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Questions tagged [word-usage]

This tag is for questions about correctly using a word. The word has to be provided within the question. The question should be limited to the usage of one word. For the usage of complete phrases there is the tag phrase-usage.

0
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1answer
53 views

Is it awkward to use the verb “to mint” with “law”?

Would it be awkward to use the verb "to mint" with "law" ? For instance: "Minted in 1962, this law ..."
1
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2answers
53 views

Is there a word for the opposite side of 'tip'?

I would like to write something like 'A marker is mounted on the tail of the surgical instrument'. Is 'tail' a formal word to describe the other side of 'tip'? It sounds kind of informal to me and I'm ...
0
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1answer
39 views

Using adjective as adverb

I've heard a line in a song contained "...I slept peaceful on your shoulder...". Is this correct from a native speaker point of view? Is peaceful here an adverb without a -ly form, or does it relate ...
1
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1answer
49 views

Is this sentence correct? - “Every one of them could not solve it.”

Thank you for checking out my question. Even though I asked a similar question earlier, another confounding issue showed up here. Is this sentence grammatically correct or, at least, acceptable? ...
0
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1answer
57 views

Would Limnlight make sense instead of limelight? [closed]

I am familiar with the term limn: limn /lim/Submit verbLITERARY past tense: limned; past participle: limned depict or describe in painting or words. suffuse or highlight (something) with ...
15
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5answers
3k views

What do you call the land area around a pond?

Usually "shore" and "beach" are used when talking about a large body of water. But what if we talk about a pond? Is the area around it still called a beach/shore?
0
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0answers
18 views

Verbs followed by a description \ 2 Verbs in a row [duplicate]

I have a question regarding the usage of Verb-ing and V1 when we have 2 verbs in a row, or a verb with a description. For example: "My mom doesn't let me bring a cat home." "Let's go eat." "I ...
1
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1answer
44 views

What do the bold numerals in parentheses mean in Merriam Webster Dictionary? [closed]

Here is the specific word I am referring to: The bold numerals in parentheses are under the 2nd definition. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/just Are those sub-sub senses? Or are they ...
0
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1answer
32 views

Bring or get? Which sentence is better? [closed]

I left my bag in my friend's room. How do I ask for it Can you bring it tommorow ? OR Can you get it tomorrow?
11
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6answers
2k views

Use of the word “wrong” in causal learning exercises

I am an "event learning" consultant and practitioner and have been since 1974. When something goes "wrong" -- an injury, explosion, loss of revenue, etc. high hazard industries are required to ...
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2answers
56 views

Is there a word that can mean “education” and “formation” depending on context? [closed]

There is a Russian word образование that can mean education and formation depending on context. It will be great if there a word in English that also can have two of those meanings. Not necessarily ...
2
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3answers
88 views

Why is there not a secondary definition for “bolt hole” that includes holes for bolts?

When I look up the definition for "bolt hole" on Google or in most dictionaries, I am surprised to find that the definition does not include something similar to "a hole for bolts". The current given ...
1
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1answer
28 views

What to call a library of shared libraries in programming

There are (for example) three dynamic libraries that is files libxx.so, libyy.so, and libzz.so (or .dll files xx.dll, yy.dll, and zz.dll on Windows). What do you call the collection of all three ...
1
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1answer
25 views

“Which” with an independent clause

I've seen the classic "that" vs "which" debate. However, I'm unsure about which to use in the case of joining a clause with "and". For instance, in Proper Confidence: Faith, Doubt, and Certainty in ...
2
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1answer
41 views

Use of climate and its derivatives as adjectivized forms with another noun

I am working on the area of Ecology and the word climate and its derivatives show up in almost every writing. Climate/climatic/climatology/climatological My question is, what is the correct word to ...
0
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1answer
47 views

What is the video saying at 6:10, was it “write off” or “ride off”? [closed]

The Video starts automatically at 5 mintues 32 seconds (for a bit of context) The word is mentiond around 6:08. He says: "...plus you've got a sheet of metal down there to protect it on the side to ...
1
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2answers
71 views

When should I be using sans, anyway?

