All Questions

0
votes
0answers
3 views

Comma sense: Grammar and Usage Case

Working on a sentence that's bothering me: After a few minutes, a thin blue-eyed girl, wearing black stockings and wrapped tightly in a silver mink, kicked over the can with her white tennis shoe. ...
0
votes
1answer
8 views

Charabanc Caravan

The words ‘caravan’ and ‘charabanc’ have different etymological derivations. But as they can both mean a form of transport, is it possible that ‘charabanc’ was deliberately coined to sound a bit like ‘...
-1
votes
0answers
14 views

What is the grammatical explanation of the expression “F*** you!” and its derivatives?

I heard that expression along with its derivatives so many times, in movies or otherwise, but I can't get it grammatically, meaning, does it stand for a complete sentence like "I will fuck you!" or "I ...
-2
votes
0answers
8 views

whats the meaning of this

here whats the meaning of "pimp"; There was something shockingly awkward about discussing Stuart’s breakup with his mom. The expression is: a boy’s best friend is his mother. It’s not: a boy’s best ...
-1
votes
1answer
27 views

What does 'Hit for Six' mean

I was wondering what the english phrase 'Hit for six' meant.
0
votes
1answer
12 views

Asking a question “did you use to…?” when we don't know whether person still have that habit or not?

“used to“ implies habitual actions is the past that is not valid now. How about questions “did you use to...?” Could we ask such questions when we want to learn about habits in the past BUT we aren't ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Why is a private school called “public school” in the UK?

Public school seems to have contradictory meanings, depending on the region you use the term: (in the UK) a private fee-paying secondary school, especially one for boarders. (chiefly in North America)...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

What does the phrase 'proverbial couch' mean?

I'm reading a book in English. About emotional intelligence. When I encountered the "Proverbial Couch" phrase, I really got frustrated because I could not find the meaning in any of the dictionaries. ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

What is the difference between “make it up to” and “make amends”?

It seems both "make it up to" and "make amends" have same meaning. Is there any difference?
0
votes
0answers
13 views

'will be V-ing' vs. the present progressive [for future reading]

The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (Page 171-2): [22] i When we get there, they’ll probably still be having lunch. [aspectual meaning] ii Will you be going to the shops this ...
-3
votes
1answer
25 views

Danish vs. Dutch

Is there a difference between the languages Danish and Dutch? Or are they the same things altogether?
0
votes
1answer
15 views

The particular word or phrase for description

Detailed descriptions are used in poetry and prose[fiction or even non-fiction] to paint a vivid, detailed picture in the minds of the readers. Authors achieve this feat using vivid imagery about a ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

What is the correct Verb form?

A group of women seek an appointment. or A group of women seeks an appointment. Which is correct?
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Idiom for 'Resisting just to resist'

Recently, I've been listening to the song 'Time and Time Again" by Chronic Future (link for those who wish to listen https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=45TEYZp213E) Around line 6 of verse 3, the lyric is ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Question regarding quotes and question marks

Which is Proper: "do you have instructions for us right now"? or "do you have instructions for us right now?"
-1
votes
2answers
22 views

how to use exactly meaning “to”? [on hold]

i am learning English. and i have a problem which how to use exactly meaning "to" in English ?
0
votes
0answers
15 views

“It varies” or “it is varied”?

For example, would it be better to use it varies in time, or it is varied in time?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Is it supposed to be “responses” here?

The original sentence in The Cornhill Magazine: For the same reason, writers talk interminably about their own books, winkling out hidden meanings, super-imposing new ones, begging response ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

A comma question

The sentence is: I'm curled up on my bed, sick with worry, because she knows the truth. Is the comma usage correct here, or does this sentence need a comma? Thanks in advance.
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Tenses: Present perfect with bare infinitive

I am researching verb tense on this site and others, and I have gotten confused about the tenses and parts of speech in this sentence: "The author provides proven research that has helped many people ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Questions on “In the breaking and remaking, in the timing, interweaving, beginning afresh”

Below is an extract from a textbook. I have several questions on the boldfaced part. Please help. I have known very few writers, but those I have known, and whom I respect, confess at once that ...
1
vote
0answers
42 views

Is “different from” or “different than” more correct?

"I am different from/than you." (I am not similar to you.) Is one usage more correct than the other? Or are they two different usages that could mean two different things? The answers to the other ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

What does “do a number” mean?

In the song One is the loneliest number there is: One is the loneliest number that you'll ever do I don't understand what "do a number" means!
1
vote
1answer
18 views

What does `attested to` mean in a legal document?

What does attested to mean in a legal context? "...are reviewed on a quarterly basis and attested to by <authority-figure>"
0
votes
0answers
18 views

What does Designate mean in a legal document?

When I read this in a legal document I believe it means "whom ever the authority figure designates" but I'm a little unsure of that. It keeps coming up in the thing that I'm reading, and that's why I'...
-1
votes
1answer
23 views

i kind of get on with all my neighbours [on hold]

what does the following sentence mean? "I kind of get on with all my neighbours"
6
votes
6answers
322 views

What to call a small, open stone or cement reservoir that supplies fresh water from a spring or other natural source?

