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3 views

fell only a few goals short of

Goddard, an adventurer, explorer and lecturer who evidently fell only a few goals short of a boyhood list that numbered more than 100, died Friday at a Glendale hospital of complications from cancer, ...
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0answers
10 views

/dʒ/ sound in engineer and job

Why /dʒ/ sound in engineer and job is so different. The example for engineer, its sound likely /ʒ/ than /dʒ/ https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/engineer The example for job https:...
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1answer
10 views

Which is correct here, past or pass? [on hold]

Some lady just forced herself pass the gate Some lady just forced herself past the gate which is it?
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0answers
7 views

Capitalizations - Which one of the following is correct? [on hold]

Which one is correct? 1) Military Intelligence branch officer 2) Military Intelligence Branch Officer 3) Military Intelligence Branch officer
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1answer
34 views

antonym of “billable”

I am looking for the opposite of billable, the context would be "billable hours". A complete example sentence could be Sorry boss, the work I did from 9 to 10 is "not billable". While writing a ...
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0answers
26 views

What's the reason behind separable words?

Just wonder why it's like that sea gull and surprisingly another word like starfish Finally: Are each of which called as word? moreover, I know there's a reason behind being separable of 'sea ...
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0answers
21 views

Need help. Trying to make text look narutal [on hold]

I'm trying to make a text look more natural. Would you please give me any advises? Brief Instruction: Preparation and use. Before first use, wipe the entire surface of the stone with a damp cloth. We ...
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1answer
28 views

Can I use “who” after a possessive?

Example: I punched the man's nose, who cried in pain. I just feel like it's refering to the nose instead of the man, even though the meaning is clear.
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0answers
21 views

What is the definition of semantic and lexical?

I google around for the definitions of the word, yet they don't make sense. I am a foreign student and have hard time understanding google definition.
3
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0answers
32 views

Is bludgeon connected with blood or block?

Bludgeon is a short, heavy club which is thicker or loaded at one end. Both OED and Etymonline say "origin unknown". There are possible Cornish, Celtic, Dutch, cant, Middle French, Irish and Gaelic ...
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0answers
29 views

Is it correct saying “It's mine and Peter's.” in the following context? Thanks in advance

Whose car is this? It's mine and Peter's. Improving my question to show it's not duplicate! What I want to know is if it's possible using possessive pronoun + genitive case (without a noun) to ...
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0answers
17 views

Do these two expression have different meanings?

I really don't know if it's the right way to do it. or I really don't know it's the right way to do it. I think they basically have the same meaning but I would like to listen to other opinions.
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1answer
22 views

Should I use “is” or “are” between two nouns (I think) in this phrase?

I'm not really sure what I should use in this case, normally I can identify the difference but this time for some reason i cannot. sentence: "In this function stringify and parse is necessary" Is ...
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0answers
29 views

Which is the correct idiom: “of the first order” or “of the first water”?

Examples: You have to study Shakespeare because he is a poet of the first order. We need to close the highway immediately—this is an emergency of the first order. Jocelyn had proved herself to be ...
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1answer
20 views

Can we do with/without the definite article before an abstract noun?

Which is correct and why? (a) He gave us a lecture on the importance of reading books. (b) He gave us a lecture on importance of reading books. IS the definite article required before the abstract ...
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0answers
26 views

Derivative form that simplifies or localizes pronunciation

Americans sometimes say boozhy, which I am guessing was coined to simplify the pronunciation of its original, foreign form: bourgeois. There are probably other examples of the same derivative ...
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0answers
26 views

“I was hoping you were still sleeping”

Should I say: "I was hoping you were still sleeping" or "I hoped you were still sleeping?"
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0answers
20 views

How to punctuate this: The question is not “how are you”, but “who are you?”

How does one quote a question in the middle of a sentence, especially when the quotation is hypothetical (i.e., no one actually said it)? Options: The question is not "how are you," but "who are you?...
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0answers
26 views

Would you please correct this question [on hold]

The question: is there any chance for you to study in berlin I must have seen you there
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0answers
24 views

One word for a person who sees a chat and not replies?

There are peoples on instant messenger who sees a message and don't reply. Is there a word for them ?
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1answer
16 views

Should the names of methods, processes or roles be capitalized?

A question concerning capitalisation to calrify ambiguity as I've seen the words variously capitalized. Should the names of methods, processes or roles be capitalized? ( f. ex. Agile method, Sprint ...
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0answers
22 views

Which word is stressed in this sentence? “Sometimes you don't even know…” of the below video? [on hold]

Which word is stressed in this sentence in the video below? "Sometimes you don't even know..." Do you think the word "sometimes", "don't", "even" or "go" is stressed? This is the video link > ...
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0answers
20 views

letter to the accommodation officer at the college [on hold]

I am writing to inform you that I am sharing a room with one of my senior who is in 8th Standard. He attends evening classes and sleep late at night. on the other hand I have morning classes due to ...
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2answers
21 views

My/Mine to be used while writing email [duplicate]

can I use----As per mine and John's understanding we concluded that...
-2
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2answers
30 views

“Subject Matter Expert”

In the term "Subject Matter Expert" (SME), what does the qualifier "Subject Matter" mean? Are there experts without subject matter (other than perhaps Irwin Corey, the "World's Foremost Authority") ...
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2answers
53 views

What's the meaning of “to” in “Love you to”?

