All Questions

0
votes
2answers
39 views

“Sit at the beach”

I have a question about the use of "at the beach". I know there were similar topics, however in none of them I can find whether it is possible to say "sit at the beach". More specifically I want to ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

preposition follow the word “interpreter”?

Example Statement: He acted as interpreter between the Spanish locals and the tourists. Should the preposition following "interpreter" be "between" or "for" or something else? or should the entire ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

A word means “move one's hand across hair till it is flat and even”

I basically just forgot the word, I've got really vague recollection of it, I think it's SMOOTH, like I smooth my hair back But I only remember one of the example sentences in my app, I don't really ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

causative passive vs simple past

I have some confusion about the doer in these sentences: (1) I should fix my PC. (2) I fixed my PC. (2) I should have my PC fixed. (3) I should have my homework done by tomorrow. so who is the ...
-1
votes
0answers
18 views

what's a word for between two languages? interlingual, interlinguistic, interlanguage? is there an even better term?

what's a word for between two languages? Interlingual, interlinguistic, interlanguage? is there an even better term?
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Unfrosted light bulb

In Catch-22 there is following passage (my emphasis): The unfrosted light bulb overhead was swinging crazily on its loose wire, and the jumbled black shadows kept swirling and bobbing chaotically, ...
1
vote
0answers
23 views

“one” as a pronoun for uncountable nouns

Is it grammatically right to use one as a pronoun to substitute for the word water? I prefer plain water to sparkling one.
0
votes
1answer
25 views

How to paraphrase this sentence [on hold]

As a result, Wilbur set out for Europe in 1908, where he hoped he would have more success convincing the public and selling airplanes.
1
vote
1answer
29 views

What does “IP” mean in military aviation?

In Catch-22 I found the mention of the abbreviation "IP": One of the surprising things always was the sense of calm and utter silence, broken only by the test rounds fired from the machine guns, by ...
-1
votes
1answer
20 views

Understanding of below sentence

I’m writing an email but I wonder whether the below sentence is clear to understand. If it isn’t understandable show me up the correction. That the orders have been delayed we have decided to ...
17
votes
1answer
2k views

What does “Four-F.” mean?

What did "Four-F." mean in the United States of the 1940s? Here is the quote from Catch-22: They had to send a guy from the draft board around to look me over. I was Four-F. I had examined myself ...
1
vote
4answers
51 views

Difference between dependent and independent clauses

In the sentence "It's raining, but I'm happy," "but" is a coordinating conjunction. Both of the clauses are independent, right? However, doesn't "I'm happy even though it's raining" mean the same ...
2
votes
1answer
18 views

Alternate sentence for I reached home

I saw a creepy man coming towards me I start running straight to my home. After "i reached home" I locked all the doors and windows. In this para what alternative word can I use instead of "I reached ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

When splitting a long sentence, is using a colon as good as making it two sentences?

English is not my first language, although I use it daily. When writing in English, I tend to write long, complicated sentences. I then edit the text with the Hemingway app to highlight such lengthy/...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Can you say “what was —- a reaction to?”

If I mean to ask the main causes of something, so I want to know what something reacted to, can I say “what was the war a reaction to?”? It sounds pretty weird to me... I’d rather say “what did the ...
-2
votes
1answer
11 views

How to use either or neither in the sentence? [on hold]

Please assist me here, May you elaborate on how to neither nor and either or in the sentence,
14
votes
5answers
2k views

Worshiping one God at a time?

I am writing an article on "God, Types of Worship" and I'm looking for a term which describes worshiping a single god at a time. That is, given that different gods exist, the practise of worshiping ...
0
votes
2answers
42 views

What does this comment mean?

This YouTube comment has tons of likes. What does it mean? From Aladdin - Official Trailer Aladdin: Genie... I wish for you to make me a prince Genie: would you like to be a fresh one?...(...
-1
votes
2answers
13 views

Hasn't vs haven't [on hold]

Which one is correct to use she hasn't received the letter. she haven't received the letter.
-2
votes
0answers
21 views

Where does the humor of “satisfaction on the field of honor” come from?

I am reading A Gentleman in Moscow and on the first page of the book, count Rostov is being questioned by prosecutor Vyshinsky: Vyshinsky: Before we begin, I must say, I do not think I have ever ...
4
votes
2answers
263 views

Usage and meaning of “up” in “…worth at least a thousand pounds up in London”

Two chairs like that must be worth at least a thousand pounds up in London. I don't know what the 'up' mean in the sentence. I'm even not sure which words — perhaps either 'a thousand pounds' or 'in ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Have been to/have gone to

Could you please see if I have the correct solution for this task: "Write the sentence, using 'have (has) been'/'have (has) gone'. Don't forget about full stops. Example 0. I haven't seen Kate for ...
9
votes
7answers
1k views

Is there a term for accumulated dirt on the outside of your hands and feet?

As I sat in the steam room after half-killing myself at the gym earlier today, contemplating the meaning of life, I noticed that a certain amount of dirt had accumulated on the lateral sides of my – ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Are iambic and trochaic rhythms natural to English speech and writing? If so, why?

