Questions tagged [word-order]

This tag is for questions about the correct order of words in a phrase, or a sentence.

74 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
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50 views

"lift/raise all up to" or "lift/raise up all to"

I know the rule with phrasal verbs and pronouns is that If the object is a personal pronoun (me, you, him, us, etc.), we always put the pronoun before the particle: Oh, I can’t lift you up any more. ...
3
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0answers
14k views

"Thus" at the beginning of the sentence or between subject and verb

"Thus" can be used both at the very beginning of the sentence, or between the subject and the verb: At high altitude, the boiling point of water is lower than at sea-level. Thus, pasta ...
3
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2answers
46 views

Placement of “anymore” with respect to other complements, as in "not possible anymore to …"

I often see sentences like this from non-native speakers: ?It is not possible anymore to cross the border without a passport. To me, this sounds wrong, and I would write this instead: It is no ...
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0answers
54 views

"Almost for nothing"?

My teacher said that there's no way to say "almost for nothing" (I wrote this in my essay), but I'm sure that I've heard this exact word order. Which is correct: "Almost for nothing&...
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0answers
48 views

Is there any fixed rule as to when we should use the structure "the + noun + of + name" instead of "name + noun"?

Is it "the jungle of Amazon" or "the Amazon jungle"? "the university of Oxford" or "the Oxford university"? Sometimes both structures seem fine (to me) (e.g. I'...
2
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1answer
123 views

Use of ... all are?

Is the all in "John, Bob, and Sue all are hungry" redundant? Does it mean anything beyond "John, Bob, and Sue are hungry"?
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0answers
167 views

Introductory Clause and Subject Agreement

I am unsure whether the following sentence reads correctly with the given introductory clause. "In addition to embodying my interests, I am confident that this program will provide me with extensive ...
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0answers
1k views

Grammar, relative clauses, possession

I have a question about relative clauses and possession, the answer to which I can find nowhere and I was hoping you could help me with that. We can say: This is the book whose title I had ...
2
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1answer
251 views

"...the pleasure enjoyed" – placement of adjective?

A person should not think that happiness is the total pleasure enjoyed. In this sentence, "enjoyed" comes after the subject it describes, even though it is not a phrase or clause. I thought only the ...
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0answers
35 views

Word order in declarative statements

In these examples, why does the first sentence feel uncomfortable, compared to the second? It's fascinating to use this camera to see how will be the back of my garden. It's fascinating to use this ...
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1answer
67 views

"would we not" vs. "wouldn't we" in questions

Is there a difference between the following two sentences? Is the second sentence grammatically wrong? Why would we not expect the body to revolt? Why wouldn't we expect the body to revolt? Is it ...
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0answers
102 views

Does "also" in a simple interrogative sentence affect the subject or the verb?

"Should I also join the team?" Here does "also" affect "I " (the subject) or "join" (the verb)? Does it mean A) Other people are joining the team and you're ...
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0answers
403 views

How to refer to historical data from latest to oldest?

Consider I have a a list of 5 exercises I did, sorted from most recent to oldest. Exercise 1 Exercise 2 Exercise 3 Exercise 4 Exercise 5 So the last exercise I did is Exercise 1. My question is how ...
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0answers
127 views

Position of “in accordance with” in negative sentence affect meaning of the sentence

I find that the position of “in accordance with + noun” in a negative sentence affects the meaning of the whole sentence. For example: Our company did not supply goods to country yy in accordance ...
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0answers
26 views

Positioning two instances of "it" in a question, is one option more likely to be confusing, ambiguous, or mis-understood than the other?

I'm torn how to position the two instances of "it" in this question. I believe that both sentences are acceptable and convey the same meaning, but I'm not sure which is more likely to be ...
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0answers
80 views

Indirect/Direct speech, Is/was: Another thing I wanted to ask is to whom I should submit

I am completely at a loss here. I know it's the basics, but do I say: Another thing I wanted to ask is to whom I should submit the paper or Another thing I wanted to ask is to whom should I ...
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0answers
32 views

Word order of sentences with "included"

For the participle "included", there are two options that both sound similar to me. However, one option might be preferred above the other. It might also be that there is an underlying grammatical ...
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0answers
203 views

Position of 'both' or 'equally' in regard to prepositions (to both reassure OR both to reassure)

1) This helps both to reassure existing users and (to) attract new users. 2) This helps to both reassure existing users and (to) attract new users. I'm pretty sure the second one is a correct ...
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0answers
55 views

How many "of" is allowed? How to reposition nouns correctly?

Facing this, I am not sure that I know the right answer. At the university, I was taught that only 2 prepositions "of" are allowed to be sounding natural. If it comes to translation from Russian into ...
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0answers
1k views

Proper Usage of Nicknames?

I’m already aware that nicknames are usually incorporated into the larger name between the first and last names — John “Jack” Doe, for example — and that this is essentially standard usage. When you ...
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0answers
1k views

Why is 'What need have you' used here?

I read the sentence below. If I can verbalize my anxiety, what need have you to focus on my body language, smells, or other physical or psychological signs that might accompany these feelings? I get ...
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0answers
96 views

Word Order and Comparative

Consider the different locations of the subject, adjective, and conjunction in the following sentences. A boy as trim as Bob should be a fast runner. As trim a boy as Bob should be a fast runner. ...
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0answers
99 views

A Question on Adjective Order (Probable Exception?)

Most sources on adjective order (e.g. EF) mention that when ordering adjectives, Size comes before Shape. Example: The small round table NOT *The round small table However, what about the ...
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418 views

Do complex sentences omit verbs in dependent clauses?