People often use sans, the French word for ‘without’ in English. What I don’t get, is when should that switch be made. When should I say sans when I really want to say without. Are there any general ...
2
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0answers
26 views

Meaning of Update

Do you think "update" means the person puts the new information over the existing one, so that the previous history can't be seen? I heard someone said "update" meant we cannot see the previous ...
2
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3answers
434 views

Are 'belie' and 'hide' interchangable? [closed]

Her energetic activities in the function belied her old age. He could not belie his identity with all the makeover. Is the usage of belie correct?
3
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3answers
57 views

Usage of word “Former”

Is it fine to use the word "former" when pertaining to an object? Example: John's former laptop.
1
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1answer
70 views

What is the word to describe the relationship between two presidents not immediately before/after one another?

Donald Trump is Barack Obama's successor as the 45th and current President of the United States. But what about Trump and Bill Clinton, for example? Can we say Trump is Clinton's successor too?
1
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1answer
28 views

Can I use the word “foreshadow” in this case?

"The novel, written in 1913, foreshadows the atrocities of the First World War." According to dictionaries, "to foreshadow" means "to predict something or to give a hint of what is to come." But I ...
1
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1answer
204 views

I am fine, or I am well, or I am good? [closed]

In grade school, eons ago, I was taught to say "I am fine." Today, most people say, "I am good." Recently, I received scorn for an old man saying, "I am fine," as it was argued that "fine" would ...
0
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1answer
22 views

Clarity on the definition of the word “predict” [closed]

When someone says "I look forward to your predictable path" and "please continue down your very tired and predictable path" and "your arguments are right out of a playbook", what's the meaning of '...
5
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2answers
63 views

What does “I’m a lip speaker rather than lip reader” mean?

There was a heated argument going on in the British House of Common over the question whether the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn really uttered the word “stupid woman” at Prime Minister, Theresa May ...
0
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1answer
33 views

Describing an object as having steampunk design elements

Consider this sentence from my novel: The steampunk-esque device was a gift. The Google n-gram viewer shows no results for either "steampunkesque" or "steampunk-esque." However, when searching the ...
0
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1answer
30 views

Is “with” optional after “conferring”?

Consider the sentence: I answered the question as a novice, without conferring with Sir Thomas More or Sir Francis Bacon. Is the with optional? Could the sentence also be written as: I ...
1
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0answers
35 views

What is the difference between 'Corporate' and 'Corporation'?

I've done an extensive search but didn't find anything on that. Is 'Corporate' (as a noun) simply a shorter form of 'Corporation'? Also, if a condition dictates that 'a company name can't include ...
2
votes
2answers
30 views

Fearless and priceless

In' Fearless, painless and harmless"less" means "without" and in' priceless' it means too precious to be priced,the opposite of 'worthless'. Can we express the idea "without price" other than the way '...
3
votes
4answers
227 views

Being a persistent or persevering learner?

If someone is studying something for a longer period, concentrated, focused: is he rather a "persistent learner" (which yields more hits at google) or a "persevering learner" (which seem to be used ...
0
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0answers
16 views

“Inspite of and despite” Am I using it correctly? [duplicate]

This is my first question here so I have a doubt regarding some the usage of some words in English although it's my 3rd Language. So are the following sentences correct? Using "Inspite Of" _ Inspite ...
0
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3answers
57 views

Better way to say “ensuring high attendance?”

Is there a better way to say "ensure high attendance?" I thought about "ensure excellent attendance," but that didn't sound right either. The essay I'm writing isn't very formal, and the latter doesn'...
0
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0answers
5 views

Can I use “believe to be” [duplicate]

I was wondering if I could use "believe..." to be in this sentence. To me it sounds a bit overblown, but as I am not a native speaker, I was wondering if you would have any feedback on it: More ...
0
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1answer
25 views

Is it correct and formal to use “ones” in this sentence..?

