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0
votes
2answers
6k views

Is there a word for people who revel in freebies?

By which I mean, people who strategically position themselves so as to acquire money/service/free stuff at the expense of another? I don't mean extortion (that's too strong a word for what I need). ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Can I use “who” after a possessive?

Example: I punched the man's nose, who cried in pain. I just feel like it's refering to the nose instead of the man, even though the meaning is clear.
0
votes
0answers
3 views

fell only a few goals short of

Goddard, an adventurer, explorer and lecturer who evidently fell only a few goals short of a boyhood list that numbered more than 100, died Friday at a Glendale hospital of complications from cancer, ...
4
votes
2answers
39k views

“How did you know?” vs. “how do you know?” distinction

When someone makes an assertion, the distinction between "how did you know" and "how do you know" seems to be that "how did you know" implies that the person in question is correct in their assertion. ...
2
votes
8answers
9k views

Good word for something physical that's inexplicable

I'm looking for a word to describe something physical, something that you can tangibly and empirically feel, but cannot see, nor sense in any other way than touch, nor explain its imperceptibility. ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

/dʒ/ sound in engineer and job

Why /dʒ/ sound in engineer and job is so different. The example for engineer, its sound likely /ʒ/ than /dʒ/ https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/engineer The example for job https:...
3
votes
0answers
31 views

Is bludgeon connected with blood or block?

Bludgeon is a short, heavy club which is thicker or loaded at one end. Both OED and Etymonline say "origin unknown". There are possible Cornish, Celtic, Dutch, cant, Middle French, Irish and Gaelic ...
-3
votes
1answer
9 views

Which is correct here, past or pass? [on hold]

Some lady just forced herself pass the gate Some lady just forced herself past the gate which is it?
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Exact meaning of “star” for laypersons, meaning a celestial object?

I'm not a native speaker of English. The word "star", as a celestial object, is usually (or nearly always) defined as, well, e.g. the Sun, Sirius etc in dictionaries. However, it seems unnatural to ...
0
votes
2answers
73 views

Name for words that may be split into two words, regardless of space placement

Is there a name for a word that becomes two words regardless of space placement? A trivial example would be the word "aa" which becomes the two orthographic (but identical) words "a" and "a" when ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

“-field” joining rule for compound words?

Is there a rule when to join a word with field and when to leave them as two separate words? Examples: I walked through a cornfield. I walked through a maize field. I walked through a ...
-2
votes
0answers
7 views

Capitalizations - Which one of the following is correct? [on hold]

Which one is correct? 1) Military Intelligence branch officer 2) Military Intelligence Branch Officer 3) Military Intelligence Branch officer
20
votes
8answers
6k views

Is “I am getting married with my sister” ambiguous?

I have seen the following sentences in a book given to us during our training period at The Regional Institute of English, Bangluru I got married to Priscilla. I got married with Priscilla ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

antonym of “billable”

I am looking for the opposite of billable, the context would be "billable hours". A complete example sentence could be Sorry boss, the work I did from 9 to 10 is "not billable". While writing a ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

What's the reason behind separable words?

Just wonder why it's like that sea gull and surprisingly another word like starfish Finally: Are each of which called as word? moreover, I know there's a reason behind being separable of 'sea ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

how to understand this sentence “unbelievably slow in appreciating their good fortune in ruling the country…”?

Here are two consecutive paragraphs from The Adventure of English by Melvyn Bragg: The extensive range of what I would call “almost synonyms” became one of the glories of the English language, ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Need help. Trying to make text look narutal [on hold]

I'm trying to make a text look more natural. Would you please give me any advises? Brief Instruction: Preparation and use. Before first use, wipe the entire surface of the stone with a damp cloth. We ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

Comma or no comma before “only”?

Sample phrase: Use the item for those purposes, only. vs. Use the item for those purposes only.
0
votes
5answers
79 views

Success : Successful :: Failure : _____________

Is there an adjective to describe "full of failure(s)"? Most often heard it's that s.o./s.t. is a failure, but I'm looking specifically for an adjective. Edit: I'm looking for a word that ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

What is the definition of semantic and lexical?

I google around for the definitions of the word, yet they don't make sense. I am a foreign student and have hard time understanding google definition.
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Are my sentences grammatically correct? [on hold]

Are my sentences grammatically correct? Did I use the proper form of verbs and countable/noncountable nouns in my sentences? in my If not, please change those sentences. You made some grammatical ...
0
votes
2answers
15k views

Difference between “admit” and “accept”

Which of the options sounds correct? She has been accepted/admitted at York University.
0
votes
0answers
36 views

To prise open the gap between price and prize

The words "price" and "prize" and "prise" are easily confused. They mean different things*. It is not a difference of writing between US and British English. Part of the confusion is that "price" ...
-2
votes
2answers
30 views

“Subject Matter Expert”

In the term "Subject Matter Expert" (SME), what does the qualifier "Subject Matter" mean? Are there experts without subject matter (other than perhaps Irwin Corey, the "World's Foremost Authority") ...
1
vote
4answers
54 views

what do you call someone who doesn't want to pay for another person's skills

What do you call someone who doesn't want to pay for another person's skills? They want the best, but can't pay for it or think you charge too much because they think it is easy and cheap to do - ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Is it correct saying “It's mine and Peter's.” in the following context? Thanks in advance

Whose car is this? It's mine and Peter's. Improving my question to show it's not duplicate! What I want to know is if it's possible using possessive pronoun + genitive case (without a noun) to ...
-1
votes
1answer
20 views

Can we do with/without the definite article before an abstract noun?

