All Questions

1
vote
1answer
12 views
0
votes
1answer
30 views

How do you derive an adverb from “difficult”?

Consider this sentence: The solution to this question should no more difficult be obtained than that to the other question. Is this sentence grammatical? Is difficult here used as an adverb?
0
votes
0answers
9 views

What is the meaning of “we must have missed you”? [migrated]

I was missed from agenda list of minutes of meeting, hence i requested for including my name in the list. But the chairperson of the meeting replied saying "we must have missed you". I am confused? ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

“The number of steps is infinite” or “The number of steps is infinity”?

In a mathematical paper about random-walks. Which is more correct: "The number of steps in the random-walk is infinite" or "The number of steps in the random-walk is infinity"?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

I using the word “very” always allowed or it is better to limit the usage?

I noticed that I'm using the word very quite often. I'd say I use it very often. For example: I find search engines very helpful. I'm very happy for you. Your are very good at that. He's very sad ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

You “Not” or You “Do Not” [on hold]

I heard a song that use that phrase: "you only live once? No, you not live only once" Is this right? Wasnt "you dont live only once" the better option?
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Would you help me regarding English grammar? [on hold]

We examine these effects in Korea because first, there is appropriate panel data to analyze the subject; second, it has a good population distribution to compare the happiness level between the ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

Can a PP be analysed as a complex adjective?

In the sentence They are more familiar with this, the predicative complement more familiar with this is an AdjP, with the adjective head familiar. But what about a sentence such as They are more at ...
0
votes
0answers
9 views

Should I use apposition while writing a formal letter? [on hold]

Consider the following Dear Members of the Admissions Committee, I am writing to request a waiver for the English proficiency test. ... and Dear Members of the Admissions Committee, ...
1
vote
1answer
16 views

how to attribute a singular property to a plural noun?

Please consider the following examples: The size/sizes of the planets is/are written here. The door/doors of a 100 houses is/are 100Kg. Men's nose/noses is/are bigger than that/those of women. Which ...
0
votes
2answers
24 views

This guy's alright in my book, because he used the word “rapscallion”. Meaning

This guy's alright in my book, because he used the word "rapscallion". Source What it means by alright in my book?
11
votes
3answers
2k views

Use of 'female' and 'male' (in science fiction)

Often in science fiction when someone refers to a male or female member of some other species, they use terms like "the klingon female". This also happens between members of that species, so if a ...
3
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there an opposite phrase for “The apple never falls far from the tree”?

I was doing some research on idioms, and came upon the thought of whether there is an opposite idiom for The apple never falls far from the tree. as in "The offspring have much in common with ...
1
vote
0answers
17 views

Paraphrasing a sentence including so many “I”s

Consider the following sentence, [...]but it feels like, if I were to do otherwise, I would be lost, so I did what I could. Using "I" all the time doesn't sound very "native" way of doing this, ...
4
votes
3answers
43 views

Is there a word to describe the process of finding your own materials and tools to produce a work?

Is there an English word that describes the process or time spent finding your own materials and/or tools to produce a work? For example, what would you call all of the following similar processes? ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Revising a sentence to make it more clear

I'm making revisions on a book from an archaeological museum. As I was reading through, this sentence stroke me as a bit odd and I need your help correcting it. Pottery shaped as horses, ducks, ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Sorry for not been/being able to participate?

Is Sorry for not been able to participate in the meeting despite being very vocal about his subject on the group (the meeting already happened) or Sorry for not being able to participate [...]...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Can I use “into” instead of “to”?

He was quick to adapt himself to the new system. = He was quick to adapt himself (into) the new system. Can I use "into" instead of "to"?
0
votes
2answers
45 views

Cristóvão Colombo's name in America [on hold]

How do American people usually pronounce Cristóvão Colombo's name? For example, do Americans say "Cristopher"? Is that a correct version of this? Or do they pronounce it like in my country (Brazil, ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Difference between “he got no” and “he didn't get”

What is the difference between He got no fish from there. and He didn't get fish from there.
0
votes
0answers
15 views

Did she leave a package for me? Did she leave me a package? [on hold]

Are both of these sentences correct? Is there any difference? Did she leave a package for me? Did she leave me a package?
0
votes
2answers
29 views

What would be a word between 'opposite' and 'next to?'

If you had two people sitting at ninety degrees to each other (see the attached image), they wouldn't be opposite each other, but they wouldn't be next to each other either. Is there an English word ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

He was given certificate [on hold]

"He (boss) was given certificate"in this sentence whom do give certificate ,to boss or boss given to someone else.please give me suggestions
0
votes
0answers
15 views

The difference between 'to' and 'of' in some sentences

I have a quick question regarding some usages of both 'to' and 'of'. Could you please have a look at the sentences below and share your insights with me as to how to make a distinction between them. ...
2
votes
1answer
19 views

What does the phrase “held in confidence” mean?

I recently came across this sentence: Thank them for their time and remind them that answers will be held in confidence. Simplifying things, if I said "Your answers will be held in confidence", ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

Is the phrase “That is typically exactly what happens “ grammatically correct?

Wondering if it makes sense to say “That is typically exactly what happens “. My wife tells me I can’t use the words typically and exactly together.
3
votes
1answer
27 views

Some types of nouns feel ungrammatical in “His every [noun]”?

Abstract nouns, specifically nouns related to feelings, feel natural: Set A: His every {whim, desire, need, wish} should be satisfied by the council. However, concrete nouns feel wrong. Set B:...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

What does “a cross between the Parthenon and the Reichstag” mean?

