Questions tagged [word-choice]

This tag is for questions about choosing the best word FROM A GIVEN SELECTION for a particular context or meaning. The selection to choose from must appear in the question. If you do not know the word already, use single-word-requests.

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1answer
42 views

Does “chronological order” mean the most recent item comes first?

I want to say that a list is in chronological order. Does this implies that the most recent event comes first? Or do I have to mention that explicitly? This the list of papers in chronological ...
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1answer
37 views

AGO for physical distance?

I have come up with this sentence "I crossed the border 3 kilometers ago". I feel like ago is not the correct adverb since it's used in time contexts. Can you help me find the correct adverb? Thank ...
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0answers
19 views

“As a whole” synonym

I want another way to say "as a whole" or "as a group" in the example below: "However, even though it can distinguish between file-backed and anonymous pages in usage accounting, it is unable to ...
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0answers
24 views

Can 'issuee' be used as 'employee' is used in respect to 'employer'?

I wonder if issuee is a word that can be used to indicate the other party, opposed to the issuer, in for example, a digital certificate issuing process? Like The issuer of the certificate is ...
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0answers
30 views

Is it right to say “ taste on top” to mean good taste for something? [closed]

We would like to use a sentence for good taste product. Can we say " taste on top"?.
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2answers
50 views

Can the word “deepen” be replaced by another word in the article title? [closed]

When glimpsing the title "Is Russia eyeing Belarus takeover? Integration talks deepen", I think the word "deepen" is ambiguous and guess it means "worsen". Perhaps the reporter uses a confusing word ...
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1answer
41 views

To stab in a downwards motion [closed]

I was wondering what the word was for “to stab in a downwards motion”. As in shanking downwards?
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5answers
2k views

A word like ethereal that also means quickly vanishing [duplicate]

This is a question for English wordsmiths. Is there a word that "feels" like the word "ethereal" that means something ethereal that quickly disappears. Or is "ethereal" the correct word choice for ...
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1answer
10 views

Use of 'variation in' versus 'variation of'

Are there rules for preferring the use of 'variation of' versus 'variation in'? For example, in a sentence 'We found variation in the properties of the nerve cells' versus 'We found variation of the ...
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0answers
26 views

word choice: generated or conjured up

Last Friday night, John heard me laughing from the living room when he was in his bedroom upstairs. The next day, when he asked me what was so funny, I said, "The TV talk show generated / conjured up ...
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1answer
58 views

Another way to say “before” or “in advance”

I am writing a (computer science) paper and want to express the sentence "A acquires the lock before B acquires it." in a more complex way. Can I say: "A acquires the lock antecedent to B." or can ...
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0answers
25 views

Is this grammatically correct? [closed]

Is this grammatically correct, "I am currently working on the schedule, once I'm done with it I will provide you with it."? Thanks
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0answers
31 views

Could reside be used in the sense of a user having an account on a website?

When a user creates (for example) a blog on a website, I am wondering about if a user (not the person behind the user) could be said "to reside" on the link of the Web page. For example, if a blog is ...
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2answers
83 views

How can I replace the most popular cuss words with words which don't sound overly deliberately euphemistic and outright childish? [closed]

It's not that I curse a lot, even when I'm angry, but I don't particularly like the origin of certain, particularly the most popular English ones, cuss words, so I am trying to stop using them ...
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0answers
18 views

animate their serious faces/expressions/look

I've made up three versions of the example below. (1) Some of the people I know always seem emotionless. However, my funny gestures can animate their serious faces. (2) Some of the people I know ...
1
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1answer
37 views

enjoy it [as much as possible] or [to the utmost] or [immensely] [closed]

Suppose that John has prepared some food for you. You're now eating it. He asks you, "Why are you eating so slowly? Which of the following three replies is best? (1) "Because I want to enjoy it to ...
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0answers
38 views

Is “ nocturnal crime” a correct collocation?

I am a non-native English speaker. Based on its meaning by dictionaries, nocturnal can go with "crime". But I haven't seen it used in any sentences. Can I use this collocation?
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2answers
98 views

Difficult vs difficulty

Do we say: One of the symptoms may be "difficult breathing" or "difficulty breathing"? Can the word difficulty be used as a modifier? Thanks for help. Jakub
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0answers
33 views

synonyms of “project”, “assignment”, “task” from end-user point of view

I'm compiling a FAQ section and for the last 20 minutes, I can't decide which of the following sentences fits or maybe none of them fits. Example sentences: How long does it take to complete ...
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2answers
72 views

Looking for a word attributing the state of revealing the past

Words like "prophetic" and "visionary" explain situations in which someone or something can predict the future. Nonetheless, I am looking for a word that embodies the ability to reveal information ...
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0answers
37 views

Do we say “to lean the broom AGAINST / ON the corner of the room” or “to lean the broom IN the corner of the room”? [migrated]

lean [transitive] to make something rest against something in a sloping position lean something against something Can I lean my bike against the wall? She leaned her head against his ...
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0answers
26 views

Which word is the closest in meaning to “counterpart” in the given context?

The word "counterparts" in the following sentence is the closest in meaning to … A) relatives B) clients C) competitors D) equivalents Public managers encounter many more constraints ...
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1answer
59 views

Is “out of … reasons” as fine as because of, due to, for?

Examples Take sentences like: Because of her alcohol addiction, she spends an extra $20 on booze every day. Due to her alcohol addiction, she spends an extra $20 on booze every day. If ...
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0answers
12 views

Do not express a sentence properly due to lack of vocabulary [duplicate]

I am searching for a specific phrase. Sample Sentence I am an avid reader so I go to our local library at least three times a week where I meet some other reader. Now here I cannot express the ...
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0answers
11 views

Compliance “to be mandatory” [migrated]

I want to ask a question about the function of the word "compliance". I was writing a text regarding politics and wanted to mention whether if the United Kingdom left the EU whether some of the ...
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1answer
43 views

Does one “study” a perspective?

