Questions tagged [vowel-length]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
2answers
88 views

Pronunciation: vowels before dark L (Any accent)

To native speakers of English, how do you compare a vowel before a dark L and one without a dark L. Example words: gold, goal, sold, soul, hole, hold, bowl, bold go, so, ho, bow(noun) . ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

Pronunciation vs Spelling of Done [closed]

Why is 'Done' pronounced with a short ŏ vowel sound instead of the long ō vowel sound? Rules typically dictate when a word ends with an E, it changes the O to a long vowel sound. I've tried to find ...
1
vote
2answers
79 views

What is the vowel length of rhotic schwa /ɚ/ when it occurs non-word finally?

I know that /ɚ/ is longest when it occurs at the end of a word, since it is occurring at the end of an open syllable, as in < rapture> [ræp̚tʃɚː]. What about when it occurs syllable finally in the ...
-1
votes
0answers
302 views

Vowel length in American English

I could find many resources online about vowel length in English and in American English, but I got to say that although they're interesting, no one directly answers the question "what the length of ...
3
votes
1answer
152 views

What's the history of the English letter “Y” as a “sometimes vowel”?

Wondering when and why historically the Anglo-Saxon letter "Y" became a (part-time) vowel substitute for the letter "I", leading to "gymnasium" instead of "gimnasium" or "cyanide" instead of "cianide" ...
6
votes
1answer
686 views

Why is “salient” pronounced with a “long a” sound?

The word salient is pronounced with a "long a" sound; Wiktionary gives the US pronunciation as /ˈseɪ.ljənt/, /ˈseɪ.li.ənt/. Is there any reason why the vowel letter here receives its "long" ...
2
votes
2answers
556 views

The short 'i' in the word “believe”?

What is this merger called? I know there's the nearer-mirror merger, where both words are pronounced with the exact same long i, but which merger is responsible for the pronunciation of the short i in ...
-1
votes
2answers
1k views

Which words have a long vowel before the suffix -ic?

In many cases in English, vowels followed by a single consonant are pronounced short (also called lax) when followed by the suffix -ic or -ical, even if they are long in other related words. Some ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

When did “legend” stop being pronounced “LEE-gend”?

Nowadays, we pronounce the word legend as "LEDGE-end" (IPA: /ˈlɛdʒənd/). But it looks like at least some people used to pronounce "legend" as "LEE-gend." In A General Dictionary of the English ...
4
votes
4answers
6k views

What's the correct way to write drawn-out vowels?

How should I denote drawn-out vowels in English? If I have a character with speech disorder or with a very unique accent, what is the correct way to express, in written form, this quirk of their ...
3
votes
2answers
549 views

Do we need to put extra sound W or J in front of L in the case of /ei+L/ or /ee+L/ or /ai+L/ or /oo+L/ or /oi+L/ in American English?

Ok, let see the sale /seɪl/, that is from IPA but when speak American English, do we have to put /seɪ-jl/ (sound like sei jo) Similarly, feel /fiːl/ will become /fiː jl/ or mile /maɪl/ will become /...
0
votes
4answers
583 views

Is this usage of “Just as well” correct?

Is it okay to use "just as well" in the next scenario: Person 1: When I'm mad I can be stubborn as hell. Person 2: And when you're not, just as well!
5
votes
3answers
5k views

/i/ sound before “ng” and “nk”

I'm a substitute teacher and recently was teaching a kindergarten class about long i sound. They were crossing out words without long i, circling words with long i. One of the words was ink. I told ...
17
votes
2answers
2k views

What did we gain in return for the loss of phonemic vowel length from Old English?

In Old English, vowel length was phonemic, but stress and certain kinds of consonant voicing were not. In Modern English, that situation is reversed: vowel length is no longer phonemic, but stress ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Long vs. short vowels in English words of Latin origin

Is there any way to determine if a vowel is short or long in English words of Latin origin? I've noticed that u is usually long in Latin words (e.g., Jupiter) but what about other vowels?
7
votes
1answer
4k views

Do “hull” and “full” rhyme?— rules for “short U” sounds before L

I grew up speaking a variety of American English that merges the "short U" sounds before L. The "short U" sounds are the vowels in the words STRUT and FOOT. For me, before an L sound, all words have ...
6
votes
5answers
119k views

How do we differentiate long vowels from short vowels in English

I was finding a school for my toddler. I saw this new theory called long vowels and short vowels The teacher talk about apple, which she read something like "eiple" and the hat, which she claims use ...