In Gerard Durrell's The Whispering Land I ran into the sentence below: At that precise moment we were heading towards the massive building that looked like a cross between the Parthenon and the ...
1
vote
3answers
45 views

Two close prepositions; how do you not end with one?

I've always had difficulty ascertaining the way to approach structuring a particular type of sentence re: the situation in the question title. There are probably all sorts of ways to restructure ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

“25th De­cem­ber” vs “25 De­cem­ber”: Should I use or­di­nals or car­di­nals for the day of the month?

In one of the IELTS lis­ten­ing tests, there is a fill-out-the-blank ques­tion read­ing: The mu­seum is not open on ___. My an­swer was “25th De­cem­ber”. How­ever, the of­fi­cial an­swer is “25 ...
3
votes
1answer
52 views

Do Americans pronounce “transient” as \ˈtran(t)-sh(ē-)ənt\?

Merriam-Webster pronounces "transient" as \ˈtran(t)-sh(ē-)ənt\. However, most Americans pronounce it as \ˈtran-zē-ənt\.
0
votes
0answers
6 views

Which is correct; “Be not late for school”, or “Don't be late for school” [migrated]

We are taught when you negate a verb, you use "do not", "does not" or "did not" for general verbs, but you only have to add "not" after the verb in the case of Be-verb. If this rule should be applied ...
4
votes
0answers
37 views

How do archaic words affect on English native speakers?

I wonder why I need to know words like thereby, thereunto, wherewithal, hereonafter, thenceforward and others. I understand that I am unable to use them while writing an essay, because these words are ...
-2
votes
0answers
28 views

Is sentence of using God's name correct or is there a better phrasing?

I just snapped this up from a youtube comment. It was regarding Respawn Entertainments and their Titanfall series. I’m a born again Christian and the Campaign used God’s name as a cuss word a lot, ...
-2
votes
0answers
22 views

I am aware the punctuation is incomplete. Just looking to see if you understand my poem. Thank you [on hold]

Doubt I want to do better I want to be better for me, for you, for everyone that I love They tell me, I am a good person, and that I have so many amazing qualities I hope they do not mind if I take ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Tattoo phrase translated properly!

I’m Spanish and I wanna get tattooed a phrase that I always say but in English instead. It’s something like ‘You can’t judge someone for something he hasn’t chosen’ I know it is not right like that, ...
2
votes
4answers
43 views

Word/phrase meaning fatal blow (in an argument)

I'm searching for a word, phrase or term that means the fatal blow, something along the lines of coup de grace. However, that term has implies a merciful killing. I'm looking for something that ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

‘One less’ or ‘one fewer’?

If we’ve lost a team member, do we have ‘one member less’, ‘one less member’, ‘one member fewer’, or ‘one fewer member’? Thanks!
1
vote
2answers
52 views

Opposite of “the league of extraordinary gentlemen”?

If "the league of extraordinary gentlemen" consists of good guys what do we call the analogue group consisting of bad (but not necessarily uncultivated) guys? I am thinking of members like Prof. ...
0
votes
0answers
47 views

Which of the underlined words in the passage needs to be replaced? [on hold]

Answer Choices: a. practically b. literally c.importantly d. important e. newly The correct answer is "importantly". Can someone please explain why?
3
votes
0answers
44 views

Does “government” mean something different in British English? [migrated]

There's been lots of news in the past couple of days about votes in the UK Parliament regarding Brexit. These reports seem to use the word "government" in a way that I don't understand. For instance, ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

How to rephrase 'questions that concern me'

I'm wondering how is the following statement could be improved and used in formal English: I've added some questions that concern me. I've added some questions I'm worried about. I've ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Is it correct to use “because of”'?

I read the motivational phrase " You are a precious and important person, only BECAUSE OF BEING YOURSELF" I want to know if it is written correctly or if it were better to say "You are a precious and ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

What do you call the amount of money that is added to your bill if you don't pay on time?

In Russia we have this system where if you don't pay your bills on time, the service providers will keep adding on 1/130th (or something like that) of your debt everyday, as a form of punishment. In ...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

What does it mean to say “as the clarks swivel around to me”?

When Bercow says in formal antiquated Brtishlish, I say on advice as the clarks swivel around to me What does that mean? I have never seen a swiveling "clark"?
0
votes
1answer
14 views

more than I could hope to

I'd like to know the meaning of "could hope to" in a sample sentence from my grammar book: He earns more in a month than I could hope to in a year. I think it's hypothetical situation. But I don't ...
6
votes
2answers
40 views

A word or phrase for valuing the metric over what's being measured

As an example, let's say a company does an employee satisfaction survey and the scores come back low. Instead of addressing the complaints, they send out a memo saying that they'll start basing ...
0
votes
1answer
36 views

“Nothing is compared with” or “Nothing is compared to”

Do we say "Nothing is compared with the Egyptian pyramids" or "Nothing is compared to the Egyptian pyramids"? If both are correct,is either one favourable in general or in British or American ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

“will” for future plans (+ specific time involved - day, date, hour)

Can I use "will" instead of "going to or present continuous" when asking or making statements about someone's plans with a specific time involved? for example: I will meet her Monday morning at 7 ...
0
votes
3answers
20 views

“That's all your guesses used up” is correct?

I saw this in a TV programme: "And that's all your guesses used up" I get the meaning but I'm not sure if it is "that's" instead of "those're". Maybe it stands for "that has", but I am not sure ...

15 30 50 per page