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Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

-2
votes
3answers
232 views

What is the basic difference between Migrant and Immigrant [closed]

Can anyone tell me what is the difference between Migrant and Immigrant . This is a hot topic of today news. I hear and read those terms almost interchangeably. Searching in google and it give me ...
6
votes
1answer
448 views

Boo as a term of endearment

The Cambridge Dictionary defines boo as an AmE expression meaning: (us informal) someone you care about, especially a boyfriend, girlfriend, or other close friend: You will always be my boo....
1
vote
1answer
140 views

One of the few or one of the only

I want to tell my friend that he is among the very few who can make me smile. Here's what sounds more natural to me: You're one of the few people who is good at it(making me smile). Or should I say "...
8
votes
4answers
393 views

Where does “sport” meaning “wear” come from?

To sport something to have or wear something in a proud way: to sport a beard, she was sporting a T-shirt with the company's logo on it. (OLD) The etymology of sport as a verb doesn’t ...
0
votes
1answer
194 views

not going to happen

I'm not sure when to use the phrase "that's not gonna happen". Does it mean it actually will never happen? I think using "not gonna happen" implies that I'm going to do the best I can to keep it from ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

“manuscript” vs “article”

I (a Japanese speaker) have been editing a mathematical coterie magazine which will be distributed in a school (university) festival. My question is below; 1. How should I, as an editor, call the ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

“restart” vs “reset” in the context of a game or puzzle

Given a partially-completed puzzle or game (e.g. sudoku or klondike solitaire), would reverting the puzzle/game to the initial state be considered "restarting", "resetting", or is there a third, ...
0
votes
3answers
150 views

Does the word “ominous” have a positive connotation in “ominous music”?

I have seen many occurrences of the word "ominous" in contexts that do not convey any negative meaning. Maybe the word "ominous" has a particular connotation that I am not aware of. Could you suggest ...
24
votes
5answers
5k views

Is “I” an alphabet or a letter?

I have come across this sentence, "Modi understands only one alphabet, and that is the capital I", in the renowned Indian writer Dr. Shashi Tharoor's recently published book "The Paradoxical Prime ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

“so” and “this” as adverbs meaning “to a degree”

Recently, a non-native speaker asked me whether they should say "Why is it so cold?" or "Why is is this cold?". While clearly the former is much more common, I struggled to explain why. Cambridge ...
3
votes
1answer
175 views

Was Valentino the first person to be called ‘sexy’?

According Etymonline , the term sexy underwent a semantic change in the early 1920s when it was used to for the first time with the connotation of “sexually attractive” in reference to Rudolph ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

The law requires that there shall be no delay [closed]

The law requires that there shall be no delay. Q: In this sentence I think 'should' (not shall) is right. Am I wrong? Thanks in advance!
2
votes
2answers
273 views

What is difference between timetable and schedule?

I'm building an application, that shows schedule/timetable for university students. I'm confusing, what is the correct word for it: schedule or timetable? How should I name it? Here is the result of ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Can the word “there” refer to multiple places?

Probably a silly question, but can the word "there" refer to more than one place? Consider the following sentence: "I visited City A and City B again even though I went there last year." Can "there"...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

All together vs altogether for results

In editing science papers, I routinely come across the phrase "Altogether, these results suggest that..." I have changed it to "All together" because it seems to me that the phrase is referring to ...
1
vote
2answers
294 views

Lay or Lie in “what powers lies between their hands”?

This is for sure a duplicate question, but I'm sorry I'm just getting confused no matter how many articles I read. In the sentence, And still they are not aware what powers lies between their hands!...
0
votes
1answer
60 views

What's the word for describing days/months/years when comparing to something else?

Here's an example of the sentence I'm trying to write: "Monday: the (x) equivalent of falling down a flight of stairs" Some examples of other sentences that are similar to the one I'm trying to ...
0
votes
1answer
18 views

Omitting ',' or not in the case of ', from the cellular level to the organ-system level,'

I read through my textbook and encountered this quote 'Homeostasis is a dynamic condition. In response to changing conditions, the body's parameters can shift among points in a narrow range that is ...
2
votes
2answers
122 views

Word or phrase used to describe someone who controls someone else through possessions or financial means

Not sure if such a phrase or word to describe a person/actions actually exists. Have been using “to lord something over someone,” but this might not be the correct usage. ex1: If someone pays for a ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

Proper usage of tho in a sentence

I would like to properly use tho in my sentence: Tho' I'm small, my effort and guts are risin' Considering it is words spoken by an individual, I would like to know whether or not it is ...
4
votes
1answer
116 views

Can a house have a 'roof' but no 'ceiling' in its upper floor?

A user in the Spanish Language site asked a question about how to distinguish 'ceiling' from 'roof' in Spanish, and gave us the following example: The top floor of my house does not have a ceiling ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Trouble understanding a passage from the Scarlet Letter

Pg 1 of “the Custom House” “... fittingly be addressed only and exclusively to the one heart and mind of perfect sympathy; as if the printed book, thrown at large on the wide world, were certain to ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Why are “help” and “assist” not directly interchangeable in a sentence where the context would remain the same?

I was writing a sentence with the word "help" and wanted to substitute it for the word "assist" but realized I could not do that without restructuring the sentence. My original sentence, "I'll help ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

What is the best noun meaning “getting invaded”?

