Questions tagged [usage]

For questions on how and why certain words are used in varying ways within various contexts.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
2 views

Is this sentence really grammatical?

there's one kind of sentence structure that has been troubling me for a while now, and unable to find answers to my doubts, I'm here to ask for u guys' kind help! My sentence is as follows: "It is ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

How “much” emissions or how “many” emissions?

The following is what I found in the website of US Energy Information Administration. Is the word "emissions" usually used with "much" as in the quotation? If so, why is the verb "are" used instead ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

Can I use “any” when offering and requesting something?

I've learnt that "any" is generally used in questions, but we may use "some" in questions when offering or requesting something. Examples: Would you like some bread? (offer) Can I have some water, ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Can I say “wonder of” instead of “wonder about”?

This is certainly non-idiomatic, and it is strange. If I am lucky, I think I might get away with something like this by profoundly abusing the syntax of the language, but I cannot do it alone. I ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

I won't be able to make the meeting vs I won't be able to make it to the meeting

Do these sentences mean the same thing? What does "it" refer to when they say "make it"?
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Which one is correct, honorable mention or honorary mention?

Looking at the definition on Google, looks like both can be used interchangeably. Is it true? Or is there some nuance to it? Thanks!
0
votes
0answers
42 views

Can a device produce “certain wavelengths” or only “light at certain wavelengths”?

I want to write a sentence like this: "Our product produces exactly the right wavelengths to drive photosynthesis". But I am not sure if this is a correct usage of the term "wavelengths". After all, ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Is it correct to use “opposite side” instead of “other side” in the context of a debate? [closed]

Opposite side sounds like I am talking about a street, airplane, something physical. When I Google opposite side of a debate, mostly I get references mentioning other side of a debate. Is opposite ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

“scroll up something” or “scroll something up”

I'm trying to find the right way of expressing myself in a code comment. I have a list and I'm basically scrolling up/down in this list. Should I use scroll things up/down or scroll up/down things for ...
-1
votes
1answer
52 views

Can you start a sentence with Such as?

"Even though I am not fortunate enough to visit the campus, reading about Notre Dame makes me feel at home with its attention to tradition, its history of innovations, academic research, and service ...
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

English grammar: time and place in a sentence?

Is it compulsory to always place time at the end of a sentence? For example: "I bought a cake in the morning. I ate the cake in the afternoon." "In the morning, I bought a cake. In the afternoon, I ...
0
votes
1answer
26 views

Notes in a business report without a verb?

There are notes a in business report like 'Contractor to proceed as per the comments'. I really wonder that there is not verb to complete the sentence and apparently it looks to use as 'contractor ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

“Intent of” versus “intent to”

I'm writing an essay and looking to explain my intentions behind a creation. I'm stuck on the usage of the word intent. Is this the correct usage: I did (xyz) with the intent of creating an (abc). ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Meaning of “Do not expect troubles as they have a tendency not to disappoint”

In Think and Grow Rich Chapter 16, the author said, Do not expect troubles as they have a tendency not to disappoint. Why do troubles "have a tendency not to disappoint"? Don't they "have a ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Correct form of saying of what will be left?

Imagine a hypothetical situation that someone is left to do home duties and you are writing a note to him. Which is the correct form? 1) "Turn on the robot cleaner. After it finishes all that will be ...
4
votes
4answers
142 views

Position description for 'lying on the side propped up on one elbow with the hand supporting the head'

Is there a common phrase or a better, shorter way to describe this man's body position? "He was lying on his side, propped up on one/his elbow, hand supporting his head." Which makes it clear he is ...
3
votes
6answers
161 views

Has “Brexit” become an everyday verb in English?

I've heard that Brexit has become an everyday verb in French. Apparently Brexiter is: 'a verb used to announce to everyone that you are leaving, but without going anywhere’ and there's even a ...
21
votes
7answers
7k views

Is there a heavy usage of the word “bonfire” in English?

I wonder if the word "bonfire" is very often used in the English language. Maybe in different contexts than just the burning of something for fun, which is the main translation as I understood. I ...
2
votes
0answers
71 views

Term for/etymology of the opposite of a nosism (using 'we' to mean 'you')

A nosism is the term for using 'we' to refer to oneself. I am looking for a term for/etymology of using 'we' to mean 'you'. EDIT: Another way of putting it is that I'm looking for the proper term ...
0
votes
2answers
101 views

Can “x exclusive” and/or “x-exclusive” mean that x is excluded?

Is it reasonable for the statement "y is x exclusive" to mean "y does not include the patronage of x"? For instance, is it correct to say that a "whites-only" drinking fountain was black people ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

What does the word “horde” mean in the context of a well-known rhyme “Hickory, dickory..”?

So I looked up the most common version of the rhyme and it goes like this: Hickory, dickory, dock. The mouse ran up the clock. The clock struck one, The mouse ran down, Hickory, dickory, dock. But ...
1
vote
2answers
30 views

Meaning of “holds for” in quote

Bell's inequality holds for all non-product states To my understanding, this sentence should mean "Bell's inequality is correct for all non-product states". But the true meaning is "Bell's inequality ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Combining Access request /revoke in one line [or is it better to split for clarity purposes]

Dear English language experts, I am writing to you from the perspective of an end user, who submits IT requests every now and then. When a request needs to be submitted, there is a special web form ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

What noun should I use when I want “seekability”?