Can a perspective be "studied"? And, what other verbs (e.g., understand, read, learn, etc.) can be associated with "perspective" on matters relating to knowledge?
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0answers
30 views

“First Recruit” or “First Recruitment”?

If I'm trying to say I was a member of an organization its very first year would it be better to say: I was part of the first recruit of the commission? OR I was part of the first recruitment of ...
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0answers
19 views

Indirect association to specific people

If you're watching the news, you often hear commentators ask a question to a guest about two specific people, but refer to them as entities of some sort. For instance; Instead of asking, "How would ...
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0answers
26 views

Should I end with “Yours sincerely” or “Yours faithfully” when writing to editor? [duplicate]

I've read from other questions here that we should use "Yours sincerely" when we know the name of the recipient and "Yours faithfully" if we're writing to "Sir/Madam". Then what about "Dear Editor" ...
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0answers
31 views

Help on OI word [migrated]

Need help in my kids’s assignment in fill in the blank with oi word related to the pic. Please help me.
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1answer
70 views

Multiple clauses without the fanboys rule

The examples below show unique clauses which are commonly found in academic papers and bullet points. Example sentence: The factory produced a foul smell in the air, angering numerous residents in ...
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0answers
52 views

What is the difference between 'verdant' and 'verdure'? [closed]

What is the difference between verdant and verdure? If there any difference between these words? And if possible could you be so kind to show some the list of examples?
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0answers
17 views

Using the word ‘accomplished’ to summarize skills

Is the example below an appropriate usage of the word ‘accomplished’ in a bullet point? Example: “Accomplished a wide range of complex assignments, which is proven by measurable outcomes” The above ...
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3answers
76 views

What would be the non-medical equivalent to the word “contraindications”?

I am looking for a word that comparatively has the same meaning, except not specific to a medical context (confirmed through Merriam-Webster the word is specific to medical context). An example for ...
1
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0answers
20 views

“Be allowed” vs “is allowed” [duplicate]

Which of the following is grammatically correct? It is important that the bandwidth, which controls the function, be allowed to vary... or It is important that the bandwidth, which controls the ...
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0answers
34 views

Can “everlasting”/“eternal” be used as independent adjective?

I am about to translate a phrase into English, with the meaning of "something that lasts forever", but it's in adjective form. I've searched that there are two adjectives: everlasting and eternal. In ...
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2answers
108 views

What's a word for someone who goes past their limits?

My friend and I have been struggling to find one word for this trait! Essentially it's someone who goes past their limits, thus experiencing intense burnout and potential consequences afterwards. ...
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1answer
59 views

To reach my aims vs To achieve my aims

I'm doing an exercise from an ESL book where I need to choose the correct collocation. Here's the bit I'm confused about: Since I decided to become an architect, I've put a lot of effort into ...
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0answers
29 views

Describing 'fit' and 'suit' [migrated]

Is it grammatically correct to say: 'This coat fits me very much' and 'This coat suits me very much' ? I know the difference between 'fit' and 'suit', I'm only interested in using 'very much' ...
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1answer
61 views

GRE Text Completion: Why is it supposed to be “supplies” not “prices” in this problem?

Could you please help me solve the following question? The trade in scientific literature in nineteenth-century Germany was so robust that the publisher constantly worried about (i) ________ ...
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0answers
46 views

agreat vs. a great vs. greater [migrated]

Here is a quotation from the movie Great Expectations Part 2 (1999; Director: Julian Jarrold) If the danger would be 50 times agreat I should still have come to you. The meaning is clearly "...
1
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1answer
63 views

“below” vs. “under”

I have read through questions about how "below", "under", "beneath", and "underneath" generally compare (both in stackexchange, and outside), but I don't feel that they gave a satisfactory answer for ...
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3answers
101 views

word to describe an irritatingly overhelpful person [duplicate]

My mother-in-law is the type of person that compulsively OFFERS. It’s past good manners and etiquette and bordering on harassment. And it’s thoughtless but not really. Offering a diabetic pie and ice ...
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1answer
57 views

Does the word “inebriate” work for marijuana usage?

I've found conflicting answers online. Does the word "inebriate" only apply to the effects of alcohol or also to the effects of cannabis, or any other intoxicant?
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2answers
66 views

Cogs, wheels, cogwheels, cog wheels, sprockets, etc.?

As a non-native English speaker, one of the most recurring confusions I've had, and which I can't seem to ever get straight, is how to refer to those mechanical "thingies" you often see in old ...
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0answers
27 views

Professional supplant for “Making an Inquiry”

Imagine you have a piece of paper by which you can pay a bill. First, you have to check how much credit it has inside. What is the proper word that describes the process of "asking an official about ...
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1answer
34 views

“hand off”, “hand over” and “take over”

In the context of customer support, when a team owns a ticket and it finds out the correct owner should be another team, they "hand the ticket off" and the new team "takes it ower". Why handoff and ...
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1answer
38 views

Which you have ever seen

So there's an article about the Cybertruck that starts out like this: "The Cybertruck is already here and it doesn't look like any pickup truck that you've ever seen." My (Russian native) friend ...
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0answers
34 views

Using “which” in this sentence

An immovable property may be subjected to a servitude by virtue of which the owner of such property is bound. I would like to know how “which” is being used in this sentence and what it refers to. ...
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0answers
36 views

A more specific word for, “personal details,” i.e. identifying information for a person

I think, "biographical information," gets used often, but that isn't quite correct. "Personal information," also seems clumsy. The context is somewhat technical, e.g. "this user's ________ ...

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