Ions follow Hofmeister series and “salting out” effect is more significant of anions than cations and multivalent salts than monovalent ones. Thank you for your opinion and help. :)
1
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0answers
30 views

Is the term “carriage return” outdated in a (near) post-typewriter world?

When we say "Return key" or "Enter key", either are clear in meaning to those with even very light keyboarding experience. But "Return" is a diminutive of "Carriage Return". Fully saying/writing "...
0
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1answer
139 views

How do you say “headbutt” in American English?

Headbutt is a British term, how do you say the same thing in American English? I am interested in both the verb and the noun.
2
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2answers
112 views

Is the word gothic wrong/arbitrary in “Raygun Gothic”

According to wikipedia, Raygun Gothic is a catchall phrase for mid-20th Century futurist design. I don't use this term because it doesn't seem accurate in the context of art movements. Personally, I ...
0
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1answer
50 views

Can “ap­pre­ci­ate” be used in this way?

(I am not a na­tive speaker.) I just got an email re­gard­ing a failed or­der that used the fol­low­ing sen­tence: I ap­pre­ci­ate that this will not be what you wanted to hear and for that I apol­...
0
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1answer
30 views

Is “…taken to be scholarly authority” missing a preposition or an article?

The sentence is from Harold Bloom's book Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human. This chronology, necessarily tentative, partly follows what is generally taken to be scholarly authority. I find ...
2
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1answer
46 views

“assigned randomly” or “randomly assigned”?

I am creating a simulation that has 10 units and each unit gets either a squid, a fish, or a person. Here is my example sentence: "A squid, a fish, or a person is randomly assigned to each unit." ...
1
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0answers
32 views

Wistful or Wishful? [closed]

Is there a difference between 'wistful' and 'wishful'? And if so, in what context would you be able to use them?
1
vote
1answer
96 views

What should I conclude from this - A gay man

I fell in love with this course, from an American university, and wanted to enroll in it. But, when I went to the professor's page, to request him to let me in, I saw this - I am a gay man and use ...
1
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2answers
53 views

What is the difference in the usage and meaning of ‘prohibit’ and ‘bar’? [closed]

Is there any difference between ‘prohibit’ and ‘bar’ when the two words are used to express the meaning ‘to stop officially from doing sth’?
0
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1answer
80 views

Can “fluvial” be applied to man-made flooding?

I was taught in my first year geology class that fluvial meant meant "relating to water", but OED defines it as such: Geology: Of or found in a river. Could I use "fluvial" to describe water ...
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1answer
47 views

Use of probably

I know that I will probably go back to my house soon anyway so I don't want to fully decorate. Does it mean... I know that I will probably go back to my house soon anyway so probably I don't want ...
1
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2answers
60 views

Rhetorical question

There has been a question on rhetorical questions before, but the question and answers don't reflect the situation that I have. Someone sent me the following email: https://sites.google.com/site/...
0
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1answer
126 views

“Hello, welcome in” as opposed to “Welcome”

In the past year, I have noticed an interesting trend with some of the stores that I have shopped at with my fiance; when you first walk into the store, an employee will be at the door greeting ...
0
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2answers
36 views

Is there any word for a situation when a person can't feel satisfaction to let others do his work unless he does it himself? [closed]

I pondered about the words "satisfactory problems" but that is more related to men sexual problems and is diametrically opposed to what I want to know.
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2answers
55 views

How to say “get performed” in another way? [closed]

"The mechanism of warehouses can be further improved if the workload of employees is lightened by certain tasks getting performed autonomously." This is the sentence I want to use, however, the ...
2
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2answers
113 views

Used Postal Stamps and a Process of Stamping Them

Below is a postal stamp with the... postal stamp on it. It might sound weird, but a postal stamp on a postal stamp are the only terms coming to my mind when I refer to a used (redeemed?) postal stamp....