at all (something like "...
9
votes
3answers
11k views

What is the difference between “ostensibly” and “probably”?

Most of the time ostensibly and probably are used interchangeably. What is the difference between these two words?
1
vote
4answers
16k views

What does *countenance* mean, and why do I have hard time remembering it? [closed]

I keep seeing this word every couple of months in NYT or Wall Street Journal (and once again, I stumbled upon the word in the article America's True History of Religious Tolerance). Every time I see ...
9
votes
3answers
5k views

“Hard” vs. “hardly”

I have always found the pronounced distinction in meaning between "studying hard" and "hardly studying" a bit amusing. What is the origin of the word hardly? How is it etymologically connected to ...
2
votes
5answers
21k views

“Put it into the refrigerator” or “Put it in the refrigerator”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should “into” be used rather than “in to,” and vice versa? I am sorry if the question is silly, but I think I heard both options spoken by native ...
5
votes
3answers
75k views

Does “within an hour” mean before, after, or both?

Does within mean before or after? Or does it mean both? For example, Do not drink or eat within an hour of these pills.
2
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the correct tense to be used in Technical Presentation most of the time?

This is more about the suggestion I am asking here. Please share your ideas/experience which will help me. I am working as a project manager and want to present most of the time about project or ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

“file name” or “name of the file”?

Which is version is correct? filename or file name helped me a little, but didn't answer my questions, please see below. program <filename> - where <filename> is the file name you want ...
32
votes
4answers
61k views

Is it “despite” or “despite of”?

Should I always use 'despite' instead of 'despite of'?
1
vote
4answers
2k views

How do I say “what technologies should be *used* in a project”?

Hey, I'd need a synonym for used in this phrase, because the meaning is from the "long term" point of view, something like: What technologies should be employed in a project for it to succeed in ...
4
votes
1answer
266 views

“not meant merely to” vs “not merely meant to”

I don't know which of the two is more correct: This site is not meant merely to determine the popularity of specific tools. This site is not merely meant to determine the popularity of ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

Deuce and trey - do any other kinds of pip cards have special names?

I was playing cards this evening and found myself referring to the deuce and the trey. I was wondering, do any of the other pip card ranks have special names?
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Repeating the consonant in many words in a sentence or phrase

In the movie 'V for Vendetta' you have for example (bold part): Evey: Who are you? V. : Who? Who is but the form following the function of what and what I am is a man in a mask. Evey: ...

15 30 50 per page