Which is correct and why? (a) He gave us a lecture on the importance of reading books. (b) He gave us a lecture on importance of reading books. IS the definite article required before the abstract ...
1
vote
1answer
125 views

Why does the word “school” contain an 'h'?

Considering the low prevalence of words in English written with the letter combination "sch", why is the word "school" written the way it is, rather than simply "scool"? As far as I could tell, the ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

In an expression of wish, desires, containing 'If' and 'had', should 'would have' necessarily come after that or simply 'would' would do fine?

Are both of these correct? "If I had to choose one, I would have to say it's red that I prefer the most among all the colours." "If I had to choose one, I would say it's red that I prefer the most ...
3
votes
3answers
732 views

Why can an adjective be placed after “eat” as in “garlic can be eaten raw”?

Edit note: This question with some good answers does not explain (or ask) why it is an adjective that's used as opposed to an adverb in this type of construction: Is this an objective complement or ...
1
vote
2answers
230 views

When is the object of a verb the subject of the gerund in structure “subject + verb + object + preposition + gerund”?

1) This reminds me of climbing Ben Nevis years ago. 2) I told you about losing my credit card, didn't I? I'm quite sure that the person who climbed Ben Nevis is "I" not "This" in 1). But, I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
22 views

Should I use “is” or “are” between two nouns (I think) in this phrase?

I'm not really sure what I should use in this case, normally I can identify the difference but this time for some reason i cannot. sentence: "In this function stringify and parse is necessary" Is ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

Do these two expression have different meanings?

I really don't know if it's the right way to do it. or I really don't know it's the right way to do it. I think they basically have the same meaning but I would like to listen to other opinions.
6
votes
3answers
2k views

How to analyze “dearly beloved”?

I'm curious about the phrase “dearly beloved”. – It looks to me to be a phrase consisting of an adverb (dearly) modifying a noun (beloved). But I thought adverbs could only modify verbs or adjectives? ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Derivative form that simplifies or localizes pronunciation

Americans sometimes say boozhy, which I am guessing was coined to simplify the pronunciation of its original, foreign form: bourgeois. There are probably other examples of the same derivative ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Which is the correct idiom: “of the first order” or “of the first water”?

Examples: You have to study Shakespeare because he is a poet of the first order. We need to close the highway immediately—this is an emergency of the first order. Jocelyn had proved herself to be ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Is it grammatical to say “this food is comfortable”?

"the food is comfortable" The person who said it meant "the food made me feel comfortable". My initial instinct was that "this food is comfortable" is incorrect. However, since "this couch is ...
-1
votes
2answers
37 views

Can “indignantly” be used in a situation where the person it's applied to is looking down on someone?

Given the following sentence, is "indignantly" used correctly: "I can't believe a filthy beggar like you would dare to even speak to us!" the lead girl in the trio indignantly shouted at him. The ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

What's the meaning of “to” in “Love you to”?

There's a Beatles song called "Love You To" (not To Love You nor Love You Too). I've never understood this grammar construction and I don't understand what the title actually means. Is it just a ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

“I have told” vs “I have been telling” (past participle or past continuous)?

I have no clue about the difference between "have p.p" and "have been -ing". Could you please explain the difference in detail to me..? ====== I keep telling everyone that whose fault it was and ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

“I was hoping you were still sleeping”

Should I say: "I was hoping you were still sleeping" or "I hoped you were still sleeping?"
0
votes
0answers
20 views

How to punctuate this: The question is not “how are you”, but “who are you?”

How does one quote a question in the middle of a sentence, especially when the quotation is hypothetical (i.e., no one actually said it)? Options: The question is not "how are you," but "who are you?...
-3
votes
0answers
26 views

Would you please correct this question [on hold]

The question: is there any chance for you to study in berlin I must have seen you there
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Choosing the correct form of a verb

Should we use "choose" or "choosing"? I was browsing the Internet when I stumbled upon this word play in a retailer catalog Door handles and locks: the key to choosing wisely At first the ...
-1
votes
0answers
22 views

One word for a person who sees a chat and not replies?

There are peoples on instant messenger who sees a message and don't reply. Is there a word for them ?
-2
votes
1answer
16 views

Should the names of methods, processes or roles be capitalized?

A question concerning capitalisation to calrify ambiguity as I've seen the words variously capitalized. Should the names of methods, processes or roles be capitalized? ( f. ex. Agile method, Sprint ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Which word is stressed in this sentence? “Sometimes you don't even know…” of the below video? [on hold]

Which word is stressed in this sentence in the video below? "Sometimes you don't even know..." Do you think the word "sometimes", "don't", "even" or "go" is stressed? This is the video link > ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

What are possible semantics of participle constructions?

Consider a participle constrution A being B, C happens. What are the possible semantic relations between the parts? Which of them is/are the most likely one(s)? And can one even be sure which ...
5
votes
3answers
139 views

Is there a word for Negative Nostalgia

Nostalgia is generally positive memories (sometimes through rose colored glasses) of past events. Is there a word for the surfacing of negative/unhappy feelings/memories? So for example, one might ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Is it poor form to paraphrase well known authors in dialogue? [migrated]

Sometimes a situation will suit a well known author's quote and I do like expressions. Someone joked that I had no shame in paraphrasing. Is this poor form and if so why?

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