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Questions tagged [writing-style]

Questions about writing style in English

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1answer
30 views

Writing “U-shaped” and “V-shaped” in novel

If you are describing a valley as U-shaped, what is the correct way to write that in a novel. U-shaped U shaped u shaped u-shaped "U" shaped "U"-shaped other variations?
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0answers
25 views

Regarding essay conclusions, can you add a discussion of your arguments? [on hold]

Discussions such as why that argument may be wrong etc?
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0answers
27 views

Combining Access request /revoke in one line [or is it better to split for clarity purposes]

Dear English language experts, I am writing to you from the perspective of an end user, who submits IT requests every now and then. When a request needs to be submitted, there is a special web form ...
45
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6answers
7k views

What is the type of English used in the King James Bible called?

In the King James Version (KJV) of the Bible, there is a distinct type of English present (this passage from Job 1:7-12): And the LORD said unto Satan, Whence comest thou? Then Satan answered the ...
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1answer
74 views

Should the first instance of an author-made word in a work use an accent mark? [closed]

If an author makes up proper nouns for their text, for example, Bilgebauth, should the very first instance in the text be typeset with an accent: Bilgebáuth to inform the reader of the proper stress ...
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0answers
28 views

Proper way to introduce a term by two names in writing [duplicate]

When introducing a term that can go by more than one name, it is common to mention the name followed by "or", the second name, and then the rest of the statement, explanation, or what have you. When ...
0
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1answer
33 views

I need to write my expectations from a job [closed]

I`m looking for a job as a developer, so I need to write my expectations for the job. Am I right grammatically writing this into my CV? I am looking for opportunities for professional growth and ...
1
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0answers
73 views

Styles of prepositional phrase, noun phrases and verb phrases

May I ask how does a prepositional phrase, noun phrase and verb phrase sound different to you as native speakers, when they are used to convey the same meaning in a sentence? Editors working on my ...
0
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1answer
49 views

What is the difference between “cohesion” and “coherence” in writing? [closed]

What is the difference between "cohesion" and "coherence" in writing? Is it possible for a piece of writing to have "cohesion" without "coherence" (or vice versa)? And would you say an effective ...
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0answers
20 views

Which words are typical for the books or for the so-called “book vocabulary” specifically?

My experience in English literature is quite limited yet, and thus I can't recall any words that we're most likely to encounter in a book rather than in a spoken or in a neutral language. The terms ...
1
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3answers
88 views

Is “mild person” positive or negative characteristic?

I want to use in my ad poster "Be mild" slogan in the meaning of "Be calm." Is "mild person" positive or negative characteristic? As I know, a mild person is humble and meek — the opposite of bold. ...
0
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1answer
64 views

A dot in the middle of the sentence

I want to ask for your advice. Is it correct to put a dot in the middle of the sentence after the name of a book or a document? Or shall I put the name of a book in quotation marks? For example: ...
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0answers
14 views

How to cite a citation thats meant to give context as part of a discussion

How to use citations that are meant to give more historical or just larger context possibly needed for details of certain things, but not The integrality gap of this LP is related to the Erdos Posa ...
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2answers
45 views

Punctuation and listing two elements (when one of them is a list)

Wolf is a referee who provides scholarly peer review to the Israel Science Foundation and with the following journals:Journal of Public Economics, Journal of the Association of Environmental and ...
1
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0answers
24 views

APA reference for uppercase word in title of book

I need to complete references for an assignment in APA format, but one of the books has an uppercase word in it and I'm not sure if it should remain uppercase or be changed to lowercase: The SAGE ...
0
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1answer
38 views

“This is what I understand” or “This is how I understand it”, etc

Which one of the following statements is correct or do all of them make sense? System A works independently and does not affect System B. This is what I understand. System A works independently ...
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2answers
64 views

What ways do you describe changing from existence to non-existence?

In a paper, I need to talk about things "coming into and leaving" existence multiple times. I feel this phrase is clumsy and there are definitely better ways of saying it that I just can't think of ...
0
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1answer
49 views

How do you punctuate “ So basically” when it appears at the beginning of the sentence?

How should I write it: So, basically, we had to pay the fine. So basically we had to pay the fine. So, basically we had to pay the fine. OR So basically, we had to pay the ...
0
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1answer
65 views

Is there a difference between “I am male” and “I am a male”?

Both versions seem grammatically correct to me, since the word "male" can be either a noun or an adjective, so it can be used with and without an article. But I wonder, is there any difference in ...
0
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1answer
61 views

When to drop AD and BC from dates?

I see some texts using AD and BC or BCE and CE. But other texts just have the date, like 1992 and it is understood. Is there a rule of thumb for when to add these prefixes? I'm using Chicago-Turabian.
1
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1answer
41 views

Device v. Appliance

I'm wondering what the exact difference between device and appliance may be. First thoughts would be that it might be based on either size, level of technology, ubiquity, or value. Perhaps a device ...
0
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2answers
48 views

Is this sentence understandable? “Gained the most points every round in 50+ games”

I'm writing some in-game descriptions for various challenges. One of the challenges is to win 50 games, whilst also having the most points in every round of said games. I arrived at this formulation:...
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1answer
44 views

What is the correct way to refer to someone during when they previously held a different rank/position/title?

Many public officials have accomplished much over the course of their careers, having served in various capacities over the years. For example, Leon Panetta represented CA's 17th district in the ...
1
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0answers
57 views

Write without using pronouns extensively

I have just started learning English as my third language and struggling to write meaningful short essay without using pronouns extensively. I read mainly non-fiction English books and perhaps that ...
0
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1answer
36 views

How to properly format “systems as diverse as X and Y”?

