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How Was “Feast” Pronounced in Early Modern English?

In Romeo and Juliet, Capulet delivers a speech to Paris about his consent for him to court Juliet. With the exception of the first three lines, his speech would follow a coupled rhyme scheme... 16 ...
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0answers
8 views

A mathematics career but a journalist-ic career?

My question pertains to the rules, and more specifically the ostensible violation of the rules on the modification of nouns into adjectives. I sometimes experience difficulty of knowing when to ...
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14 views

What is the original intentional use of the phrase 'systems thinking'?

I have found references in 1963 which seem to be the 'first published that google knows about', but it seems from this that the phrase was in fairly common use by then:see here and here. (see my ...
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2answers
26 views

Meaning of “against”

I have a question about the meaning of "against" in the following sentence: "These communications should be in writing and delivered against receipt." I don't understand why "...
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1answer
31 views

I cannot understand the meaning of the following sentence fron Dickens' Notes of America

The last sentence from the following paragraph from Dickens is ambiguious for me; "He was only twenty-five years old, he said, and had grown recently, for it had been found necessary to make an ...
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0answers
18 views

Which is grammatically correct? “My test is the next day” or “My test is on next day”?

I want to know that whether both the sentence are same or one is wrong? "My test is the next day" or "My test is on next day"? I know perhaps it is a very basic question but still ...
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0answers
25 views

When someone asks a question but actually just want to answer it themselves

Is there a term for when someone asks a question but you know it’s only because they either want you to ask them it back, or they want to answer it themselves? Hope I’ve explained this properly!
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1answer
18 views

A phrase meaning a drawback turned out to be an advantage

I remember having heard one before but can't say how it went. The phrase says that what initially seemed like a disadvantage — became an advantage. If anyone knows anything even similar to this ...
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0answers
23 views

What does 'to be a story' means?

Could you explain to me, please, what the expression "You are a story" means, used in the following dialogue: A: “You mustn’t pay any attention to old Addie,” she now said to the little girl....
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42 views

How is this example an adjective?

The New Oxford American Dictionary defines one sense of drag to be: Clothing more conventionally worn by the opposite sex, esp. women's clothes worn by a man: a fashion show, complete with men in ...
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1answer
17 views

There's no dessert like this vs. There's no such dessert as this

I was wondering if the following statements mean the same. There's no dessert like this. There's no such dessert as this. It seems obvious to me that the second one could mean something like: There's ...
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9 views

I need to know the meaning of the following sentence: we will have this boat fixed

"We'll have this boat fixed." Doesn't it sound like they are gonna employ someone do this job? But here is the thing they are themselves doing this job. So what does it mean?
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1answer
21 views

Have started to do something OR be starting to do something?

I have come across such sentences many times but it is difficult to understand the difference between these two types. Examples: "It has started to rain." OR "It is starting to rain.&...
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1answer
22 views

Is this sentence correct: “What is correct in exercise 4”?

is that sentence correct: "Which one is the correct answer in exercise 5? A, B or C?" Or: "In ex. 4 the correct answer is..." Is the perposition "in" correct? Is there a ...
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1answer
72 views

Did “A F” exist as an intensifier prior to social media?

"A F" is short for "as fuck". It popped into my lexicon a few years ago, when I started hearing it in Youtube videos. The earliest entry in Urban Dictionary I can find is from 2011....
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0answers
13 views

Decoxide vs decaoxide?

Now, I know that this is more of a science question, but it's more on the English-y side of science, so I'm here. I'm doing a science worksheet and I came across an opportunity to write either "...
4
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2answers
172 views

What is a word for someone who is speaking in a way to gain sympathy from you?

If someone was trying to persuade you to do something, you might say "he spoke convincingly." What is a similar word for someone who is speaking in a way to gain sympathy from you? Hope this ...
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17 views

What does “not to look over the best scenes” mean in the following sentence?

... a detailed analysis will help them to notice the most important film elements and not to look over the best scenes. I think that means that a good review of a movie (the full text is about that) ...
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20 views

I am writing a letter to a landlord whom I have met once before but I can’t remember her name… And I am trying to find a decent way to address her.C

I just finished an application for a house that I am hoping to rent. However, I am thinking that I should probably add a letter explaining my situation and why I am looking to rent a new home in the ...
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0answers
14 views

Should I write article for “the natural flavour of the/X ingredients”?

This is the sentence: As he was taught by that chef, he cooks in an Italian style that brings out the natural flavour of the/X ingredients. I don't mention ingredients before this sentence.
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1answer
23 views

“I prefer living as a pained human being over living as a happy animal” Does it sound natural?

Does this sentence sound natural? "I prefer living as a pained human being over living as a happy animal" Can we call a person who is in pain "a pained person"?
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0answers
39 views

Are there any research papers detailing how the word “apple” became so popular in so many phrases?

Are there any research papers or related scholarly sources that analyze the uses of the word "apple" and it's origins. For example some phrases are: "Don't compare apples to oranges.&...
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4answers
62 views

Are magnets sticky?

A common definition of sticky is Having the property of adhering or sticking to a surface; adhesive. Is there any reason its not correct to call magnets sticky, even though they can be described as ...
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0answers
12 views

Which one to use “a major part of” or “the major part of”?

When do we use "a" or "the" before "major part of" or just "part of"? as in the examples of: "I use the major part of my energy on studies" "I ...
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15 views

How can I use “such” to give example?

To say I'll give example I can say simply "as in the below example of: A or B" Can I also say? "such as the below example of: A or B" OR "such as IN the below example of: A or ...
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0answers
20 views

Is “thanks for signing up for” stylistically acceptable English?

