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4 views

Usage of the expression “too … not to”

Is it correct to say, "He is too careless not to make such a mistake," when I mean he is so careless that he made such a mistake? Thank you very much.
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0answers
5 views

Word for small chat about the speakers well being

Is there a word or expression for a small chat that is about how people are? For having a bit of context, two characters, who meet up almost on a daily basis, ask each other how they are, before ...
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0answers
12 views

What is the difference between 'I almost completed…' and 'I have almost completed…'

While having a conversation, my friend said 'I almost completed...', but when I heard that line, it sounded to me like 'I nearly did something, which I should not have done, and thank god for that' ...
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1answer
15 views

What is the actual meaning of these lines and what time (Past/Present/Future) it indicates?

These lines have been taken from Shakira's Whenever, Wherever song lyric, "Never could imagine there were only Ten million ways to love somebody". Thanks in Advance.
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0answers
14 views

What is the background of the phrase “To get one's house in order”?

I know humans used to have "Houses" comprised of people rather than structures, similar to the Klingon fashion. House of Mogh, House of John, etc. Is this house of people the house that needs to be ...
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0answers
18 views

What's word means someone who VOLUNTARILY isolates themself from society? [duplicate]

I know there are words like outcast, pariah, ostracized, leper, etc. to describe someone who is shunned by society. I’m looking for a word to describe someone who rejects society and lives detached ...
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0answers
6 views

should I write “These details belongs to my dad” or “These are my dad's details ” when writing an email? [on hold]

When writing an email should I write "These details belongs to my dad" or "These are my dad's details"? I know this sounds somewhat silly but I want to be grammatically correct.
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0answers
7 views

What's difference between “major, main, primary”? [on hold]

I hope someone, once and for all, can clarify (with examples) the difference in usage of "major,main and primary". Thank you so much
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0answers
6 views

How to use “ramble” properly? [on hold]

It it correct to say “I’m down to listen if you want to ramble about your problems?”
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0answers
5 views

What is the actual meaning of these sentences and why [on hold]

I interest in writing songs VS I'm interested in writing songs Thanks in Advance.
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1answer
34 views

What does “cold balls” exactly mean in American english?

I've been watching a crime TV anime show lately, and I've run into this fancy and maybe offensive too ( sorry about that, if it is like so ) and to put you guys in the scene context here is a summary: ...
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0answers
20 views

What to say to describe we are lost in a project? [on hold]

At work I am a member of a project that does not have project manager at the moment I want to tell my department manager that we are not on the right path and we are lost. I am not sure if the term "...
-1
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0answers
14 views

Another word for Adventurous or Fearless [on hold]

I am looking for a word or two words that describe someone who is adventurous. One who likes to be daring such as doing extreme sports like snowboarding or skydiving. Weird request but I am looking ...
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0answers
13 views

“next Monday” or “in the next Monday” [migrated]

Are both sentences below correct? I will go to the event next Monday. I will go to the event in the next Monday. I know that "next Monday" is idiomatic and I know that "on next Monday" is incorrect/...
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0answers
17 views

Sentence grammatically correct? [on hold]

"They believe that ancient man in his naivety, as he stood just a step beyond the dividing line between humanoid and human being, was confused and bewildered by all that he saw around him." Is the ...
0
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0answers
15 views

Terminology of speaking mannerism

A relative speaks in a manner I'm sure there is a phrase or terminology for that mannerism, all follow a similar format Examples: "That's not the way I would do it, but that's just me" "I'm not ...
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0answers
20 views

Is it awkward to say 'yet too dark'?

I am making my website but it is not fully finished. Therefore I set black background and printed text like this : "This place is yet too dark, please come back later." I used yet to emphasize ...
3
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3answers
39 views

List with different last item with just one “and”

I have no idea how to describe this. I run into this usage all the time in English, and to me it seems wrong, but considering how common it is, I'm wondering if it's actually accepted. Consider the ...
-1
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0answers
17 views

Colloquialisms in Translations [on hold]

Anyone else find this odd? That is, use of colloquial language, or even slang, in translated fiction. From a Japanese novel I recently read: "I'm all over it." "You can ask till the cows ...
1
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1answer
36 views

Wider width or larger width?

I'm hesitating between these two and I don't know which one is more correct: wider width or larger width?
-1
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2answers
28 views

Tactical vs Strategic [duplicate]

What's the difference in meanings between tactical and strategic? My teacher told me tactical is short term whereas strategy is related with long time ambitions. But I think otherwise that both are ...
0
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0answers
22 views

Semicolon between independent and dependent clause?

I saw the following sentence in the NY Times: “The Jarheads lost more people that day than Mr. Ribeiro’s combat unit lost in the first gulf war; so many that it had been impossible to attend all of ...
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0answers
10 views

“provided that there was no case” or “provided that there were no case”

My doubt is which of the two is grammatically correct. I'm not sure whether 'were' should be used because it is a subjunctive phrase, or if 'were' should only be used if 'cases' was plural. Thank you!
0
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0answers
27 views

How should I punctuate this sentence?

The sentence is as follows: I did not know much about the Marines, but the words “The Few. The Proud. The Marines.” peaked my interest. Do I need comma after "words?" Can I leave the period after "...
-2
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0answers
34 views

Can the verb “bridge” be transitive?

