Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

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In a line graph report, can the verb “to wave” be used as a synonym of “to oscillate”? [closed]

Is this sentence right? The prices wave from 30 to 60 dollars.
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What does "crucial mistake" mean? [closed]

As far as I know crucial means something like of great importance. So when someone says "It was a crucial mistake" does it mean: It was very important for that mistake to occur (or else ...
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Difference between approximate and approximative [closed]

French is my native language and "approximative location" sounds better to my native tongue. However I'm surprised that google spell checker is correcting "approximative location" ...
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Pls i need to know the correct word to use [closed]

This message is meant to be sent to mrs jane and this message is meant to be send to mrs jane, which one is correct
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Does the adjective 'unspoken' make sense in the context of this sentence? [closed]

Does 'unspoken' fit the following sentence? He stared up at the gang's unspoken leader. It's never been declared that the bully the sentence refers to is actually the head of said gang, but everyone ...
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Is "head data" a true alternative to "header data"?

Our software uses the term "head data" for which I think should be called "header data". If I look up the German translation "Kopfdaten" on Leo, I only get "header ...
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1 vote
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"a bit" vs. "some"

Disclaimer: I'm a German native. I'm working on some software with a coworker from US. He just sent a message saying "if we decide to actually publish this as a real package, I'd like to clean it ...
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What would be the modern equivalent of " ... is around the corner yet"?

Here's a neat article covering the differences between yet and still: https://keydifferences.com/difference-between-still-and-yet.html There is, in Mark Twain's Connecticut Yankee, a sentence that ...
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when to use move-in vs move in in general english [duplicate]

is there a difference between move in vs move-in? It seems to be the same 'Want to move in to my house?' vs 'Want to move-in to my house?'
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The meaning of “whacked” [closed]

I’ve recently heard about the word “whacked” as having the meaning of being tired and exhausted. When I searched for examples in movies using this expression, it seemed to me that there were other ...
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1 answer
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Can the word 'partner' mean 'customer/client'?

My question stems from the fact that the word 'partner' is excessively used in the former USSR countries when referring to or addressing their customers/clients/buyers. Russian-speaking manufacturers/...
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1 answer
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Is ‘platform’ used correctly in the intended sense in this context? [closed]

Dating websites and dating apps are today very popular, but we don’t know how successful finding relationship via such platforms is. What percent of those using dating platforms find the right partner?...
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Using "Nominal" in software engineering

I hope this doesn't sound like a silly question but recently some work was done on some software and someone asked me if everything was working and I responded "everything is looking nominal"...
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1 answer
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Is the use of words "institute" and "college" together in naming an institution right?

Is it right to use the words "institute" and "college" in naming an educational institution namely "Institute of Public Policy & Leadership College"? It is an ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Is "none" when used alone without antecedent singular or plural (for context, I'm talking about people): "None [are/is] here"?

I know that "none of [...]" can be both singular or plural, but when I use it alone in a sentence, without the "of" and without any other nouns, can it be both singular and plural ...
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1 answer
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throwing roses in the museum gallery to slack-jawed guests

The Associated Press (AP) has printed the following story, where the boldfaced "to" is used: PARIS (AP) — A man seemingly disguised as an old woman in a wheelchair threw a piece of cake at ...
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1 vote
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What is the difference between "presume" and "preassume"?

Preassume (third-person singular simple present preassumes, present participle preassuming, simple past and past participle preassumed) (transitive) To assume in advance; to presume. Wiktionary How ...
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Why isn't it "I will have been running, lest they have been catching me"?

The phrase in the title is obviously incorrect; however, I'm having difficulties figuring out how it could actually be grammatically constructed. To be clear, I'm aware this is a ridiculous ...
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Is This Sentence Grammaticaly acceptble? [migrated]

Can I say [I insisted on that the event was a turkey]? I know that we say: sb insists on sth. But I didn't know before yesterday that we can say: sb insists that So is it common or correct to say: ...
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4 votes
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The origin of and the difference between primogenitor, primogeniture and progenitor

In Etymonline, the etymology of primogenitor (and primogeniture) is very similar to progenitor. The word's meaning: Ancestor or forefather. However, nowhere do I find the reason of the split from the ...
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Even if I'm not the author-in-question, would the subtitle, "A Chrestomathic Compendium" be appropriate for the following[?]:

This work would be a "Selections" or "Compendium" of works by an author, where I select passages, quotes, or otherwise an ordering of his works, wholesale, given in an order that ...
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10 votes
12 answers
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Is it considered rude or inappropriate to frequently address others as "friend" - often in a disingenuous fashion?

Recently, I have encountered (what I think is) a fairly common usage of the word "friend" that I consider to be insincere and offensive, but when I brought this up with the offending party, ...
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Difference between roaring 20s and raging 20s?

One article A recession in America by 2024 looks likely from The Economist has a subtitle named: From the roaring to the raging 2020s From Google's online Dictionary(which is from Oxford): roaring ...
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1- How do you like to be when...? 2- using close as a verb: get close, approach [migrated]

I had an argument with my teacher. in an exercise of ordering the words to form a sentence, I found a "maybe" strange one. the sentence I made is this: How do you like to be when a business ...
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2 answers
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Does it make sense to use 'untenable' in this context?'