1.An event came before another event. 2.The earlier event did not happen before the later one. 3.Something had happened before something else. 4.It had not come before the subject. 5.One event ...
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893 views

"We next consider" vs "We consider next"

In a technical scientific paper, should I write "We next consider an example of ..." or "We consider next an example of ..." or "Next we consider an example of ..."
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1answer
121 views

Inversion verb-subject after an appositive phrase

I can't find a written rule about the subject-verb inversion in appositive phrases. In the temple, is a statue. In the temple, a statue is. I feel that the first one is more natural, but, as said, ...
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1answer
42 views

Correct location for title Director?

Correct usage of department director? Example: Director of Human Resources Human Resources Director
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1answer
251 views

order or adjuncts and adjectives

The more thought I give about the order of adjuncts and adjectives before a noun, the less sense it all makes. Not a native speaker, but using English on a daily basis. For instance, in "Relational ...
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0answers
28 views

Word order with interchange

Which sentence is grammatically correct when A and B are some states: “The A-B gap can be controlled or states can even be interchanged depending on temperature” or “The gap can be controlled or even ...
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0answers
34 views

Word order of locations

Is there a rule in the English language that governs the order of location specificity? Once my English lecturer stated that in English locations are written from the smallest level up to the highest. ...
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0answers
63 views

What is the correct adjective order for "unique" and "only"?

Which category of adjectives would "unique" and "only" (as in "only child") fall under? I'm asking with regards to where it would fit in terms of the adjective order on ...
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0answers
30 views

Different meaning of "Only"' in different positions in a sentence

What is the difference in meaning between "A form with only the two quotations is submitted." and "A form with the only two quotations is submitted." ?
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0answers
28 views

Verb followed by relative clause

The boy who ate fruit came. The boy came who ate fruit. Here both sentences have relative clause "who ate fruit" and a principal clause "the boy came". Here is my question: Both ...
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0answers
14 views

Differences in word order?

The independent clause, “He is carrying a heavy load”, might be connected with a dependent clause of varying order: most of which is to be consumed. which most of, is to be consumed. of which, most ...
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0answers
64 views

Can "but also" be split in "not only ... but also"?

I think I generally agree with the statement When using not only . . . but also in a sentence, parallelism should be the goal. It means that the words following both parts of this correlative ...
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0answers
26 views

Position of Preposition phrases

Do all the following three sentences mean the same? Where should I put the preposition phrase. 1- In India, people love to eat mangoes. 2- People in India love to eat mangoes. 3- People love to eat ...
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0answers
11 views

Separated (nonrestrictive) relative clauses

This question concerns relative clauses describing the subject noun phrase but separated from it by the predicate. I first took notice of this phenomenon with Javert's Suicide song in Les Misérables: ...
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0answers
32 views

"the idea started simple" vs "the idea started simply"

What is the difference in meaning between the two phrases in the title, and are both gamatically correct? My impression is the following: "The idea started simple" = In the beginning the ...
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0answers
74 views

Adjective placed before a noun but adjectival complement after it

Page 14 of Practical English Usage reads In some cases an adjective can be put before a noun and its complement after it. This happens with different, similar, the same, next, last, first, second etc;...
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24 views

We've all met up vs. We all have met up

Which word order should I use in an informal letter? It’s been a while since we all have met up or It's been a while since we've all met up
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0answers
30 views

Where do I place the adverb "massively"?

Which of the two sentences sounds better to you? I'm thinking "massively" should go AFTER the verb seeing that it is an adverb of manner (as per Cambridge English Dictionary) The number of ...
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0answers
22 views

Where the sentence begins, “The portion of the Deposit, if any,” does “if any” apply to portion or Deposit? Emphasis in original

Where the sentence follows an election to chose between the deposit or another mutually independent remedy, does the wording “if any” in “The portion of the Deposit, if any, . . .” apply to portion ...
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0answers
35 views

Position of 'was'

I know this is correct: I don't know what the problem that he was trying to solve was. But is this? I don't know what the problem was that he was trying to solve. I think the latter is incorrect. ...
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0answers
45 views

Color and inverted sentence?

One of my colleagues asked me the other day why can we say both the following? Red is my favorite color. My favorite color is red. Yet, we cannot say Red is his house. when his house is red. What ...
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0answers
23 views

Is this sentence correct? ( adj+noun order)

"...possibly generated by the damages intensification of the hexagonal lattice caused by the repeated impact of the steel balls during the milling process." First of all, from my point of view, damage ...
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0answers
41 views

"Ever" placement in between a particle and a preposition

A line in At Middleton goes: Did you read up ever on this bell tower? This sentence has "ever" inserted inside a particle-prepositional verb, before the preposition and after the particle. ...
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768 views

Which one is correct, As you mentioned or the other?

In email, I need to respond with the meaning of 'I have made the changes as you mentioned in the below email'. I am not sure which one is grammatically correct. Can someone please help on this. As ...
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0answers
60 views

"Customers of product X" or "Product X customers"?

Does the word order here change the meaning (even slightly)? Is one version less clear than the other? I conducted interviews with customers of product X and product Y. I conducted interviews with ...
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0answers
35 views

What is the word order in the founding documents of American history?

Apparently, the historical document passages in SAT tests have some sort of twisted word order. I wonder if there is a proper text on the grammatical word order rules for such documents. P.S. I ...
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51 views

Uncommon subjunctive inversion in a negative clause in the pluperfect: "had not millions been swept away"

Voters in 2008 would have seen he didn’t measure up then, had not millions been swept away with emotion and wish-fulfillment. (source) This line reads odd even jarring to me with a weird inversion ...