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3
votes
1answer
358 views

What does 'Reno-era' policy mean?

I saw the following sentence in today's Washington Post article. What does 'Reno-era' policy mean? It's a new word to me. Can somebody tell? Reno-era policy kept Jared Loughner off FBI gun list. ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

Can “his/her” be replaced by “his”?

Yesterday, I asked this question on Web Apps: If a Facebook user dies, what happens to the account? Actually, I wanted to ask it this way: If a Facebook user dies, what happens to his/her ...
1
vote
1answer
361 views

How could I different the subjunctive mood from wrong tense or singular from in third personal?

Here is the example, which is right? It's important he know this. It's important he knows this. It's important he has known this. or, those above all right, but express different meaning.
6
votes
3answers
21k views

How to use “if you will”

What is the proper way to use if you will? Here is an example. It's like riding a car, if you will. Is the punctuation right?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“It's important that he should know” vs. “… shall know”

Which sentence is right? It's important that he should know this. It's important that he shall know this. Is the shall/should auxiliary or modal verb?
14
votes
5answers
193k views

“Centered on” or “centered around”

I have often heard presenters talking about something centered around another thing, but it seems a bit illogical and hence improper to talk like this. Am I right about this?
14
votes
7answers
4k views

Why do signs read “wet floor”, not “slippery floor”?

Every other time I see a "wet floor" sign the following idea comes to my mind. That sign forces me through unnecessary mental effort to deduce that wet floors can be slippery. I think it's like ...
-1
votes
1answer
267 views

Do these sentences have the same meaning?

Please tell me if the following sentences have the same meaning or if there is any difference between them. I can't do this task. I didn't finish this task.
7
votes
2answers
40k views

“Can” vs. “could” in asking a question [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When do I use “can” or “could”? I am a little bit confused about asking a question: Can you please tell me my next work? or Could you please tell me my next work? ...
11
votes
3answers
601 views

Why one place on stack exchange is called “area51”?

Why this place on stack exchange is called "area51"? Is it a special idiom in English for some places where things are being developed? Does 51 have some special meaning besides being just a number?
8
votes
2answers
84k views

“Ongoing” or “on-going”

As per the title, is the proper usage "ongoing" or "on-going" when writing something such as ongoing research projects?
8
votes
2answers
8k views

Is it mandatory to use a comma before a coordinating conjunction uniting the two independent clauses in a compound sentence?

My friend and I had an argument about whether this sentence required a comma: I understand where you're coming from but I disagree. My friend insisted that there should be a comma before "but": ...
18
votes
2answers
7k views

The construction of “Known but to God”

The Tomb of the Unknown Solider has the engraving "KNOWN BUT TO GOD", as presumably no man knows his name, but shouldn't it read "unknown, but to God", as the default for everyone is "unknown", with ...
10
votes
2answers
6k views

Plural of “scheme”?

Scheme is the singular form. What is the plural of scheme?
2
votes
3answers
6k views

Is it correct: “We don’t have to go there if we don’t want to”?

Which sentences are correct? We don’t have to go there if we don’t want to. or We haven’t to go there if we don’t want to.
11
votes
3answers
21k views

Which is right: “drop-down” or “drop down”?

What is the proper way to write this term when writing product documentation? Hyphenated or not? drop down list or drop-down list?
14
votes
2answers
512k views

How to ask about one's availability? “free/available/not busy”?

Are the following equally appropriate to be used at work with a colleague or client? I don't want to be informal, but I don't have to be too formal either. Let me know when you are free so that ...
6
votes
5answers
4k views

Is verbing in “I medalled in volleyball” etc correct?

Is “I medalled in volleyball” a grammatically correct sentence? According to OED, medal is a verb and a noun. I haven't seen any usage of the word as a verb, but I am assuming the above sentence is ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“to build meaningful relationships in important areas of my life”

Should I have said "of my life" or "in my life" in this sentence: to build meaningful relationships in important areas of my life
4
votes
0answers
413 views

What is the possessive form of “what”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Which', 'whose' or something else? First of all, I'm not a native speaker so I can't rely on my intuition in this specific case. For a very long time I was ...
3
votes
2answers
10k views

Is using “as from” correct English?

Many years ago in my first job, I made the mistake of writing "as from" instead of "as opposed to" in a document. To me it seemed normal usage (I must have learnt it from somewhere) but everyone else ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“Healthcare” or “Health care”?

Healthcare or Health care ? Which one is correct?
42
votes
4answers
79k views

“Cancelled” or “Canceled”?

Cancelled or Canceled ? Which one is right? You have successfully canceled the registration or You have successfully cancelled the registration
4
votes
1answer
642 views

What's the difference between these sentences?

