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Questions tagged [verbs]

This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

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57 views

Difference between supplemental NP and absolute clause?

What is the difference between a supplemental noun phrase and a absolute clause? In these examples and in general. Is it just the non-finite nature of the second example? Are they not serving a ...
2
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0answers
108 views

Verbs with interchanged subject and object

For some verbs we can find another (not necessarily unique) verb which has the same meaning except that it corresponds the subject and the object in the opposite direction. For example, if I say “our ...
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0answers
77 views

When did the South start using the +es third person, present tense verb inflection in Middle English?

In Middle English the Northern speakers started using the +es inflection whilst the South continued to use the Old English form +eð/+eth. When did the South finally catch up with the North and use the ...
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0answers
293 views

Are verbs “to run” as in “to run a business” and “to run” as in “to run a marathon” considered to be homonyms/homographs?

Or is there just a single verb "to run" that has different meanings and therefore it cannot be considered a homonym/homograph to itself?
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0answers
521 views

Have vs Have been

If Jim had taken Sandra to a romantic film, she wouldn't have been so frightened. If I hadn't missed the train, I wouldn't have been late. If she had known the address, she would have been able to ...
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0answers
34 views

What makes progressive verbs different from atelic, and can a verb be both atelic/telic, and/or progressive?

From what I've been reading about progressive verb forms those types of verbs are more often atelic, but I'm wondering if there are progressive forms that are exceptions to that. Or how can atelic/...
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0answers
22 views

Which one is correct? : “He is descended from Lucrezia Borgia” or “He descends from Lucrezia Borgia”

I understand that Is descended from is better than just descends from. Maybe both forms are correct, Please explain.
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0answers
36 views

Is it right to say “I've compensated that day that I didn't work”

What is the correct way to say that I've worked to cover some hours that I didn't work on a specific day of the week? Let's say that I work 8 hours every day, but on Monday I worked only 4, but on ...
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0answers
20 views

Is it correct to simplify common verbs in an ordered sentence?

Today, I came across a sentence pattern in a well-accepted technical document, as follows: Their X1 are too A1, their X2 too A2, and their X3 too A3. Is it correct to use only one are in this ...
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0answers
31 views

Is it possible to say “to refund (an amount) to an order”?

I sent a Customer a partial refund. I want to inform her using the verb to refund + a preposition. Considering my native language, I would say I've just refunded $20 to your order. According to my ...
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0answers
35 views

What verb to use with the noun “groundbreaking”?

I need some help with the noun groundbreaking. According to the American Heritage Dictionary, 4th Edition, it is The act or ceremony of breaking ground to begin a construction project. My question ...
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0answers
48 views

Is there a name for this grammatical structure where a verb is followed by a direction?

In English there are lots of phrases where a verb is followed by a direction and it takes on a whole new meaning. Examples: get up, get off, get down, take in, take out, take off, etc. This is ...
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0answers
23 views

using ''require'' or synonyms in a cover letter

I have a doubt about the correct use of the verb to require and its synonyms in a cover letter. My doubt is: require sounds almost like it's something that you are forced to do (therefore expresses a ...
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0answers
29 views

Meaning of present tense

Two questions here. 1) A (high quality and honest) citizen journalist wrote a report on JAN 30, "Yesterday Police announced they were investigating the death as a suicide. The wife of the victim is ...
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0answers
225 views

I knew I would have died/ I knew I would die

I'm writing a story and my character is referring to the knowledge she always had that she would eventually die under the rain. Of course she's not dead at the moment of saying the sentence, but she ...
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0answers
41 views

singular noun-verb agreement with superlative adjective

Is the noun-verb following sentence correct?: "Most metaphysics has been determined by it." I thought that with the superlative adjective 'most', the subject is made plural; but can it also be ...
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0answers
171 views

Difference between “transform into” and “turn into”

It's a fact (by my research) that both verbs can be used to indicate the same meaning of change, as in: The Prime Minister has the ability to transform his vision into reality. The Prime ...
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0answers
117 views

Difference between “label”, “categorize” and “arrange”

Can the verbs, like label, categorize, and arrange, be used to mean the same, as in: The states are labeled with their U.S. postal abbreviations, their founding date and capitals. The states ...
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0answers
160 views

What verbs in English never take nouns as complements, and is there a term for this?

I can think of only a few verbs like exist and belong that never take ordinary nouns as object complements. (see below) We never say things like, *She exists a doctor. Rather, we would say, She ...
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0answers
39 views

Which verb to use with noun “action”?

In technical manual how would you write: “to run the default action press the button” or to launch the default action? Or to activate? Or something else?
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0answers
40 views

What is the verb portion of a hyphenated/compound/multiword adjective or noun called?

For example, in the noun "victim-blaming", what is the "blaming" part called? Is it some special type of verb, or perhaps something else? Words of this form can generally be made up and can still be ...
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0answers
42 views

What is the relation between a verb and an adverb (officially) called?

What does an adverb "do" to a verb? When googling I found terms like modifies or describes, but I'm not sure if a name for the relation exists.
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69 views

How did *vegetate* take this meaning despite its etymology?

vegetate intransitive verb 1 : to lead a passive existence without exertion of body or mind 2 a : to grow in the manner of a plant; also : to grow exuberantly or with proliferation of ...
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0answers
36 views

Among his greatest hits (were?/was?) the anthem. Which verb is correct?

I read this article and found a sentence that says: Among his greatest hits were the anthem "Bring Him Back Home," demanding Nelson Mandela's freedom from jail. Could you explain why the sentence ...
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185 views

Grammatical structure

Mental energy is a vital element needed to be able to concentrate one's attention and maintain a positive mental attitude. The question I want to ask is how the section in bold is functioning over ...
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0answers
339 views

Is “The xxxxx displays.” bad style?