There's a Beatles song called "Love You To" (not To Love You nor Love You Too). I've never understood this grammar construction and I don't understand what the title actually means. Is it just a ...
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1answer
33 views

American English. Please help me identify the correct form of 'become' in the following sentence:

I'm sure we'd all rather I became a bit more self-sufficient. Using became feels right, but I would appreciate anyone who could explain what's going on grammatically here. I think become is in the ...
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0answers
9 views

Inference from a reading comprehension

The transplantation of organs from one individual to another normally involves two major problems: (1) organ rejection is likely unless the transplantation antigens of both individuals are nearly ...
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5answers
58 views

what do you call someone who doesn't want to pay for another person's skills

What do you call someone who doesn't want to pay for another person's skills? They want the best, but can't pay for it or think you charge too much because they think it is easy and cheap to do - ...
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2answers
67 views

Is it grammatical to say “this food is comfortable”?

"the food is comfortable" The person who said it meant "the food made me feel comfortable". My initial instinct was that "this food is comfortable" is incorrect. However, since "this couch is ...
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1answer
20 views

How do you address a sympathy card to an extended family?

A kid I know took his own life, to the shock of his family. I do not know them though I have their names thanks to the obituary. He and I were close friends a few years back and I still think the ...
1
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1answer
22 views

Choosing the correct form of a verb

Should we use "choose" or "choosing"? I was browsing the Internet when I stumbled upon this word play in a retailer catalog Door handles and locks: the key to choosing wisely At first the ...
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0answers
14 views

When the word “our” is unstressed, is it pronounced like /ʌɹ/ or /əɹ/?

When the word "our" is unstressed, is it pronounced like /ʌɹ/ or /əɹ/? For example: https://vocaroo.com/i/s0uXE3Gaahqm
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0answers
17 views

The submission of a plan of a mission that has at least one submission

A mission that plans a task may be structured in multiple parts. These parts can be missions. Is there a word for partial constituting missions? Maybe one of these: submission sub-mission ...
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1answer
49 views

Is the title of Randy Newman's “You've got a friend in me” Grammatically correct?

I'm a native english speaker and "you've got a friend in me" sounds correct to me but I'm having trouble figuring out exactly what kind of construction it is. Can anyone shed light on this?
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0answers
15 views

English Sentence correction [on hold]

US-China trade negotiations are now headed for a positive (1)/diection following this weekend's meetingbetween (2)/president trump and his chineese counterpart XI xinping(3)/No error ....In ...
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1answer
27 views

“one or two friends” vs “one friend or two”

For example: I'll take "one or two friends" to a party. Or I'll take "one friend or two" to a party. Do these both mean the same? If so, which one is more common?
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1answer
23 views

Present or confer?

For example, which one is more accurate in the following context? 1) The government presented a medal to him 2) The government conferred a medal to him And in general, what is the difference between ...
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1answer
30 views

Is “The eviction process coincided with the deterioration of John's, Vlad's son, health.” correct?

The eviction process coincided with the deterioration of John's health, Vlad's son. or The eviction process coincided with the deterioration of John's, Vlad's son, health. The second sentence ...
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1answer
61 views

Exact meaning of “star” for laypersons, meaning a celestial object?

I'm not a native speaker of English. The word "star", as a celestial object, is usually (or nearly always) defined as, well, e.g. the Sun, Sirius etc in dictionaries. However, it seems unnatural to ...
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0answers
23 views

Does this expression have two meanings?

This is to make the situation worse. What I'm trying to say is that doing it would be like wanting to make the situation worse. Trying to say This is to intentionally make the situation worse Not ...
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5answers
79 views

Success : Successful :: Failure : _____________

Is there an adjective to describe "full of failure(s)"? Most often heard it's that s.o./s.t. is a failure, but I'm looking specifically for an adjective. Edit: I'm looking for a word that ...
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0answers
14 views

how can i improve my writing skill? [on hold]

The diagram beneath illustrate information about honey-bee colonies and the production of honey. Overall, the number of honey-bee colonies reached a peak in 1990 then decreased slightly. There was a ...
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1answer
25 views

Board of directors vs directorial board

Which is better? Grammatically, both appear correct to me, and I normally use the former.
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0answers
17 views

When the word “while” is unstressed is it pronounced like “wəl”, “wʌl” or “wɑl”?

When the word "while" is unstressed is it pronounced like "wəl", "wʌl" or "wɑl"? https://vocaroo.com/i/s0ksGbGNUfyW
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2answers
35 views

Single word request: “universally fatal” (especially to humans) without any connotation of intentionality or evil?

Malign seems great, but it carries connotations of deliberate evil (like "malevolent"). Fatal or terminal might work, but aren't specific enough.
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0answers
37 views

To prise open the gap between price and prize

The words "price" and "prize" and "prise" are easily confused. They mean different things*. It is not a difference of writing between US and British English. Part of the confusion is that "price" ...
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0answers
21 views

Is it possible: Attend a contest but not a contestant?

Can I attend a contest to observe or to confer, but not compete for a prize (not a contestant)?
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0answers
8 views

Which word is stressed in the sentence “It's not great” of the video linked below?

Which word, the "not" or "great", is stressed in the sentence "It's not great" linked below? Because I hear the word "not" is said in highest pitch, but "great" is louder and more enegetic than "not"...
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2answers
38 views

Can “indignantly” be used in a situation where the person it's applied to is looking down on someone?

Given the following sentence, is "indignantly" used correctly: "I can't believe a filthy beggar like you would dare to even speak to us!" the lead girl in the trio indignantly shouted at him. The ...

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