We're all familiar with the iambic and trochaic metres in verse, but how about prose? I wonder if we can improve our everyday writing by using those 'natural' rhythms in a more conscious and ...
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Subject + sound + Adjective

I called after him, worried that I might have sounded ungrateful. Unlike 'It sounds [Adjective].', if a person subject comes instead of 'it', what does the verb 'sound' mean? I'm not sure for the ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Verbal agreement of “more of + plural noun”

Here Are More Of The Most Amazing Images Of Cars Is the sentence grammatical? Shouldn't it concoord is with the uncountable more (of), instead of its current plural are? According to Microsoft® ...
-1
votes
0answers
36 views

What is the idiom, expression or phrase for when you as a student are asked to check your own answers or grade yourself?

This idiom, expression or phrase would usually be used in a sarcastic manner. Consider the following exchange: Lazy art teacher: Students, have you completed the painting test? Students: Yes, ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Is there a name for the category containing the words trans and cis?

Gender is the name of the category that contains the words male, female, and others. The words trans and cis are not genders, rather they describe the state of one's gender: i.e. trans refers to one ...
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Grammatical Error: He is such a man who is liked by everyone [on hold]

Is it grammatically correct? He is such a man who is liked by everyone.
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Tell + to-infinitive vs Say + to-infinitive

The road sign is said to be from as early as the 19th century. Few would doubt this sentence is perfectly correct and idiomatic English and it's pretty much the same as saying "people say the road ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Why aren't degree modifiers complements?

As far as I've been able to figure out, in the CaGEL* framework, complements are items that are licensed by some other element (generally the head), so that if an item has to be licensed, it is per ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Function of PPs with predicative complements

According to CaGEL* (e.g. p.636 ff), prepositions can take predicative complements, as in [1] She worked as a waitress [2] He passed for dead [3] I took you for granted [4] They left him for ...
0
votes
2answers
55 views

“The Go Programming Language” - is the article necessary?

https://golang.org/ Not a native speaker. To me it sounds weird. I'd say "Go programming language". Thanks
0
votes
3answers
50 views

Where does “vice-a-versa” come from?

I believe the correct term is "vice versa", but occasionally I hear "vice-a-versa" being said. Is there any explanation for that pronunciation?
1
vote
3answers
41 views

A place that is away from your normal life?

How do you describe, using a noun, a place you can escape from your old life but only temporarily. It kinda feels like a summer house, but bears no relevance to the seasons. I have thought about the ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

“Since he did” vs “since he had done”

everyone! Could you please help me to choose between these two variants? "He said he had been working in this laboratory (lab) since he graduated." "He said he had been working in this laboratory (...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

What do you call my wife's mother's small brother?

What should I call my wife's mother's small brother? My wife calls him uncle ("mamaji" in Hindi). What should I call him?
0
votes
2answers
38 views

What does “add years to my life” mean?

I thought it means to live longer, but look at the following: Dear Katharine (very dear): I've had moments of despair during the last week which have added years to my life and put many new ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

English: “As per my preliminary research, the facility uses…” [on hold]

Is there another way to begin that sentence? I would like to use this beginning to start my sentence to inform the reader I had already done preliminary research on this medical facility.
1
vote
1answer
22 views

What's this “Jl. Sg.” appended to a name in the Social Register?

Screenshotted from the (fictitious) "1929 Social Register" in the opening sequence of the film Down to Their Last Yacht (1934). "Miss Linda Colt-Stratton" I get, but what's the "Jl. Sg." after her ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Term for the brain's automatic [psychological] response to being told to do something; to not want to do that thing anymore

I was wondering if there are any terms that describe a psychological response to this specific type of interaction- something along the lines of: You know what academic work you have to do for a ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

how do you pronounce a rolling “o” as in “so” or “no”?

I noticed that in New Zealand most people pronounce "o" at the end of "no" or "so" in a rather rolled manner - something closer to [our] instead of simple [ou]. For example, lady in this video does ...
-1
votes
0answers
19 views

Does technology mean the technique, the terminology, or both?

Does technology mean technique, terminology, or both? I am asking because it would seem that language itself is a technology, a tool, for distinguishing reality, but would in common usage would think ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

Please translate to American English from the British the following: OH **UK!

The cover of the most recent Economist (March 16 - 22nd 2019) has in large type OH **UK! Whatever next? From the context, this is clearly a comment on the current Brexit mess. Is ** UK related ...
1
vote
3answers
46 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct or not?

Is this correct? Such cooperation can prepare students to be good team players and understand the value of other people’s perspectives. Or should it be "...players and to understand..." Or would ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Meaning of “…went as bad as you can go”

In the movie Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Hagrid says: "A few years ago there was one wizard who went as bad as you can go." What does "went bad as bad as you can go" mean? Why does he say ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

IPA (International phonetic alphabet) can take a plural form? [on hold]

I know that code is a countable noun, and I tend to refer to IPA like a code.
0
votes
1answer
32 views

When did “whole entire” enter into English language usage?

As a replacement for whole, entire, complete etc. Why the redundance? I first heard it in the 1970's.
0
votes
0answers
33 views

I made up the word, “performant”. Has it occurred in the English language? [duplicate]

By performant, I mean something that performs well. A piece of computer program code could be performant, meaning that enough thought went into it to make it perform well, making it an adjective; ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Questions about “get” and “be”

Is it good English to write the following passive sentences, considering that it should describe what a system is doing in general (but maybe not necessarily at the moment)? I am interested in the ...

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