Questions tagged [usage]

For questions on how and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

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2answers
49 views

Which is correct: “The animal within you” or “The animal within yourself”?

I'm coming up with a slogan for my DJ personal brand. I want to convey the idea that we all have a wild side in us waiting to be triggered. From similar questions, it seems that either version would ...
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1answer
107 views

Which sentence is correct? Which tense is better to use?

How to say grammatically correct that I had a problem, but then it's gone when I tried a recommendation: I had the same problem. Thanks, recommendation above helps me! or I had the same problem....
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0answers
21 views

“around” = “on the subject of”

In recent months I have on a number of occasions heard people use the word "around" when they mean "on the subject of." E.g. "I can answer your questions around your ...
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1answer
40 views

What does “Bastion of righteousness” mean? [closed]

I heard someone use this to describe star wars Obi Wan Kenobi. I know it must mean the quality of being morally right or justifiable but can you define it more specifically.
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1answer
105 views

“Since” being used in conditional sentences

I've come across this line in a movie: Ever since she got her test results back, she'd get mad whenever someone asked her about it. I've known about how "since" can only be used in present/...
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1answer
32 views

How to mention an uncertain object/thing in English?

I want to know how to mention an uncertain object, like X country. e.g. I want to go to a certain country no matter where it is because I just need to go out right now. I found a Question on this ...
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1answer
118 views

Is it correct to write “the adjacent room” even if there are multiple adjacent rooms?

Recently, I posted a puzzle on Puzzling.SE. The puzzle describes a prison containing thousands of hallways which all run next to each other, like the pipes in a pan flute. In my description of the ...
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1answer
58 views

Notes in a business report without a verb?

There are notes a in business report like 'Contractor to proceed as per the comments'. I really wonder that there is not verb to complete the sentence and apparently it looks to use as 'contractor ...
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1answer
167 views

Is using “than with” to connect an independent clause to a dependent clause is grammatically correct?

"Human processor model of interaction, in cognitive psychology, views the user as another computer in the system. In this model, the user is like a computer processor that takes input from the ...
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1answer
81 views

Correct form of saying of what will be left?

Imagine a hypothetical situation that someone is left to do home duties and you are writing a note to him. Which is the correct form? 1) "Turn on the robot cleaner. After it finishes all that will be ...
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1answer
44 views

Why does standard usage of “percentile” vary from other _iles (quartiles, deciles, etc.)?

In my experience, the standard usage of "percentile" is as given by OED (September 2018): Each of the 99 intermediate values of a variate which divide a frequency distribution into 100 ...
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1answer
2k views

“Departed” or “departed from” before place/object?

I'm working on an essay and the first line of my introductory paragraph currently reads as: Too many times, when sitting in an English classroom, have bitter groans departed the lips of around ...
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2answers
43 views

“Imaginatively” as a synonym for “in imagination”

The expression "in imagination" shows up in phrases such as "meanings may be infinitely combined and rearranged in imagination" (John Dewey). I have also, just once or twice, heard ...
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0answers
28 views

“Don't try to be a hero” vs “Don't try and be a hero”

"Don't try to be a hero" "Don't try and be a hero" What's the difference? They both seem to be common according to Google. Do they mean exactly the same thing? Is one more ...
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0answers
36 views

Usage of “of” with an implicit object

Consider this sentence from an article about a killing: “Based on repeated threats on the night of, they (Rose, Ford and Liakos) decided to go on a scouting mission that was preserved on video,” ...
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1answer
41 views

Can one use transpire in the future tense?

My partner used the phrase ".... something planned... whether it transpires or not remains to be seen.". Now, I don't know for a fact, but I feel that transpir(es/ed) is (or should be) used ...
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1answer
63 views

Can “filter for x” be used in two opposite senses?

Can "filter for" be used in the following sense: "ABC is very important as it filters for high quality and reliable results." Filter for has been used as filter out: "8. to ...
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0answers
27 views

Formal email/letter writing : correct usage of “issue which pertains to” / “issue pertaining to” /“issue that pertains to”

In my humble attempt at writing a classy formal letter, I am stuck with a bug in my brain .. probably due to my background of a non-native speaker of English. I am trying to draw the reader's ...
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6answers
9k views

Why don't Americans refer to Indians (and others from the subcontinent) as Asians?

I know there is a related question here, but I am not seeing an answer to "Why is there a difference?" Merely that an explanation of what is used in each country. I am a speaker of American English, ...
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5answers
31k views

Preposition in vs. of

Which is correct; "in" poverty or "of" poverty? The children have survived 10 years of poverty. or The children have survived 10 years in poverty. Thank you!
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0answers
19 views

For a long time (future)-Usage

I am looking to tell my group of long-time friends, that the meet up they had last week (which I missed) would hopefully not be the last one for at least the next several months. Would it be fine to ...
1
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1answer
46 views

Revisiting “ee.g.” (versus “e.g.”)

How is "e.g." pluralized? Responses to the above article and other critiques of "ee.g." (insisting on "e.g.") roundly dismiss it as an aberration and even vilify it. Yet ...
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1answer
31 views

Crossing / Knocking at/on door

Context: I have received a feedback request for an interview process. The company didn't offer me the job, but I appreciate their approach in requesting feedback, so I am inclined to provide it. ...
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0answers
34 views

Hyphenation of compound adjective as object complement

Consider these three cases: Here is the up-to-date information. Mark this information up-to-date. This information is up to date. Those are spelled the ways that feel correct to me, but I'm not ...
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3answers
117 views

Can “that” as a pronoun be used without a leading noun?

