Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

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Reason, Discourse and Language

Reason (as in the cognitive skill, human property, logic latu sensu, thought) is translated in Greek as Λόγος. But Λογος is also the ability and the skill of persons to speak, write and word their ...
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1 answer
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How to use "cachinnate" in a sentence? [closed]

I don't understand how to use cachinnate in a sentence. Is it correct to say "I'm sorry to cachinnate at you" or "I couldn't stop cachinnating"? How could I use this word in daily ...
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1 vote
5 answers
219 views

Is there a term for someone who takes a long time explaining simple things?

Is there a term for someone who takes a long time to explain simple things, but goes through the complicated ones very briefly? We had a refresher course on a software we already use, the presenter ...
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1 answer
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Using the phrase “strong use of the word…”

Conventionality, what quality is being measured as either weak or strong when this phrase is used? In other words, does one use a word strongly when she applies an adjective to herself or to ...
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0 votes
0 answers
38 views

Bona Fide meaning? [duplicate]

I was learning about the word "bona fide" and I came across many definitions, some said, it means genuine/not fake, some websites said it means done in good faith. If I use bona fide in ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Why women are not called gentle? [duplicate]

Avoj friends I have a question - When the host say "Ladies and gentlemen" why they don't put gentle before Ladies? I think ladies are more gentle than men. Why not it be "men and gentle-...
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0 votes
1 answer
104 views

sentence with "I prefer something to something"

I know for sure that the following 3 sentences are grammatically correct since I took them from the grammar book: I prefer jumping to running. I prefer jumping rather than running. I prefer to jump ...
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4 votes
2 answers
493 views

What is the original superlative form of well?

I know that “well” (as in the adverb “to do well”) has a superlative form, “best,” but this is suppletive, and I’ve always wanted to know what the original, as in, the last, not suppletive, ...
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Why do we sometimes omit and sometimes retain the conjunctions "because/while/when etc" when reducing adverb clauses?

We can reduce this sentence "Because she has a test next week, she is studying very hard." (1-1) -> "Having a test next week, she is studying very hard." (1-2) "Before he ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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He went to the cinema if a good movie was "on". He went to the theater if a good play was "on" or "up"?

A good movie was "on", sounds alright. A good play was "on" doesn't sound right to me. Does "up" work like coming up/scheduled/soon to appear?
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Can the word "pollute" be used as "deprave" in this paragraph?

I heard the phrase "pollution of the mind", so I guess "pollute" can be used as "spoil", "ruin" or "deprave", which affects mental health. I am ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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When did the change occur in meaning of Afghan from an ethnic group to "person from Afghanistan?"

A related question can be found here, dealing with the usage of "Afghan" to mean "inhabitant of Afghanistan." Which term is correct — "Afghan" or "Afghani"? I'm ...
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Why *remedy* means school term break?

From m-w.com : Definition of remedy (Entry 1 of 2) 1: a medicine, application, or treatment that relieves or cures a disease 2: something that corrects or counteracts 3: the legal means to recover a ...
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1 vote
4 answers
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Does "manifest" mean the same as show and illustrate?

When I describe the information of a graph, can I use manifest instead of show or illustrate? I am a bit hesitant because when I look up manifest in a dictionary, it says the meaning of manifest is ...
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1 answer
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What does 'sweep' mean in the context "The Taliban swept to power"?

My question is brief : What does 'sweep' mean in the context "The Taliban swept to power"? I sweep the floors at work everyday but not once have I swept to power.
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1 answer
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Can the word "diplomacy" be used to refer to a particular form of diplomacy or diplomatic strategy?

I'm thinking of a usage for "diplomacy" such as: "Unlike his predecessor's isolationist policies, Schultz's diplomacy favored providing aid unconditionally to neighbors in the region ...
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2 votes
4 answers
456 views

Can Practice (verb) and Practise (verb) indicate two different meanings?

I recall that at school (in the late 1960s/early 1970s) in England I was taught how and when to use Practice and Practise. What I was taught was this: Practice, when used as a verb, means to do ...
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Is an alien (from outside earth) a someone or a something? [closed]

If I am pointing across the room and there is an animal (let's forget about writing animals in the context of humans - no Animal Farm references) - I would point and say, "there is something over ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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is "make love not violence" grammatically correct or not?

There's a center in Russia that helps victims of sexual assault, and I bought a t-shirt from them with the slogan "make love not violence" but as I started to think about this phrase, it ...
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3 votes
0 answers
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"Yeap" and "yep" and "yeah" [duplicate]

Is the use of "Yeap" and "yep" and "yeah", more predominant in different English speaking countries, or is it more a matter of personal preference? UPDATE: The ...
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1 answer
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Can "Pend" be used as a transitive verb? [closed]

I found myself writing a sentence as follows: I will pend the investigation for now. Only to realise that I wasn't sure if it was appropriate to use pend as a verb in this sense. While not a logical ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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Is "trivial" a suitable word to describe a low-class car?

"Trivial" means "having little value or importance," but I'm not sure if it is an appropriate word to describe a low-class car in the following sentence. My car's too trivial to ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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What exactly is a "building" in the UK?

My question relates specifically to multi-storey residential buildings with several flats on each floor. Not necessarily high-rises or a "block of flats". An example would be the following ...
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0 votes
1 answer
142 views

Is "they are both the same" appropriate?

Statements like "These pens are both the same" don't seem right. "These pens are the same" works. But for the first statement to work, it seems that one would have to be able to ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Is it ok to use convicted as an adjective in this sense?

The word "convicted" is generally used as the following: "A convicted criminal" "He was convicted" However, I wanted to show that someone did something with conviction,...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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'' to '' meaning ? which one?