I'd like to express that a certain framework is very versatile and can model a wide array of phenomena. What I have so far is This setup is extremely general, and allows for modeling systems as ...
2
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2answers
41 views

Using a “colon” after “is” or “this”

I've seen this a few times now and it confuses me, especially when my editor does it. According to the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition, a colon can only be used where a period could. In other ...
10
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7answers
736 views

There is no question that you will not misunderstand this sentence

The MacMillan Dictionary has the following definition for the phrase 'there is no question that': used for saying that something is definitely true It gives the example: There is no question ...
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0answers
46 views

punctuation: the 20 to 30 year old age group

I'd like to know how "the 20 to 30 year old age group" is punctuated in standard English. "30-year-old" should be hyphenated. What about "20 to 30"? Any principles at work? I'd appreciate your help.
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0answers
16 views

CMS: The case f “Based on” [duplicate]

How would you capitalize a heading that includes "based on" according to the Chicago Manual of Style?
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1answer
65 views

When should you repeat the same subject in a compound sentence?

I'd like to know when it is required to repeat the pronoun after a clause or an interjection within the same phrase. For example, which of these two phrases would be considered correct: I've recently ...
1
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0answers
18 views

When a proper noun is converted into a verb, should it be capitalized? [duplicate]

If a proper noun (e.g. Google) is converted into a verb (e.g. Let me (G/g)oogle that for you), should it still be capitalized when used as a verb? I recognize that English has no such concept as a "...
0
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1answer
37 views

What is the meaning of '…' and '--' when encountered in a dialogue? [closed]

While reading novels I come across'...' and '--'. (Three dots or a long dash). I was assuming it means a long pause but I am confused of alternate usages.
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0answers
27 views

Is it ok to have a semicolon after a colon or em dash? (or other variations)

I've looked all over but have not found this example. Can one use a semicolon after a colon or em-dash (or similar doubling up combinations). Is it a matter of style or is there a fast rule? e.g.: ...
0
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1answer
60 views

Verb order — which way is right?

In the sentence: "Over the airwaves, following a commercial, played the melancholy piano chords from Moonlight Sonata." — Can "play" go in that position? It does sound strange to me, but if I ...
1
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0answers
21 views

bracket usage dilemma

If I include a reference at the end of a sentence where it is already included in a bracketed phrase, do you put one or two brackets to close? E.g. Goldilocks and her friend found that bears were ...
0
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1answer
54 views

Apologize for misunderstanding

My English not very good, especially if I have to comply some formal standards. I understand it pretty well, but when I have to construct a sentence I face some difficulties. So I will try to explain ...
3
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1answer
76 views

Religious names in index. How do you order and present? [closed]

I have a book that discusses Catholicism. I would like to know if there are any established resources that advise on listing religious names in indexes, where the norm is reversal of surnames and ...
0
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0answers
18 views

Is it grammatically correct to omit a comma after dialogue ending in an ellipsis? [duplicate]

I know that Grammarly isn't always correct but before tonight, I didn't know punctuation directly after an ellipsis was grammatically correct, even in special circumstances such as dialogue. Unless ...
7
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3answers
2k views

How to write numbers and percentage?

In the sentence – Auditors recommend an increase of the allowance for bad debts by ten %. – should the percent sign be there or should the word percent be spelled out. Also should the number be ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

'some degree of' - a little or a lot?

I'm a native English speaker, but I recently had reason to suspect I had misunderstood 'some degree of'. E.g., I can repair your car. It needs some degree of work before it will be ready As part of ...
0
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2answers
54 views

“go too far” — suitable for academic writing?

I am revising the following sentence in an academic paper: The de facto XXX seems to go too far and notably undermine the readability. where XXX is a named of a new technique. I feel like "go too ...
6
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4answers
1k views

When quoting someone, is it proper to change “gotta” to “got to” without modifying the rest of the quote?

Lately, when I read quotes in the media, I've seen the following styles: Spoken: "I gotta try harder." Written: "I got to try harder." Is is just my stupid ear/eye/brain that does a record scratch ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Neologism: I am introducing a new term in my thesis for a concept but I am cautious [closed]

Is it arrogant in writing to explicitly say I came up with the term? Fear of appearing arrogant made me think to just say: X will be used throughout the thesis to refer to the concept of Y without ...
2
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2answers
93 views

What are the real rules for choosing between the simple past and past perfect when both actions are in the past?

What are the real rules for choosing past perfect versus choosing past simple when you have two different past actions? I ask because the English sequence of tenses rules I was taught would have ...
1
vote
1answer
28 views

Word for kind of descriptive/metaphoric style

On a web-show called Bravest Warriors there is a character called Paralyzed Horse. He has a tendency to make these interesting monologues and I was curious if there was a name for the kind of language ...
0
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1answer
64 views

you owe me and you owe my [closed]

I read all the answers about "owe" but I am still confused. My question is not about the meaning of sentences, it's clear but which grammar rule is used in these sentences: I owe you some money (and ...
-1
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1answer
16 views

Grammar clarification on a sentence [closed]

I am using this statement in my job application's cover letter. " Kindly requesting to consider my career interest and immediate availability." Mentioned sentence is showing it as grammar error. ...
0
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0answers
27 views

In American English are the following three examples good to use for colon capitalization useage? [duplicate]

I know that a variant of this question has been asked before, and recalled what my Creative writing teacher told me about when to use capitalization after a colon, by using the following three example ...
0
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1answer
45 views

Which method should I use in writing? [closed]

When I am writing, should I let my thoughts flow naturally on the paper, or should I meticulously think them through and form full sentences out of them before putting them to paper? I'm really not ...
1
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0answers
82 views

Is ‘the reason why’ somehow objectionable?

It has just come to my attention that some consider ‘the reason why’ ungrammatical or otherwise unfortunate. David Crystal mentions it in his introduction to Fowler's Dictionary of Modern English ...