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Questions tagged [verbing]

Questions related to using as verbs words not commonly used as such.

0
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2answers
144 views

Is there a word for making a neologism by adding an “em” prefix to nouns or adjective?

I am a trusted critic of a friend's writing. I have noticed an (admittedly obnoxious) habit they have of "creating" new words by adding the "em" prefix to nouns or adjectives, like empurpled. For ...
3
votes
2answers
268 views

Using the word “summer” as a verb with “I” as subject

As per online Dictionary summer means noun the warmest season of the year, in the northern hemisphere from June to August and in the southern hemisphere from December to February. Eg: "...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Can a noun can be used as a verb for an idiom?

Is there really an idiom called "don't playground with us" which is similar to don't mess with us? I often found slang in movie/series that a noun can be used as verb also like "Let's chair him up" or ...
-3
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2answers
70 views

Should we adopt “close shot” as a verb in casual writing? [closed]

This question inevitably invites the controversial subject of verbification, but I wish a finer discussion on its possible benefits and drawbacks. My limited vocabulary perhaps has not alerted me to a ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

What does the verb “architect” mean? [duplicate]

Here is a quote: "x Consulting Group provides senior consultants to evaluate, architect and design stable and effective solutions and networks". What more is it that the consultants are doing that is ...
0
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2answers
200 views

What is the name of the grammar used in “he returned home drunk” and “they came into the room thinking…”?

There is a problem that I have with these sentences. He returned home drunk. and Many of the candidates came into the room thinking they were just going to be talking about access to ...
3
votes
1answer
399 views

Can “adulting” be considered a verb, or is it only ever a noun?

I know the word has exploded in popularity in recent times, but I'm not sure how to use it right. This TIME article considers the word a verb, so does this M-W blog. However, the ODO entry only ...
3
votes
2answers
811 views

Are “to medal” and “to podium” verbs? [duplicate]

I have heard the word medal used as a verb recently by members of the (BBC) Rio 2016 commentary team and on occasion to podium even slipped in - is this a common phenomenon? Perusal of the internet ...
1
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3answers
315 views

Do “Skilling” and “Teaching” have different meanings? [closed]

I'm working on a corporate training project where the project lead insists that we are "Skilling" people (not training them) and we are offering "Personnel Skilling" programs. She insists it's proper ...
1
vote
3answers
193 views

Looking for a word or phrase that describes the “flattening” or “smoothing” of a learning curve

A word or phrase that describes the process of making something more easily comprehensible. (I would actually like to exclude the 'learning curve' idiom) Examples; "How might we make this topic more ...
0
votes
2answers
149 views

Concerning as a verb?

During a conversation, I said "I am not concerning", instead of opting for " I am not concerned". I figured it would be alright as "I am not hurting" instead of "I am not hurt" is perfectly fine (...
0
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2answers
99 views

Boogie Woogie Verbing

I'm writing a caption for a cartoon using the musical genre "Boogie Woogie" as a verb. Which do you think is the most correct? Which is most clearly understandable? a) Boogie-woogie-ing b) Boogie ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”

The chambers inside the pyramid were closed (to/for) visitors (to clean and repair/for cleaning and repairing). Which is the correct alternative in both the brackets, and why? Please explain in ...
3
votes
4answers
5k views

Usage of the word suicide - validity of 'suiciding'

Is 'suiciding' a valid word by itself? I have very rarely come across suicide being used in this form. Mostly, you see it being used with the prefix 'commit' as in 'committing suicide' rather than '...
14
votes
5answers
3k views

“Hello” as a verb

A dictionary says that Hello could be a verb, noun and interjection. I'm not sure I saw it to be a verb though. Q: Could someone provide an example of 'hello' where it's used as verb. In the meaning ...
6
votes
1answer
740 views

Is the suffix “-ize” particularly productive in the morphological domain of nouns ending in “-nym”?

On a recent question asking if acronymize is a word, a comment caught my attention: Why bother to acronymize? If I'm going to take such liberties, I might as well just acronym the text. This ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a word for made up verbs that end in “ing”?

One thing I love about English is that verbs can be easily created just by adding the suffix "-ing" and adjectives by adding "-ly". How would you call this phenomenon? Examples: Googling, ...
-1
votes
1answer
160 views

“buying cookies will deliver on our promise” - can I use subject and verb like this?

A bit of context: a couple decided not to spend money on unecessary stuff and they promised that to each other. Later, one of them says: I dont believe that buying cookies will deliver on our ...
-2
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2answers
2k views

“I can command English.”

I saw a sentence: "I would like to be a scientist who can command English." What do you think about usage of "command"? Should we say " ...who has a good command of English."? Could you please ...
4
votes
1answer
414 views

To “Macgyver” or to “macgyver”?

I recently came across this usage “we Macgyver…” and the use of the upper case caught my attention. I googled the word to see if it is mentioned in the dictionary; Wiktionary gave me this result, ...
2
votes
2answers
423 views

Is it correct English to turn interjections such as “ah”, “oh”, “um” “huh”, “hem” into verbs?

For example: she ahhed/ohhed/ummed/huhhed/hemmed. Or is this possible only with some interjections?
13
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3answers
41k views

Which nouns can be used as verbs?

Someone told me that the English language is special (compared to German, at least) in the way that every noun could be used as a verb. I think this phenomenon is called supine. Is this correct? ...
1
vote
3answers
13k views

Cheersing vs cheering [closed]

I have come across the word "cheersing", with an "s", as opposed to what I believe to be the correct form: cheering. I think it comes from a misguided verbification of the exclamation "cheers!", as ...
0
votes
1answer
679 views

Is the word “Einstein” a verb? [closed]

I know that a lot of people use the word "Einstein" to convey someone as a genius, but I was wondering if Einstein, as a verb, is an official term.
14
votes
5answers
2k views

Can a noun (such as “duct tape”) be used as a verb?

I found the phrase “duct-tape together” in the following sentence of a Washington Post (June 21) article written by Chris Cillizza under the title “Gingrich campaign hit by more departures.” The ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

Can “snob” be used as a verb?

I commonly see "snob someone off", where the word they should correctly use is snub. Is using "snob" as a verb forever a no-no? Is it creeping towards accepted usage?
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun?

Is it possible to verb anything other than a noun? Although slightly meta, I noticed that English SE has verbing as a tag, rather than verbing-nouns.
15
votes
3answers
6k views

Should capitals be used when verbing trademarks?

When using a trademark as a verb ("hoovering", "xeroxing", "photoshopping" and "googling"), should it be capitalized or uncapitalized? Strictly speaking, Google and Adobe are opposed to their ...
3
votes
4answers
2k views

Abbreviations for nouns / noun phrases used as non-nouns

In an answer to another question, steven_desu argued that it was “technically incorrect” to use the word “e-mail” or “email” as a verb because it stands for “electronic mail.” I do not argue whether ...