When writing an email for a newsletter, I wrote the following: Thanks again for signing up for our event! After reading it over a few times, it seemed kind of off due to the repetition of the word &...
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1answer
13 views

Use 'is or 'was' for imagined situation

What is the correct way to write this - it's an imagined, hypothetical situation: How would you help a client who was suicidal? Or is it How would you help a client who is suicidal?
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16 views

Why use “will” instead of “would” in this case

My teacher of Grammar at university told us that when we report a speech that was said in the past, we replace "will" by "would". However, in this example, she used "will"...
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0answers
27 views

It would take too long to write and read

If you had to write a math equation, you probably wouldn’t write, “Twentyeight plus fourteen equals fortytwo.” (1)It would take too long to write and (2)it would be hard to read quickly. You would ...
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1answer
35 views

Looking for a word describing what you are asking for in a trade

For example, if I want to trade my widget for someone else's trinket, I would refer to the widget as my "offer". What word could I use to describe the trinket, the item I hope to receive? ...
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1answer
25 views

Sirius the Dog Star shines brightly

If I wanted to refer to the magnitude (brightness) of Sirius, would "Sirius's magnitude" be a (the?) correct form for placing the ending 's' and apostrophe? I always get confused about ...
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0answers
43 views

Minimizing the Number of Syllables when Pronouncing Years

Question Do native English speakers minimize the number of syllables when they pronounce years? Furthermore, is there linguistics/psychology literature on this phenomenon? Observations Here is a ...
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40 views

Using “sunset” and similar words outside the Solar System

Is it acceptable to use the words sunset, sunlight, and even simply sun in the context of the local star, when the setting is a star system outside our own? Furthermore, what about using the above in ...
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0answers
21 views

Can “raise a point” and “make a point” mean the same thing generally?

I personally think "to raise a point" means "to mention some point of interest" while "to make a point" means "to state or demonstrate something of particular ...
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0answers
22 views

Which article do I have to use for 'uniform taste'?

This is the sentence: The chef underlines the use of basic ingredients for a/X/the uniform taste.
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0answers
38 views

The description of a woman's haircut

While reading a short story I met the description of a woman's haircut. That is here: She had close-cut hair which stood up on the very top of her head exactly like a sea wave. I can't imagine the ...
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0answers
18 views

In the following sentence, how many places with passive voice are there?

Consider the sentence: The matter reported by the news is prohibited by the law. "is prohibited" is passive voice here, but what about "reported by the news"? Is it passive voice ...
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2answers
46 views

How do 'within' and 'which' form a relative pronoun clause?

Routines offer a structure within which to prepare for performance. I'm having trouble untangling the relative pronoun clause into a sentence of its own. At first glance, the two sentences combined ...
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2answers
88 views

Are /t, p, k/ aspirated when they are at the start of a syllable after another syllable that ends in /s/?

In English (native speakers' speech), voiceless plosives such as /t/, /p/ and /k/ are produced with a strong burst of air when they are in the start of a syllable before a vowel. That is called "...
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3answers
51 views

“behind the open door are hidden several differences”. Is this grammatically correct? (Inversion+adverbial phrase of location+be verb) [duplicate]

Behind the open door are hidden several differences. This seems to be an inversion of the sentence Several differences are hidden behind the open door. Both sound intuitively correct, but the ...
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1answer
23 views

When using conjunctions in a question to connect two sentences, should I add a comma before the conjunction?

When using conjunctions in a question to connect two sentences, should I add a comma before the conjunction? For example, Why did you leave me to be like this ,and disappear without a single trace? ...
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0answers
32 views

Usage of 'fit' as tight

In Indian languages I have seen the usage of the word 'fit' as being used to imply something is too-tight. In a Gujarati the sentence would use the word 'fit' to describe a garment that is too tight ...
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0answers
11 views

Meaning of Inward and Outward Interest in the context

I am not able to understand the the context in which inward and outward are being used. (I know inward for introvert, and outward for extrovert), but what does inward interest and outward interest ...
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1answer
37 views

“Make an apology” vs “give an apology”

I've seen a BrE textbook stating that only one is correct ("give"). But I don't believe that to be true. Are both correct? Do they have different usage? Are there differences between AmE and ...
1
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1answer
49 views

What is another word for “ugly side”?

What is another word for "ugly side"? How do I say "X reveals the ugly side of Y" in another way? Edit: Sorry, I should've made this clearer. I wanted another word for "ugly ...
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9answers
989 views

Word describing a distinct absence of intellectual curiosity?

Is there any adjective that means "not intellectually curious", but which isn't simply the opposite of a more common word, like 'incurious' and 'uninterested'? I found some ideas from the ...
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0answers
17 views

How to understand the meaning of this as…as sentence seems to be self-contradictory?

This time I encountered a seemingly self-contradictory sentence from a book: It's easy to see that locate is as simple as find is complicated. Apparently, simple and complicated are two words with ...
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1answer
22 views

Can I use ''and'' in a conditional clause?

Can I use ''and'' in a conditional clause ? for instance : if you had exersised, and had followed a healthy diet, you would be fit
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1answer
40 views

What does the “over 8m fewer people” mean?

I've read a sentence from the economist,which is as follows Over 8m fewer people are in work than before the pandemic. I think it looks very strange because why people could be over and fewer at the ...
2
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2answers
41 views

How to identify the form and function of the word “that”?

I understand that "that" can be either a relative pronoun or a subordinating conjunction, I just don't understand when. I know that both of these create dependent clauses, and I am pretty ...

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