An apple is on the table edit: apparently these two didn't get separated when I typed it in. It's now separated I looked at that "That" is used as a pronoun In this case, "apple"...
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4answers
27k views

Is “left for heaven” a common phrase in English?

Is "left for heaven" a common phrase for native English speakers?
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1answer
49 views

This reminds me of… how to use the word “remind” if we have no personal memory of something

Let me preface this by saying English isn't my first language. There was a comment by an user on facebook today that went like "This reminds me of the 90's", but the user was born in 94 so ...
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3answers
1k views

Preposition to use with the phrase “come to an understanding”

So, I'm to translate a sentence to English. It's something like: We've succeeded in coming to an understanding ______ all questions discussed. I suppose that I should use either about or in to ...
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1answer
76 views

What is the convention for use of “volume” or “amount” in reference to quantity of data?

"Volume" is commonly used to refer to indefinite and definite (usually large) quantities of data or rates of data throughput (e.g., "The volume of data we delivered on each date is provided in the ...
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1answer
43 views

Many users, one address each: Users address? Users addresses? User addresses? [duplicate]

In the context of writing a technical document, I need to refer to a data structure that contains a list of addresses, in fact one address for each user in the system. Should I call this data ...
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1answer
46 views

What is the difference between “in the extent that” and “in the extent to which”? [closed]

So, if you replace "in the extent to which" by "in the extent that" in the following sentence, will it mean the same thing? There is a limitation in the extent to which Sarah can ...
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0answers
16 views

Can “Free” be a noun? And what does it mean? [duplicate]

I saw this sentence when I was studying British Culture. "William Shakespeare composed plays that broke FREE of England's past style of plays and theatre." I was quite confused about the ...
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2answers
16k views

trend for / in / of?

Hi guys, Pls kindly refer to the diagram shown above. Which prep is ok in the sentence: The trends for / in / of both commodities are very similar. I have looked up my Oxford dictionary and I ...
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2answers
2k views

A particular usage of the word 'had'

My question stems from the usage of the word 'had' in contexts indicating consumption. For example: "I had a glass of water." A second example: "I had a great time." My traditional understanding of ...
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1answer
36 views

Which example sentence is better? [closed]

I'm unsure which would be the best way to write the following example sentence: You asked me to call you today about X. You asked me to call you about X today.
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4answers
852 views

Is the term “sexual preference” generally considered offensive now, and has it always been?

In American politics, Judge Amy Barrett used the term "sexual preference" during her confirmation hearing. This was criticized as offensive by writers at publications such as CNN, USAToday, ...
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6answers
15k views

The etymology of “redhead” vs. “ginger haired”

All my life I have known people with reddish, orangey hair, to be termed ginger haired. Just as you don't call a blonde a 'yellow head' red head just wasn't a word that was said (wouldn't orange head ...
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2answers
114k views

“Still” and “Yet” as Conjunctions

I know there are already many posts on still and yet, but I really find it difficult to use them as conjunction as in following sentences: It's a small car, yet/still it's surprisingly ...
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0answers
30 views

Proper usage of 'more often' , 'more frequent'.?

When we read an article on the internet saying that some Event X takes place more often than you think. What is in the mind of the author who writes this article? Does the usage of more often implies ...
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6answers
1k views

Word for inability to think in certain ways

Am looking for a word that loosely means inability to think in certain ways. For example, for lyricists (or writers) lyrics come so naturally, but for non-lyricists it's very difficult to think how ...
0
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0answers
31 views

Can I use 'more younger' in some cases?

Let's assume a woman is 50 and looking for a younger guys above 30 and I am 20. Would this be a right sentence? I see you are looking for a younger man, but why not even more younger?
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1answer
55 views

“Insistently believing that this is a photo of Neil Armstrong in the face of everyone else's…” Can one really insistently believe something?

The sub-context is that there's an iconic photo of Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin on the Moon taken by a large format Hasselblad camera and in Aldrin's gold reflective visor one can see the photographer ...
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3answers
4k views

Is there a term/word for using an incorrect homophone

What would you call the following: Speak now or forever hold your piece.
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0answers
23 views

Schoolchildren population or schoolchild population?

Although we are taught to use singular adjectives to modify nouns, "schoolchildren" population seems to be a more commonly heard and searched (Google) option than the true singular "...
1
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1answer
72 views

Difficulty understanding how the word “actual” works in “…actual problems that you face.”

My question is about a sentence that I found in another SE site's help center, and I'm genuinely befuddled because I am having a hard time understanding how many ways the word "actual" can ...
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4answers
37k views

Usage of recommend?

I can’t recommend the book enough. Does it mean that it’s not a good book or it’s a really really good book?
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2answers
61 views

Verbs “COME” and “GO” followed by the gerund

Good evening everyone, I was listening to Tears for Fears' song Everybody wants to rule the world, and I came across the line "when the walls come tumbling down". I looked the expression up ...
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3answers
53k views

I haven't seen her “for”/“in” two days

What's the difference between using either for or in in the following examples? Bill hasn't taken a vacation for/in two years. Jack hasn't been to school for/in four days. I hadn't seen Mary for/in ...
8
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2answers
5k views

Split horizontally or vertically – which one is which?

Given some object, you can split it with a horizontal cut into two objects that are laid out vertically (above each other), or you can split it with a vertical cut into two objects that are laid out ...
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0answers
805 views

How to create a correct statement: the usage of the verb TO DO

I would like to create a statement for an exercise. Pretend you are a positive character from a fairy tale. Describe what you see, what you do, how you feel. My question: Is ok what you do or ...

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