In a technical formulation, I need to define two opposite states. In particular, the first represents the state of an agent which invades, thereby called invasion. The second one corresponds to the ...
0
votes
2answers
39 views

Should I use had or have?

Should it be 'he told me that they had...' or 'he told me that they have...'? The people he was talking about still have the things presently so which would be correct?
-1
votes
1answer
92 views

Is the word “twee” still used in England? [closed]

I would like to know if the word "twee" is still used in England. If so, in what social context?
1
vote
1answer
51 views

“Anthropomorphize” against another person?

Is there another word for "Anthropomorphize" that could be used against another person. For instance, in the West the vast majority are familiar with 3 meals a day, breakfast, lunch and dinner. ...
0
votes
2answers
35 views

Can the verb “bias” not be used as a verbal in a sentence? (American English)

Whenever I see the verb "bias" being used in a sentence, it is always used as a verbal. Can it be used as a verb (example please!)? If it cannot, is there a special name for verbs that can only be ...
-1
votes
1answer
60 views

Fail in OR to + noun/gerund/infinitive?

TIL: the phrase "fail in + noun/gerund" means: to not be successful in an attempt to do something. and the phrase "fail to + infinitive" means: leave something undone According to the meanings ...
4
votes
2answers
64 views

Is the use of the word “cadence” acceptable in the phrase rocket launch cadence?

Rocket launches have traditionally required a certain delay between one and the next, so if there are say 20 per year at a given site, the assume some degree of ordered spacing between one and the ...
-1
votes
1answer
79 views

Succeed in OR to +?

The king succeeds in the throne The king succeeds in claiming the throne The king succeeds to the throne The king succeeds to claim the throne Which are acceptable? & what are the ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

The same + singular or plural noun?

I know that we can say: You have the same book as me/I do. How about: You and I have the same books. You and I have the same book. What are the differences between them? Thank you
0
votes
1answer
150 views

Difference between should, must, can, may [duplicate]

Difference between should, must, can, may in a conversation and a sentence.
2
votes
1answer
116 views

Can you use destroyed for animals? [closed]

Is such a sentence correct: Humans destroyed the animal in an inhumane way. Can I use the words "destroy" and "inhumane" in such a construction? Because I think using the word kill is much better. ...
4
votes
2answers
833 views

similar to or similarly to

Using the example "to obtain similar to or similarly to," the latter sounds very strange even though similarly is definitely being used as an adverb. The sentence: "The fragments were obtained similar ...
-1
votes
1answer
56 views

The usage of the word “nature” for a basic constituent of something [closed]

Someone has given me two example of the usage of the word nature. A water molecule consists of two different natures: (1) Oxygen and (2) Hydrogen or (H2O). Whenever we mention the word “...
2
votes
1answer
28 views

“The Gaussian elimination” or “Gaussian elimination”?

I have seen it used without a quantifier in my textbook, but I don’t see how it doesn’t need one. Some example sentences: The LU factorization leads to another perspective on Gaussian elimination. ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

What does the closing date mean exactly? [closed]

There is a competition I am entering and the closing date is tomorrow (the 3rd of November). Does that mean they won't accept any of the entry's tomorrow or will tomorrow be the last day they accept ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

Can you say “very thrilled”?

I recently learned about strong adjectives and the fact that you shouldn't use "very" with them, because their definition already includes "very". E.g., "thrilled" -- i.e., very happy, you can't say "...
1
vote
1answer
46 views

Can you say “go in over your head” instead of “be in over your head”?

This dictionary says that "in over your head" is typically used with "be" or "get", but can you use it with "go"? For example: "I'm taking so many courses on coursera that I forget everything ...
1
vote
1answer
109 views

no more vs. no longer [closed]

what is the difference between 'no more' and 'no longer'? Can those always replace each other? A book says, There were no longer wolves on the island. There would no longer be too many deer on the ...
2
votes
2answers
58 views

Correct verb to be use with bow and arrow

What is the more accurate verb that should be used with shooting an arrow?  Should it be “shoot” or “launch”? e.g., I shot an arrow. I launched an arrow. I used to think “shot” is the correct word ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

use of “the” for dates

Is it fine to write during the second half of 4th century B.C. or is it preferable to write during the second half of the 4th century B.C.
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Can ellipsis be followed by a pronoun like “YOU”?

I'm trying to quote someone's tweet and planning to use the ellipsis as a pause in my sentence (due to showing an aggressive attitude) * You... SNOB! Stop gossiping about me! Correct?
4
votes
1answer
257 views

another twin or the other twin?

Usually, when there are two things, we say "one", and "the other". However, I came across the following expression: one twin to another. Of course, a pair of twins is made up with two people. ...
-2
votes
1answer
60 views

Is whom actually a word? [closed]

I research up the word "whom" but, the internet keeps changing it to "who". So, I wanted to confirm if whom is a actual word. For example, before I search up "whom" and the internet asked me do you ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

What's the difference between too and so?

I'm trying to explain the subtle difference between "too" and "so" in the following sentence (from a child's book) to someone whose first language is not English. But I'm struggling. "That's not my ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

what's the usage of “then” in the sentence below?

the context: As the children walked home, they saw a pretty tree. A: "Oh, what a pretty tree!" B: "Then stay away from it!!!!" A: "No, you're not gonna start again! This time it does ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

How to ask what is your number in the siblings or to your parents.? [duplicate]

How to ask what is your number in the siblings or to your parents