This is programming lingo and apparently not a word in the dictionary and so I would like to be able to solve "this problem" with only dictionary primitives. (If you allow me to speak that away.) A ...
1
vote
0answers
59 views

What does Trump's usage of “unable to” in this tweet of his indicate/convey? [closed]

Here's the tweet. Quote: [...] to produce & sign into law major Criminal Justice Reform legislation, [...] and which was unable to get done in past administrations As a non-native English ...
1
vote
0answers
43 views

Are there English dialects that still use the verb “to snithe”?

Wiktionary says that it's used in some dialects in Northern England, but I wonder if that information is still up-to-date. Have you personally heard the verb being used?
0
votes
1answer
24 views

What kind of word is “Frankenstein” in this context?

This question was asked on ell.SE - https://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/228380/when-you-frankenstein-a-team-together-is-frankenstein-a-new-verb ...and as answered over there, the verb "To ...
0
votes
0answers
30 views

Use of an Article for Performance

The word performance in the broadest sense is a countable noun and hence would require an article. However, what happens in a different context when performance is not countable. Which of these two ...
1
vote
2answers
81 views

What does “Extraordinary” mean in the name of a job? [closed]

It is said that Franz Liszt worked as Grand Ducal Director of Music Extraordinary at Weimar court. What does Extraordinary mean in the name of a job? I remember in an episode of The Office, the ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

In a week versus After a week

"I'll be back in a week" means "I'll be back after a week has passed" or "I'll be back after the next seven day's period is over". I've done a great deal of research to find out whether "I'll be back ...
-1
votes
2answers
155 views

Is the phrase “You are requested” polite or rude?

My supervisor and I wrote a research paper to be sent to journal for review. My supervisor wrote the cover letter of the paper as Dear Editor in Chief You are requested to review the paper "...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

“Cousins in love” — “Cousins in Law”?

In the first chapter of Jane Austen's Mansfield Park, Lady Betram and Mrs Norris present to Sir Thomas their idea of adopting Fanny's daughter. This will provide some relief for the Price's ...
1
vote
0answers
22 views

Is there any mistake in this sentence below? Should 'it' be deleted in the sentence? [closed]

I saw the sentence like this What memories do you think it will happen today? I think 'it' is an unnecessary word for this sentence. What is the meaning of the sentence above? And is there any ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Can I use the word “Kerfuffle”in formal writing?

I would like to find out if I can use the word kerfuffle in formal writing. English is not my first language and I am thinking of using the word Kerfuffle in my exam report.Is it too informal? Here ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Can you say “Are they three” talking about inaninate things?

Are they three? Can it be in proper English, things, or is it more correct to use "Are there three?" or "Are there three of them?" Is it hypercorrection or some are more natural than the other ones?
0
votes
2answers
59 views

Exist or Exists? [closed]

I am writing a paper on the topic of “dharma”. I have written: “Within these two categories exists all forms and definitions of dharma.” I am stumped! Is it supposed to be exist or exists, and why?
2
votes
1answer
108 views

Master to mister?

Why was Master weakened to Mister so as to address individual hominēs sapientēs and the English language lost the thou/you distinction while the Greek language kept both Kύριος intact and the Eσύ/...
0
votes
2answers
59 views

“Further the goal”: is this use correct?

Does the word "Further" fit naturally in the following sentence? "The modern thinkers believe that by attracting the young generation towards museums, the management furthers the fundamental goal of ...
0
votes
1answer
42 views

Do you use 'a man of effort'? [closed]

I'm a Korean. In a Korean textbook, there's 'He's a man of effort.' Do you use this expression? then
1
vote
2answers
58 views

What does the word “matted” mean?

I've just moved to London with my parents and I'm not very confident with my English language knowledge. I need to write an essay for my English classes on the topic "home decorations". We have a list ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Comma usage in a series [duplicate]

What is the rule on the use of commas in a series? Is it medical, dental, and behavioural or medical, dental and behavioural?
0
votes
2answers
54 views

Is this correct [closed]

"Now he occasionally felt like working" in a oxford Bookworm Should not it be "feels" instead of felt ?
0
votes
1answer
30 views

How to write arithmetics inline in a sentence?

I'm trying to wrap my head around the following sentence (this is about maritime and ports): If you are fixing a 10 days port call in a month having a 0.5 ratio would result in (10 x 0.5 = 5 days) ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Is this a valid either-or sentence?

I read this a few days ago: ... individuals who log on and float either instead of or in addition to scheduling hours. I suppose it sounds awkward to me because I tend to think that in a sentence of ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Variations of “I'll let you know when it's done”

Do all these sentences mean the same thing or are there any subtle differences among them? I'll let you know when it's done. I'll let you know when done. I'll let you know when it has ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

“I look forward to … ” something that isn't certain to occur

Is it grammatically correct (and then what is the social undertone) to write "I look forward to joining your team" if I am in fact only applying to join said team, but it is not at all certain to ...
-1
votes
3answers
44 views

Word that best describes a set of people have gotten used to accepting mediocrity or failure

What is the word to describe when a person or set of people have gotten used to accepting mediocrity or failure
3
votes
1answer
54 views

What's the difference between index and indicator?

My phrase is: "The main (indexes / indicators) of regional development". Which noun should I use? I have searched for any difference in their meanings on the Internet, but didn't find anything ...
0
votes
0answers
61 views

What does the expression “ranging from something to something” mean?

I am studying for a TOEFL exam and I have a question about this particular exercise. The exercise is about a short text which talks about what is aggression and the theories that study it. Edit: Here ...