My agency name is D'Bridge Insurance Group. I want to use that as a punning reference, to say that I as an insurance agent want to connect my customers with the best insurance markets. Let us ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

Shouldn't You? or Shouldn't you be?

I am trying to decide whether the appropriate wording is: ... "Your clients are evolving. Shouldn't you?" or "Your clients are evolving. Shouldn't you be?" ... For some reason, "be" feels both ...
0
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1answer
13 views

Asking about sufficiency of a document

I want to ask about sufficiency of a document. Is this sentence applicable? Can an English abstract be enough? Is it better to use "could" instead of "can"?
0
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0answers
30 views

Is there a name for the second newspaper in a stack?

When picking a newspaper from a stack of newspapers, people usually take the one at the top of the stack. However, sometimes they will choose to take the second paper, the paper just below the top one....
1
vote
1answer
51 views

Unusual use of the word “equipped” - correct or incorrect?

A car-enthusiast website I frequent often, Bringatrailer.com, uses the word "equipped" in what seems to me like an unnatural and incorrect way. I'd like to know if their usage is correct or not. ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

Word or common short phrase for a intentionally hasty initial proposal to group?

Is there a preferred word or common short phrase (or multiple) for a proposal made to a second party or group that is merely a first draft, intentionally hasty and likely poor quality, in order to ...
0
votes
1answer
12 views

What's the correct verb to be used?

would I say: Having a suitable Tone, Pace and Volume is or are integral to ensuring excellent quality over the phone.
0
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0answers
20 views

Emoji & punctuation

I'm wondering how to punctuate around emojis. Specifically at the end of sentence. I see three possibilities: 1. Emoji before the punctuation mark I like emojis 😊. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet. ...
0
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0answers
24 views

Band of Steves?

We are starting a band where everyone's name is Steve. What is the correct use of the apostrophe in this case? Band of Steves
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0answers
24 views

What do you call a person who spotlights on the stage? [on hold]

I urgently need one-word answer for this please. Help me.
0
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1answer
24 views

Adjective of quality problem

Why is He is cowardly not correct as cowardly is acting as an adjective of quality? While He is intelligent is correct.
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2answers
32 views

The usage of “out of the box.”

I faced this sentence in a book: Ann Trason had expected to be in front, but an eight-minute mile right out of the box was just nuts. Would you please help me with the meaning? Specially, I can't ...
0
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0answers
18 views

Subject with -ian suffix is a?

Is there a word which describes the relation of, when associating or committing, an added suffix such as “-ian” (or “-ic”, et al.) to its subject? For example: “Orwellian is the _____ of/for ...
-1
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2answers
90 views

That car is the color of a ripe cherry. (How can a car be a color?)

Good day! That car is the color of a ripe cherry. "Color" is a noun that is in the same case as "car", i.e. in the subjective case. But how can it be possible? A car is a vehicle, a construction, ...
0
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0answers
10 views

Ing form as infinitive at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use the ing form as infinitive at the beginning of a sentence? E.g. learning extracurricular Software to improve personal training. This is a sentence I put in brackets in my ...
0
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2answers
33 views

“as early as”, e.g., as early as 2000…?

Which verb tense is used with "as early as"? For example, "As early as 2000, XXX was developed" or "As early as 2000, XXX had been developed"
1
vote
1answer
22 views

difference between “so the Pilgrims believed” and “and the Pilgrims believed so”

“God made his children prosperous, so the Pilgrims believed. The next autumn, that of 1621, brought bountiful harvests and with them the first Thanksgiving Day in New England. (From “The American ...
0
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0answers
18 views

Question about hyphenated words after their

I understand that when you combine two words that come before a noun they modify, they should be hyphenated. I am confused if you need to hyphenate words after the word their. For example: These ...
2
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0answers
28 views

Articles before ordinal numbers

I am a bit confused about the difference between the uses of articles in such cases. Technically, it would be logical to always use "the" for instances like "the fourth time I did this" or "the tenth ...
0
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0answers
11 views

noun + <of> + the size/etc of

1. Somebody (of) her age shouldn't do such strenuous exercises. 2. We saw a giant jellyfish (of) the same size as an adult human. 3. I have a dog (of) the size of yours. 4. A flock of ...
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0answers
13 views

Suggest a word for this meaning: [on hold]

"A thing deadly frightening but you approach it." This word can primarily refer to the "thing", "you", "this action", etc.
-2
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0answers
29 views

When to use “THE” and when to use “A”? - confused [duplicate]

So I feel that I am starting to get it, although this morning I got another curve ball, that caused some confusion. Me and my daughter were reading a book and two sentences confused me. "Chewing on ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Full stops with initials

I am not sure that there should be a full stop after the last letter when using the initials of one's full name. For example: John Peter Smith -> J.P.S. Or should it be J.P.S only?
0
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1answer
26 views

How to use nowadays in english? [on hold]

Nowadays, at the beginning or end? Which one is right? Nowadays my country or my country nowadays?
7
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3answers
560 views

What are the first usages of “thong” as a wearable item of clothing, both on the feet and on the waist?

What are the first usages of "thong" as a wearable item of clothing, both on the feet and on the waist? Tracing thongs as worn about the waist seems to lead to the Jazz Age and the "Chicago G-string",...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

'downstairs' adverb vs noun

If you say "We need some manpower tomorrow to move some of the stuff downstairs." could you mean both "moving stuff down the stairs" and "move stuff that is downstairs"? Which is the more common ...

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