I'm writing about a character who is facing an arranged marriage. Does it make sense to say that, in a situation such as this, developing feelings for someone else is 'untenable'? Are there any other ...
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"a tall price" vs "a high price" [duplicate]

One of the meanings of "tall" from dictionary.com: large in amount or degree; considerable: a tall price As I understood from this definition, "tall" in "a tall price" ...
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22 votes
5 answers
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Why did ‘brainwash’ develop to be a negative word?

I was pondering this recently. Why didn’t the word develop to have positive meaning, as in: you wash your brain from the toxic thoughts, and instead come to mean indoctrination? Are there other words ...
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Is "Annular Ring" redundant? [migrated]

I've come across the term annular ring in parentheses following washer in my calculus textbook: "has the shape of a washer (an annular ring)". The definition of this word in Merriam Webster ...
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To act as [insert profession]

Would it be correct, in English, to say: I acted as an engineer in that company I acted as a lawyer in that firm And, more generally: To act as [profession]
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What does "hell-turding away" mean here?

Just as we were reaching the cottage, we saw two women in the street. One of the women was Old Mrs Adams. She was shouting at another. Hell-turding away. From the book How to Stop Time by Matt Haig
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Confused about which between "does" and "will" should I use [migrated]

Which among these two examples are gramatically correct? A: "DOES the disadvantageous offer still remain on the table?" B: "WILL the disadvantageous offer still remain on the table?&...
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1 vote
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In what varieties of English is "working" used (as a gerund) instead of "work" (as a noun)?

A recent question on the English Language Learners Stack Exchange concerned the use of the phrase "have been knowing" (as opposed to "have known"). While the latter is standard in ...
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How to use he/she (or another word) when we dont know what the other person is a man or woman? [duplicate]

So in meetings, text, documents etc, and speaking to other people we discuss what users should do or will do. So for example, a sentence could be 'the user enter his/her username and then he/she ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What is a good verb to be used with ‘possibilities’ in this context? [closed]

After showing all the restrictions, I will investigate the possibilities that still … for activism. The verbs coming to my mind are hold and maintain. But I don’t know if these are good choices, and ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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What is the usage of "considerably" outside of comparative constructs?

I have noticed that all the examples for "considerably" in Lexico (which is based on the OED, I believe?) are comparatives: considerably [adverb]: By a notably large amount or to a notably ...
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2 answers
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When does "actively mislead" entail an intent to deceive?

Background Sometimes I see the term "actively mislead", but I am not confident when it is implied that something was done intentionally to deceive. A previous question here asked Does "...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Bot, za and the like

The trend of using the last part of words, bot for robot or za for pizza for instance, appears to be from the late ‘60s as suggested by Etymonline: The method of minting new slang by clipping ...
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If I'm ranting I'm the ranter. So is the subject of said rant the rantee? Or the person hearing it? What's the other called, then?

...and do they have a suffix of their own? Cambridge says "-er" is "added to [...] verbs to form nouns that refer to people or things that [do/are performing] that particular activity&...
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1 answer
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What are the origins of "tech" as an abbreviation for "technology?

I'm trying to trace the origins and rise in popularity of the abbreviation "tech" from "technology." From what I can tell, the term began taking off in popular culture around the ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Difference between "provocative" and "thought-provoking"

In some dictionaries, provocative has two meanings: (1) Causing annoyance, anger, or another strong reaction, especially deliberately. (2) Arousing sexual desire or interest Some other dictionaries ...
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29 votes
6 answers
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Is it common for native English speakers to confuse "18th century" with "the 1800s"?

As a non-native English speaker, I've only ever referred to "1700-talet", meaning "the 1700s" or "the 18th century". In English, it's by far most common to say "18th ...
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1 answer
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"I wonder what to start work on" - does it sound fine? [closed]

For example, I'm looking for a task to work on, is it fine to say it?
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Should I use "portion" or "proportion"?

I have some balls, and some percentage q \in (0, 100%) of them are green (for example, q = 30% or 1/3). Should I say "A portion q of the balls are green" or "A proportion q of the balls ...
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Using the word comfort in a sentence?

Is it correct to use "I was in comfort" in a sentence? For example, I was in comfort until my mother woke me up.
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0 answers
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What is the grammar of "I'm home"? [duplicate]

Why do we often say "I'm home" rather than "I'm at home"? How is the former even grammatically correct? Should this be thought of as a use of a "phrasal verb", "to ...
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The use of the word "along"

Say I want someone to fold a rectangular sheet of paper so that I get a cylinder with the longer side as its height. Roll the sheet of paper along its shorter side. Is this correct? Or should it be ...
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Can we use "just like the old times" with present tense?

Can we use "just like the old times" with present tense? For example: She robs trains, just like the old times. Is this correct and natural?
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1 vote
2 answers
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If I say my profession is x, does that imply I am employed right now?

I am not employed right now but I'd like to communicate that if I work, I'd work as x. I don't want them to think I am currently working. Is there a better phrase than My profession is x ?
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1 answer
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How use the word "surge" properly? [closed]

Would it be correct to use the word 'surge' at the very end of a sentence? For instance: X has made Y surge. Or would you rather say X surged Y?
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2 votes
1 answer
385 views

Confused in the usage of "where" in a non-interrogative sentence

I was writing an essay, but I came across a weird sentence: Where peace prevails, justice prevails. In the above sentence, I am confused if the usage of "where" at the beginning of the ...
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