What is the meaning of the preposition "to" in these sentences? The shoulder is proximal to the elbow. The ribs are lateral to the lungs. to : used for saying where someone or something ...
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10 votes
4 answers
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lie vs fabricate. When to use which one in what situation?

I'm having hard time distinguishing between these words and come to ask you gracious people for help. I recently learned the word "fabricate". I got into the dictionary for more details, and ...
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1 answer
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Is it correct to say, “justification for and reference to your answer”?

I want to shorten the words “justification for your answer and reference to your answer” by saying, “justification for and reference to your answer”. Is this shorter form correct? If not, how should I ...
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4 votes
1 answer
93 views

Identify specific usage of "now" as adverb or conjunction

I am trying to figure out the meaning of "now" in some contexts. I've seen its full use in the Cambridge dictionary and in MacMillan Dictionary; however, it isn't clear to me in some ...
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2 votes
3 answers
134 views

How is the word "wrangle" used in Europe?

I'm starting a new online business in the US, and hope to attract customers in Europe as well. I'm thinking about using the word wrangler in the name of the business. The meaning I'm intending is &...
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1 answer
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In a short story, can I write "ahhhhh!" as an exclamation of the surprise experienced by a group of young kids? [closed]

-“Ahhhhhh!” they all exclaimed in unison.
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6 votes
2 answers
490 views

Collective equivalent of 'albeit'?

I was after the collective equivalent of albeit, if such a word exists? Here's what I used: There are some packages and tools available (albe them nowhere near as mature as those found in other ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Dictate vs Instruct (Which context or vibe it used for?)

I recently found the word "dictate". As always, I dived into the dictionary and took a look for definition. Following is what I found. Dictate to give orders, or tell someone exactly what ...
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1 vote
1 answer
684 views

Take advice vs follow advice

To take advice is usually defined as: obtain information and guidance, typically from an expert. Lexico By this definition, there is no implication that the advice is actually followed. But can take ...
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1 answer
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Athletics singular or plural?

The following sentence appears in the book 'Improve Your Grammar', Harper Collins Publishers, p.118: Athletics give many deprived kids a great chance in life. There is a comment on this, '... as ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Usage of Callipygian / Callipygous

I am not at all familiar with this word. Oxford dictionary defines Callipygian as adjective (rare) having well-shaped buttocks. DERIVATIVES callipygous | ˌkalɪˈpɪdʒəs, ˌkalɪˈpʌɪdʒəs | adjective I ...
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1 vote
4 answers
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The use of the term "agreeability" when comparing two results

I'm writing a scientific paper about two obtained results: an experimental result and a numerical one. Because the two agree well with each other, I may use the term "agreeability" to ...
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0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Sentence formation [duplicate]

Why in many sentences do we use verbs before pronouns such as we write in a question? For example: Neither did I try nor did I want to. She told me that I can improve my grades, and boy was she right....
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1 vote
1 answer
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Word for when something has no purpose other than to look pretty? [duplicate]

I'm trying to describe a character who is a young actress. she is exploited in the industry and basically has no purpose other than a means of 'looking pretty' or just being 'another pretty face'?? I ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Cynicism: Is one usage-sense close to pessimism? [closed]

I think I have come across uses of cynicism in modern contexts where it seems close to pessimism. The dictionary definitions available are pointing towards cynics being ones who make judgements on ...
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3 votes
5 answers
633 views

What verb can be used transitively with the noun "bridge"?

Imagine an unsurpassable abyss between you and some kind of other side. And although you know you can't possibly make it, you still jump with a mad hope to make it to the safety of that other side. ...
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2 votes
2 answers
386 views

Starting a sentence with 'Well, ...'

I've been noticing this quite a bit, where people start with "Well, ..." in response to questions/comments that may be naively-posed (from their perspective). It sounds like it's used in ...
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0 votes
0 answers
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to have desire vs to have a desire

She added that she does "not have desire to interact with or communicate in any way with Mr. Sweet". (Independent) Every day we do crossing and finishing and we have to have desire to get ...
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1 vote
1 answer
317 views

What does the term "ticky-tacky" in the song "Little Boxes" mean and what is its etymology? [closed]

The song "Little Boxes" by Malvina Reynolds has these lyrics: Little boxes on the hillside Little boxes made of ticky-tacky Little boxes on the hillside Little boxes all the same There's a ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Is "speed dial" really an obsolete term by now? or is the term here to stay?

This website https://www.wikihow.com/Set-Speed-Dial-on-Android says "speed dial" is a bit obsolete, but I don't understand why wikihow.com says this because I can enter phone numbers into my ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What is the appropriate term for a brochure with maps and shop information of the shopping mall?

I'm wondering what the appropriate term is for a brochure that you can find at a shopping mall or department store — like 10 pages — that shows you the floor map + brief information on the shops. ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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Can someone suggest another term for “social fact”?

Social facts are things such as institutions, norms and values which exist external to the individual and constrain the individual. The problem I’m getting is that “fact” means a truth, at least to ...
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1 vote
1 answer
89 views

Can "dislike" be used when you disagree with something

Can the word "dislike" be used to disagree with a statement? Sometimes I've seen people write "I dislike that" after someone made a statement, and I don't understand if that means ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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How is “in but few” used in this sentence? [duplicate]

Sentence taken from Tchaikovsky’s textbook of Harmony, page 55 (middle of the page) “The chord of the sixth and fourth can be effectively employed in but few cases. These are as follows:” What ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Can away function like a verb (not a phrasal verb) [closed]

I would like to know if away can be used as a verb, can I say I away from here? or use this kind of structure, I looked upon different dictionaries but couldn't find any use of away as a verb, does it ...
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