What's the difference between I'm going to eat my lunch and I have to go for my lunch and where can I use these sentences?
6
votes
3answers
56k views

Usage of the word “itself”

Is it correct to use the word "itself" in the following cases. I have seen many people using "itself" in the following cases I read the note yesterday itself (to mean - I already read the note ...
1
vote
3answers
13k views

“Vote goes for” vs “Vote goes to”

Do "My vote goes for…" and "My vote goes to…" have different meanings? Can they be used interchangeably?
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Using quotes when referring to word as word

In the example I did not think about using the word "about". I feel that the word, about, should be wrapped in quotes. Is that correct?
2
votes
2answers
986 views

“error” or “wrong”?

For example: What's error in this sentence? What's wrong in this sentence?
0
votes
2answers
21k views

“suggestions on” or “suggestions at”?

Example usage: I've changed the post a lot by following suggestions on the original question. Is it correct?
6
votes
2answers
6k views

Is it wrong to say “The sun's rays are primarily responsible for skin damage.”

The sun's rays are primarily responsible for skin damage. To me this sounds like it means that the primary activity of the sun's rays is damaging skin. However the intention is obviously that the ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Train approaching”

Is it correct? It's the message I see right before the metro/subway train shows up. Shouldn't it be "train is approaching" or "train approaches"?
9
votes
4answers
14k views

“End with” vs. “end in”

I'm writing up some documentation, and I'm unsure which phrase to use: Option X: Find all strings ending with foo. or Option X: Find all strings ending in foo. Are both correct? (Google spits ...
0
votes
2answers
704 views

Which is the verb of the 'that' clause?

here is the sentence: We condemn such behavior that can risk damaging a company’s brand and reputation risk or damage, which is the verb? I remember that two verb ( one verb after another) must use ...
8
votes
4answers
6k views

Why use “his” in association with the word “mankind”?

The economist Keynes in a book wrote: The power to become habituated to his surroundings is a marked characteristic of mankind. I would have used "its" instead but since English is not my mother-...
0
votes
2answers
8k views

Using “wish” to express regret in the present and in the past

I wish I have been there for the baby kicking for the first time? Could I change the sentence to I wish I was there for the baby kicking for the first time? What are the differences between the ...
3
votes
1answer
12k views

Not only… but also

Consider the following: Not only you should be able to speak but also able to write. You should be able to not only speak but also write. You should not only be able to speak but also be ...
7
votes
3answers
39k views

What does the term “crack-a-lacking” mean?

In the Gorillaz song Welcome to the World of the Plastic Beach rapper Snoop Dogg uses the term crack-a-lacking. I've done some searching and can't find a reliable source for the origin and exact ...
5
votes
6answers
8k views

Dative whom with accusative who

When I am not bound by a style that mandates otherwise, I like to use whom in dative constructions and who in accusative constructions (I am aware that English doesn't have a proper case system, but ...
56
votes
4answers
542k views

“Worse comes to worst” or “worst comes to worst”

Which is correct: worse comes to worst or worst comes to worst? The former seems more logical but the latter is what appears in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary.
2
votes
4answers
3k views

Does “develop” mean “upgrade”?

In my native language, the English word "develop" is translated to "the process to make something/somebody large/strong/big, and etc.; for example: economic development." Does develop mean upgrade?
22
votes
4answers
169k views

Should there be a comma before “though” when it occurs at the end of a sentence?

Consider I don't know how outdated it is though. Should there be a comma before though, as in the following? I don't know how outdated it is, though.
12
votes
2answers
26k views

“Should either be” or “should be either”?

Which is more correct: This rule specifies that an object should be either visible or invisible, but not partially visible. Or This rule specifies that an object should either be visible or ...
19
votes
7answers
80k views

Why is a woman's purse called a “pocketbook”?

It's not a book, and it doesn't fit in anyone's pocket. Why does my brother-in-law insist on calling his wife's purse a pocketbook? I'm interested in the etymology, and in the chronological and ...
8
votes
18answers
3k views

Is there a word meaning a problem that has to be solved in order to work on another problem?

I work in the computer trade and frequently find that when I'm assigned a problem to solve, it invariably happens that other problems need solving before I can work on the real issue. Is there a word ...
-2
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the difference between “conquered” and “won”?

What is the difference between "conquered" and "won"?
2
votes
1answer
995 views

Is “Create Product” a <Verb> + <Subject> or <Verb> + <Object>?

I am software developer and trying to develop a new language. I need to learn that basic information in English: Create Product. Update Page. Stay Here. Create, Update and Stay are verbs, of course. ...
0
votes
3answers
134 views

is that + <subject> + <verb> OR is the + <noun>

I am writing a paper and I want to criticize some other related work. I want to say that the problem of their work is that they don't support advanced composition rules. So which one is a better ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Usage of contractions like “it's” and “that's” in textbooks

Is it considered bad style to use abbreviations contractions like "it's" and "that's" (instead of spelling them out as "it is" and "that is") in a textbook or academic publication?
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Mark: outstanding (as in: not yet known)

I’m updating my tabular CV for an application and I’d like to include my master thesis even though it’s not yet finished (soon!) and marked. So I’d like to write that the mark is still outstanding but ...
7
votes
4answers
18k views

“in for a penny, in for a pound”

What does this mean? I'm English and I've never come across the meaning!

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