All Questions

4
votes
1answer
531 views

“Would have us view” — is it correct?

It probably is correct since the article is from Bloomberg.com website. However, I am not sure what it really means and why it's correct Mark Twain once quipped that “everyone complains about the ...
14
votes
3answers
37k views

“currently not” or “not currently”

What's the correct order: Lessons are not currently being offered. or Lessons are currently not being offered.
60
votes
9answers
5k views

Is it ever worth the time and effort to correct someone else's grating grammatical mistakes? [closed]

Whenever I hear statements like "It was a great deal for he and I" and "Call Karen and I in the morning," I die a little. Such solecisms, as Twain said in another context (Cooper's prose style), "...
26
votes
4answers
6k views

Transform or transformation?

Is there a difference between the words transform (noun) and transformation? Let me describe my problem. I have a mathematical model which I can transform into a better model with help of a data ...
20
votes
5answers
62k views

What are the rules for pronunciation of years in English?

We pronounce 1923 as nineteen twenty-three; but 1900 as nineteen hundred. Why isn't year 2000 pronounced as twenty hundred instead of two thousand? What are the rules for pronunciation of years in ...
2
votes
4answers
10k views

Is 'disabilitated' a real word?

I think not, but look at this Wikipedia link about parental leave in different countries, scroll down to the large table and look under Romania. I don't think this is a real word, I tried doing an ...
3
votes
2answers
19k views

How do you write the short form of “you all”?

The short form is pronounced as "yoll", but what is the actual spelling? Is it "y'all"? Any official mention of the spelling? Example useage: "Where are you-all going". Pronounced as "Where are yoll ...
6
votes
3answers
29k views

Place of “often” in the sentence

My question is simple. Is the following sentence correct? They don't watch TV often. My English teacher has told me that the only correct option is: They don't often watch TV. Is she right?
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Where are phrases such as “my one friend” used?

I occasionally hear someone use the phrase "my one friend" to mean "one of my friends". To me it sounds like they only have one. Where is this form used most?
7
votes
4answers
18k views

“your and Mr X's publication” vs. “you and Mr X's publication”

I came across your and Mr X's publication or I came across you and Mr X's publication
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Why are some words combined into a single word while others stay as two words?

Examples: Anyone Anything Anytime Anywhere Everyone Everything Every time Everywhere No one Nothing No time Nowhere Someone Something Sometime Somewhere Why is there a discrepancy? Is there any ...
25
votes
6answers
3k views

Word meaning coincidence of reference to the unusual

Most of us have had the experience of stumbling over a new fact or bit of knowledge and then finding several more references to it in the near future. For example, you see a strange word which you're ...
10
votes
3answers
51k views

What's the difference between “cabinet” and “cupboard”?

What's the difference between "cabinet" and "cupboard"?
63
votes
18answers
7k views

Central Pennsylvanian English speakers: what are the limitations on the “needs washed” construction?

In the Central Pennsylvania dialect of English (and possibly elsewhere), the following construction is possible: This car needs washed. (=needs to be washed) The room needs cleaned. (=needs to ...
4
votes
1answer
645 views

How can I join many adjectives to one word and create a grammatical phrase?

I have to describe an object that is: a pair of round/rounded earrings, made of wood/wooden, with bosses of brass/brass bossed? How can I put it in a single statement? I think that it could be ...
6
votes
7answers
31k views

What's the difference between Media and Press

What's the difference between Media and Press, I think that press for newspapers and media for TV, can anyone give us details about that?
6
votes
4answers
21k views

Origin of 'hit the sack'?

I know it means to go to sleep but where did it originate from. I'm looking for first use. Just curious.
48
votes
3answers
171k views

How should I abbreviate “versus”?

There are 4 types of abbreviations I know for "versus": v v. vs vs. I generally use the last one in the list, but I want to stick to one and use only that one. Which one is more proper (or more ...
64
votes
7answers
30k views

Which is the correct spelling: “grey” or “gray”?

What is the difference? Or is there any? Which would be more British English?
6
votes
1answer
58k views

What are the differences between “allegories”, “fables” and “parables”?

My concept of the three is: Allegory: A story in which ideas are symbolized as people. Parable: A short story designed to teach a moral or religious lesson. Fable: A short story in which animals or ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

The verb form of “Is entered in the race”

[I'm not much of an expert in English usage, just an armchair boffin, so I hope I'm not out of line asking what may be a dumb question, to the regulars here...] I am trying to figure out the form of ...
43
votes
2answers
88k views

A number of questions “has been” or “have been” asked?

Formally, is it correct to write: A number of questions has been asked here. or: A number of questions have been asked here. As a non-native speaker of English, I would prefer the former: the ...
12
votes
2answers
29k views

Why “ladybird”?

In case you don't know, in British English, the little red-with-black-spots insect is not called a "ladybug", as in North America, but a "ladybird". This seems rather a poor act of classification, ...
18
votes
4answers
20k views

Why does one count mississippily?

I was watching an episode of Friends where Ross talks about "counting mississippily". I did not get the joke. Why would someone say "Mississippi" after every number? Is there some story behind it?
77
votes
7answers
40k views

Which is correct: “Filename”, “File Name” or “FileName”?