This has been bugging me for a while but throughout our company technical documents there's regular use of this type of sentence: The (user interface component) displays. Displays being the important ...
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0answers
60 views

Can I substitute a main verb with an auxiliary verb in a subordinate clause if it has an object after?

There are no auxiliary verbs in my language, so I often struggle using them in English. If I want to substitute a main verb in a subordinate clause of a complex sentence, because it's the same as in ...
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0answers
97 views

The relation between verbs and their prepositions

As we know, we use phrasal verbs in which we put prepositions(and adverbs) after verbs that affect the meaning of the action mentioned in the sentence. For instance, taking the example of the verb run(...
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0answers
117 views

Parsing a sentence with a causative verb

I am an ESL teacher trying to help a student prepare for a test that will have a lot of sentence parsing. We are both stumped by the second verb in causative sentences. For example: She asked the ...
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0answers
34 views

What is “Used” role in this sentence?

What is "Used" role in this sentence? The polymers used have for the most part been derived from ... .
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0answers
44 views

Two-word verbs described with One-word nouns

I've noticed that certain (compound?) verbs are combined into one word when the process is used as a noun. It seems to generally be processes with a preposition in them. If the noun isn't combined ...
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0answers
60 views

Past simple or past continuous usage

John met his wife when he was working in Brussels. Why is "was working" correct and not worked? My student noted that after when the past simple is used. Thank you.
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0answers
143 views

verb group, verb phrase, or what?

Is there a universally recognized term for a sequence like "take care of"? It's not a verb phrase, but it doesn't seem to be a verb group in the sense of M. A. K. Halliday's framework, either. What ...
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0answers
332 views

What's the difference between “tagging”, “labelling”, and “annotation”?

For machine learning purpose, we need to use labelled data to train a model. But what's the best verb to describe the action to "labelling" the data? I have seen people using these terms, what's the ...
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0answers
84 views

Can you switch verb tenses when beginning a new sentence?

Tony had just grabbed another bottle of whiskey when it happened. Dropping it, he reached out and grabbed the closest thing to him, narrowly avoiding falling to the ground. Like going from "grabbed" ...
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0answers
103 views

Verb consistency of tense in extended passage

I read this answer on Quora. I wanted to ask about verb consistency because the writer is jumping from past continuous to present then present continuous. How is doing that valid? I was in an Uber ...
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0answers
41 views

About “move to”

Is it correct to use "move to" in the following context? I will stay in Gozo for a few days then move to Malta island for the rest of my stay in Malta. I plan to stay in Malta only for 12 days ...
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0answers
634 views

Difference between arrange and make arrangements

Can anyone tell me the difference between arrange to/for and make arrangements to? Here is the sentence: During the discussion, we’ll make arrangements to send your $50 Amazon gift card! OR During the ...
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0answers
586 views

RULES FOR LINKING VERBS (state of being verbs)

I have an English grammar book from 1984 (let this not affect the question please), where this example is given about action verbs and linking verbs: I enjoy a cup of coffee when I arrive at work. ...
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0answers
272 views

Correct use of “consulting”

I'm really not sure how to correctly use consulting. For example: The business offers consulting for(?) programming. Their employees consult their customers for(?) programming. In sentences ...
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0answers
529 views

Future continuous “going to”

The future continuous tense is made by combining "will" with "be" + present participle, e.g. He will be speaking. The future simple can use "will" or "going to", i.e. He will speak and He is going to ...
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0answers
137 views

Using base verbs in a sentence

I've just began to read “Atlas shrugged” in English and noticed a strange structure in the third paragraph: "Why did you say that?" asked Eddie Willers, his voice tense. I'm interested in the last ...
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0answers
349 views

Practical English Usage by Swan - tense simplification in subordinate clauses - main verb terminology

in the entry 580.1 "reasons for tense simplification" in Practical English Usage by Michael Swan, he wrote: "If the main verb of a sentence makes it clear what kind of time the speaker is talking ...
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0answers
81 views

Can transitive verbs be further broken down?

Can transitive verbs be further broken down into different types of transitive verbs? For example, I think there are change of state transitive verbs and stative transitive verbs, and was wondering ...
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0answers
253 views

Can something that “will have been done” happen before the sentence is spoken?

There is a tense (can't remember its name) where in the future, something was done. The form is "< time-in-the-future >, the < noun > will have < verb >-ed". My question is this: might < ...
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0answers
108 views

Temporal value of a present tense verb in a predicate nominative statement?

Does the present tense equative verb ("is") in a predicate nominative construction necessarily have temporal value, or does it depends on the statement itself? For example, "Lebron James is the best ...
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0answers
69 views

Which form of the word should I use?

I'm putting together a report for work. The template I've been given has a blurb already written in which I just insert the proper names for their respective state, and each state gets their own ...
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0answers
565 views

Can an adverb be placed between a verb and its direct object?

The direct object usually follows the verb, not the adverb. For example, we say I love you deeply instead of I love deeply you. However, there are instances where the direct object is so long that the ...
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0answers
1k views

Variations of the same word

Here is a question for you guys. Im trying to find a good website or whatever place that can show me all forms of a specific word. For example the word "transparent" has other morphologies like "...
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0answers
2k views

Why does incentivize exist as a verb but disincentivize does not?

I ask this because incentive and disincentive both exist, but annoyingly, autocorrect and spellcheckers all over refuse to accept disincentivize while gladly accepting incentivize.