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Questions tagged [verbs]

This tag is for questions about verbs. Verbs are words that express an action, occurrence, or a state of being. Add this tag to single-word-requests if you are looking for a verb. Add the tag word-usage if you are asking about the usage of the verb.

10
votes
4answers
2k views

“Would have” in conditional clauses

I have been taught to use the if I had form in conditional clauses referring to the past: If the president had asked me, I would have told him the same thing. As far as I can tell though, the ...
6
votes
5answers
3k views

“Something that work” or “something that works”?

Googling both sentences I find many references with or without -s. Should I add the -s to the verb after "that"? Is it considered a third person singular? I'm searching for a rule to apply to the ...
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Meaning of “owedst”

...Not poppy, nor mandragora, Nor all the drowsy syrups of the world, Shall ever medicine thee to that sweet sleep Which thou owedst yesterday. — Shakespeare, Othello III.iii I really ...
22
votes
11answers
24k views

Does the verb “unpublish” exist?

I use a CMS (content management system) where a post or comment is visible to all the users (if there aren't other restrictions) when it is flagged as published. What verb should I use to mean that ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Linguistic name for verbs like 'want', 'expect', 'beg',

In linguistics, there is this certain group or class of verbs that can be used as We <VERB> you to come. Verbs like to expect and to want are in this class: We expect you to come. We want you ...
17
votes
5answers
81k views

Why is the past tense used in “I was wondering if you would like to come for dinner?”

Why isn't the present tense used? I am wondering if you would like to come for dinner.
3
votes
3answers
7k views

Why do you write “occurred” but “listened”?

The past tense of to occur is occurred (not occured), but the past tense of to listen is listened (not listenned). Why? What is the general rule that is applied to make the past tense of a verb?
2
votes
2answers
96k views

“Will discuss the matter” vs. “will discuss on this matter”

I received an email with the following sentence: The meetings will be discussing on this early next week. I have two questions: Should we use will discuss rather than will be discussing? I don't ...
3
votes
6answers
3k views

Is “facebook” as a verb different from “google” or “photoshop”?

I understand that any term, grammatical or not, becomes valid if there is common usage. I'm not concerned about that. Google and Photoshop are both commonly used as verbs. Given that the terms map ...
4
votes
4answers
41k views

“To call” vs. “to ring”

What is the difference between the verbs "call" and "ring" in the meaning of telephoning? For example: I will ring you back shortly. I will call you back shortly.
3
votes
4answers
4k views

Using 'stuck' as a verb

The visual studio kept stucking under RDP yesterday Should 'stuck' become a present tense verb? It seems like "getting stuck" is too long for the modern world where it happens much more frequently to ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

Proper Usage of gerund form of the verb [closed]

So, I want to title a talk. Which of these is the right usage and why? "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to solve them" OR "Web Development Paradigms and Djangoic approach to ...
15
votes
4answers
13k views

When is the present perfect tense used instead of the past tense?

When is the present perfect tense used instead of the past tense? I know that the present perfect tense is used when some adverbs (e.g., never, ever) are present in the sentence; the same is true ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

When can “have” be used without “got”?

I read this article and now I'm confused when got can be omitted when using have. Could this be explained in plain English without technical terms? Is there a different usage in past tense?
17
votes
4answers
4k views

How is the jussive mood rendered in English?

In English the imperative mood is used only for the second person (differently from Italian, where what is called imperative mood is used also for the first, and third person). How is the jussive mood ...
7
votes
4answers
19k views

'to check' versus 'to verify'

My interpretation is that sentences like the following have a slightly different meaning. Check the application output. Verify the application is running. Is there any difference between to ...
20
votes
8answers
55k views

Are there any differences between “I believe” vs “I think” vs “I reckon”?

These are the three most common ways to say "I think." (At least, I believe so. I mean, I think so. Um...) Are there any subtle differences between them? Are there situations where one of the three ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

Future perfect progressive

When is the future perfect progressive used? I am trying to understand in which cases it should be used, but I cannot find any practice examples of sentences using that tense. I will have been ...
15
votes
4answers
12k views

When should I use the subjunctive mood?

In which cases should I use the subjunctive mood? I suggest that every applicant fill out the form carefully. If she were rich, she would live on Long Island.
13
votes
2answers
11k views

How to combine in a sentence two verb–preposition pairs that have the same object?

Examples: Data can be imported to and exported from the application. Data can be imported and exported from the application. Data can be imported to the application and exported from it. ...
10
votes
5answers
51k views

Is there any difference between “talk to someone” and “talk with someone”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Speak to” vs. “Speak with” Well, the question is in the title. I always had the impression that "talk to someone" refers to situations when some ...
32
votes
2answers
4k views

Why are clothes “hung” but men “hanged”?

It is said that clothes can be hung but men are hanged. Is this correct, and if so, why?
28
votes
3answers
58k views

Is “prepone” being used outside India?

Prepone is a great word - it's the opposite of postpone. When you prepone a meeting, you change its scheduled time so that it occurs sooner than originally planned. Has his usage spread beyond India? ...
52
votes
10answers
9k views

Is “rather” shifting to become a verb?

In colloquial English, I constantly run across sentences of the form: I rather my [noun] [verb] A quick Google search returns tons of examples: I rather my opponents don't find out. I ...
20
votes
6answers
30k views

Is “inactivate” really a word?

At my business most of the employees use the word inactivate frequently. Is this proper grammar? I've always used deactivate.
10
votes
3answers
3k views

Why “mind” means “pay attention to”

Why the word "mind" can be used as a verb, synonym of "pay attention to"? It has the same etymology of the "mind" (centre of thought, feelings, brain) noun? When it is better to use "mind" in place of ...
5
votes
6answers
17k views

What is the difference between “’ll” and “will”?

Is there any difference in the meaning when we use 'll or will? For example, I will go to university tomorrow. I'll go to university tomorrow.
48
votes
2answers
21k views

When is “L” doubled?

Some verbs can have double Ls in the gerund form; for example: modeling; modelling traveling; travelling Which form should we use, or which form is used more in the literature?
20
votes
2answers
4k views

“did shoot” vs “shot”

This morning I read this sentence (see story): On July 24th and again on July 29th, Egyptian police did shoot dead unarmed African migrants attempting to cross that border. Why "did shoot" ...
32
votes
4answers
47k views

How does the phrase “used to” work, grammatically?

It is common to hear people say "used to" to indicate that they did something in the past but no longer do; for example, "I used to play basketball." How would "used to," used in that context, fit ...
35
votes
4answers
17k views

What is the difference between “lay” and “lie”?

How do I know when to use lay and when to use lie, and what are the different forms of each verb? I'm always getting them confused.
50
votes
8answers
35k views

Is it appropriate to use short form of “have” ('ve) when it means possession?

I feel uncomfortable saying sentences like the following: "I've a car" instead of "I have a car" "They've a great time" instead of "They have a great time" "He's a pen" instead of "He has a pen" etc ...
11
votes
5answers
5k views

What is the semantic difference between “encipher” and “encrypt”?

What is the semantic difference between encipher and encrypt?