Which is correct: "Filename", "File Name" or "FileName"?
6
votes
1answer
3k views

What is the meaning of the word “rain-maker”? How did this originate?

What is the meaning of the word "rain-maker"? How did this originate?
1
vote
1answer
3k views

How is “admire” used in “to admire them a great deal”?

I knew that admire can be used in phrases like "admire somebody" or "admire somebody for something", but recently I have found the following sentence in my Collins dictionary: If you emulate ...
0
votes
0answers
241 views

“You and I” versus “you and me” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which is correct, “you and I” or “you and me”? When I was in primary school, I was advised by my English teacher to use "you and I" instead of "you and ...
4
votes
2answers
14k views

How to remember using “have” instead of “of”? [closed]

I'm (reasonably) sure these are wrong: I would of won. I could of done that. and are likely so common because if you phonetically transcribe "would've", "could've", etc, that's what you get. ...
14
votes
2answers
9k views

What is the difference between a phrase and a clause?

What is the difference between a phrase and a clause? I tried looking this in dictionary but can not identify the difference. It would be great if I could get an example and formula of what makes a ...
16
votes
5answers
26k views

“Miniscule” vs. “minuscule”

Does the former have a typo or are they synonyms? Do they always have the same meaning? Please enlighten me as I am confused on this matter.
7
votes
2answers
5k views

What's the difference between “hence” and “thus”?

Can anyone explain the difference between hence and thus and when should we use one and not the other?
10
votes
1answer
22k views

Why do we call cinema The Seventh Art?

Why do we call cinema The Seventh Art? Why not sixth or fifth?
8
votes
2answers
6k views

The saying “Hair of the Dog”

I drank a little to much last night, and one of my friends suggested "the hair of the dog" to cure my hangover. Where did this saying come from?
5
votes
2answers
808 views

When talking about something, where do we place its name in the sentence?

In Computer Science papers (and I'm sure that in papers in many other fields, too), we often have to describe a new tool or method that has a name. Let's talk for instance about Eclipse, and its wide ...
6
votes
1answer
5k views

The Meaning of “Crew Expendable”? [closed]

In a game (Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare), when a soldier (Gaz) asks his commander (Captain Price) about the "rules of engagement," he is answered "crew expendable." As they are fighting on a ship, ...
8
votes
5answers
12k views

“In orbit” vs. “on orbit”

When should one use something like "conducting experiments in orbit" vs. "conducting experiments on orbit"?
14
votes
4answers
57k views

“Favorite” vs. “favourite”

Excuse my stupid question, but do "favorite" and "favourite" mean the same thing?
-3
votes
1answer
7k views

What is the meaning of “This will be shown to all users but John”? [closed]

What does the following sentence mean? This menu will be shown to all users but John. Does it mean that the menu will be shown to all users except John or only to John?
12
votes
4answers
523 views

How to read aloud a sentence like 'In the year 18.. they decided to move to Bricktown'

How to read aloud a sentence like 'In the year 18.. they decided to move to Bricktown'? Such sentences are common especially in Victorian literature. My only option is 'eighteen and something' but I ...
4
votes
2answers
6k views

Why are words such as “that” and “those” not considered articles?

According to Wikipedia (disclaimer: of course I realize that Wikipedia should not be regarded as an absolute authority, but I generally consider it to be a fairly accurate and reliable resource): ...
5
votes
3answers
9k views

Is “choose from one of four options” wrong?

I need backup in pressing my case that the phrase “choose from one of four options” is grammatically incorrect. Is there some resource that can prove my case, that the incorrect phrase should be ...
5
votes
7answers
38k views

Origin and meaning of “The eagle flies at midnight”

The eagle flies at midnight. What's the origin and meaning of this idiom?
141
votes
5answers
261k views

“log in to” or “log into” or “login to”

When writing an instruction about connecting to a computer using ssh, telnet, etc., I'm not sure what spacing to use in this familiar spoken phrase: "Log in to host.com" "Log into host.com" "Login to ...
2
votes
3answers
30k views

“Which we discussed” vs. “about which we discussed”

Which one is correct? I’ve added changes/fixes which we discussed yesterday. or I’ve added changes/fixes about which we discussed yesterday.
9
votes
4answers
7k views

Origin of “Turns the Table” idiom

I know the meaning of the phrase, but where exactly does it come from?
2
votes
5answers
4k views

Cross Origins of Comrade and Camaraderie

If "Comrade" and "camaraderie" are from Spanish and French, why did the Russians and particularly Soviets (and later the Chinese and South Africans), come to adopt Comrade for usage? Also, does ...
1
vote
3answers
828 views

Das Keyboard Refurbished Professional Model S: What does “Refurbished” mean?

Everything is in the question, so I copy/paste: Das Keyboard Refurbished Professional Model S: what does "Refurbished" mean?
5
votes
7answers
29k views

What is the opposite of “interesting” in “This person is interesting”?

During a conversation yesterday, I couldn't come up with the opposite of interesting. "Initially she was very interesting, and I enjoyed her company. However, a few months later, she became [...
3
votes
3answers
741 views

Shorter way to say “split [user story] into tasks”

In scrum (a project management methodology often used for software development), there are user stories (or items) which team members split into smaller tasks when they start working on them. To ...

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