In Spanish, this is called a pila or pilón. It's built out of stone or cement near a natural source of water (a spring or a stream) to hold the naturally-arriving water to make it convenient for ...
-2
votes
1answer
28 views

Looking for other ways to say [on hold]

I am looking for a sentence for "I checked the coffee hotness level" in a past manner have any slag for that? and other ways to say this sentence
0
votes
1answer
33 views

Can you help me to find out the wrong words? [on hold]

The factory (was closed down) (considering) the use of excessive (chemical) made the river (dries out) 2.The Maasai tribe (are) people (whom) have (wondered) throughout the world for (nearly) 1000 ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Two question words in a declarative sentence?

It was examined that which type of measurements created what sets of results.** Is is OK to use which and what in this sentence?
-2
votes
2answers
37 views

What is the difference between definition and explanation?

What is the difference between definition and explanation? According to definition of both: Explanation: A statement or account that makes something clear. Definition: A statement of the exact ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

Choice between past tense and present tense?

Todd is asking Dan about his concept of slow travel. The below is part of Dan's reply. Yeah, I mean especially maybe because I'm a blogger, we're always seeking to define things in unique ways. ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

what does “by” mean here

America’s defence secretary ended his short Asian tour today in Tokyo, by trying to calm a nervous ally. Is it like "go to school by bus", using this method? But it is more like after finishing the ...
-2
votes
0answers
13 views

Which context has the verb “constitute” been used in here?

I read this sentence in a book named "Word Power Made Easy": It is only the few who are so constituted that lack of learning becomes a nuisance. I am not able to figure out which context the verb ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Can I use the word 'also' like this?

I wrote an essay in which I focused on the differences between travelling by train and travelling by car. I was told I can't use the word 'also' like I did in the following sentence: "A car is ...
2
votes
1answer
17 views

Punctuation in lists that end mid-sentence

I know that we can introduce a list with a semicolon or an em dash, but nowhere can I find any rules on punctuation when a list ends mid-sentence. Say I have a sentence that goes like this: Lawn ...
-1
votes
1answer
32 views

The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.” [on hold]

what does the quote of shakespeare mean ? can someone explain it to me in common english
1
vote
1answer
32 views

“As humans gifted with intelligence,” or “As humans are gifted with intelligence,”?

I recently wrote an essay during my exam about the environment and our responsibility. In one of my paragraphs, I wrote: "As humans gifted with intelligence, it is our duty to protect the flora and ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Shouldn't there be “you” instead of “your” in this sentence?

I read this sentence in a book named "Word Power Made Easy": Such procedures would have struck you as absurd then, as absurd as they would be for your today. I think "you" should precede "today" ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Appointment scheduling nomenclature

My question is quite broad, thus I wasn't able to close it under a single title, so forgive me. Background: I can work between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays, between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Name for a software used to design crisis scenarios [on hold]

I am currently developing a software used to design crisis scenarios for simulation. My biggest problem at the moment is that the project lacks a name. So has anyone a good idea for a name of such a ...
-1
votes
1answer
61 views

An adjective to replace “so random” (to describe one who is apt to say random things)

Among friends, we describe a person as "so random" (he/she is so random) if that person says random things (often in group discussions). That is, we do not use it as defined below (to mean he/she is ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Is it correct to say bottlenecks are emerging on the surface of the project?

I need to say that some problems are appearing on the project, for that I wanted to say bottlenecks are emerging. Is this term correct? If not, how can I say a similar formal sentence?
0
votes
0answers
56 views

Does the present progressive representing the future have a starting and end point?

The present progressive has a starting point and an end point in time. In (1), for example, the act of me working on the project has a starting point before 'now' and an end point after 'now': (1) ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Special words and idioms

Are there any words or word combinations in English to use for men to abuse, like " you never keep your promise, are you a real man!" "Are you a real man!" Is it correct to say like that?
4
votes
3answers
385 views

Farthing / Riding

A 'farthing' is an an administrative quadrant (4 parts) Is a 'riding' an administrative triant (3 parts)? How do we call each of the parts of a circle divided in 3 parts? Not 'one third' but another ...
2
votes
3answers
90 views

What does 'turn of the century' mean?

If I wanted to write about 1899, would I call it the turn of the 19th century or the turn of the 20th century? Basically: does 'turn of the century' refer to the beginning or end of a century?
-1
votes
1answer
37 views

Should there be a 'do' here? - “Trying to figure out what (do) I enjoy doing.”

Should there be a 'do' in this sentence? "Trying to figure out what (do) I enjoy doing." Thank you in advance!
1
vote
2answers
49 views

A single word for describing someone who's both great at writing and speaking [on hold]

Writing and speaking are relevant to each other; they both employ words in expressing ideas. Wondering if there's an adjective for describing someone who's impressive in writing and speaking. The ...
-2
votes
1answer
47 views

Right a wrong & wrong a right [on hold]

You can say "right a wrong" & "righting wrongs" But can you say "wrong a right or "wronging rights"

15 30 50 per page