Questions tagged [typography]

The style and appearance of printed matter. The art or procedure of arranging type.

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Footnote style using asterisk should have space or no space between symbol and note? [migrated]

When referencing a footnote using an asterisk or other acceptable symbols such as dagger and double dagger, in the footnote itself do you put a space between the symbol and the note? Example: This is ...
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3 answers
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What kind of error is using Women instead of Woman

An online argument. Guy says "You are looking for a women". Girl replies "talking all that sh*t with bad Grammar". Guy replies "Spelling is not a part of Grammar". ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Indentation following a Zareba [closed]

Is there an indentation following a section break that indicates a time lapse? I know if you double-space in fiction to indicate a break in thought, there is no line indentation in the first line ...
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2 answers
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Hyphenated Word Split Between Pages?

I am currently proofreading a typeset document that's automatically hyphenated "client" to justify a line. The bottom of one page has "cli-", and then, after a page turn, "-...
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27 votes
2 answers
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Word for how the white space between words can form patterns

Nota Bene: I included a term to describe this thing, but I'm not here to invent a word, it was included as a humorous nod; thank you for your patience and understanding! I apologize if this is an odd ...
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Are the size of tittles the same as the size of the full stop, or the dot in an exclamation mark? [closed]

As the title says: are the tittles the same size as the full stop, or the dots in an exclamation and question marks? If they are different, is there any reason for this?
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When should Latinisms be Italicized? [duplicate]

Some Latinisms are usually italicized in English whereas some Latin loanwords are not, even in the same text. However, I cannot find any clear pattern. Are there clear rules or guidelines about it? ...
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2 votes
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What is the name of this squiggle symbol? [closed]

I came across a strange symbol while reading the report on the ALGOL 58 programming language (p. 19): I am referring to the squiggle that appears repeated three times after some semicolons and commas ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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“She´s happy” vs “She's happy” vs “She’s happy” vs ...?

I’ve always wondered what the correct apostrophe is when using contractions. Should I use She´s happy or She's happy? English´s a universal language. English's a universal language. Why do a lot of ...
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Need to learn to write by hand more neat and fast

I searched the internet for tips for writing both fast and neat for exams but only found a few tips on the internet, so I came here looking if anyone had any trade secrets they may be able to share. ...
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1 answer
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What is the accepted typography for latin phrases? [duplicate]

In an academic article, i'm using a lot of latin phrases both abbreviated (i.e., e.g., etc.) and spelt out (de facto, in situ...). I know that in certain languages, the most commonly accepted form is ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Recommended way to format copyright?

I'm working on a website and want to have a short mention of the copyright of said website in its footer. What is the recommended formatting for such a thing? I've seen "© YYYY Company", "© Company, ...
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Why are sub-subsections of the Irish constitution marked with the degree symbol? [closed]

The accepted legal practice when referring to sub-subsections of the Irish constitution is to use the degree symbol to mark sub-subsections. For example, Art 40.3.3°. This convention is not used for ...
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Is there a formal word for when one or more words line up, but are on different lines?

Not entirely sure if this is the best place to ask, but I've always wondered if there is actually a word for this. In the image below, the words "this is" line up. Sometimes this happens when I'm ...
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2 votes
3 answers
108 views

Can I put a line break between "von" and "Neumann"?

I'm working on a project that discusses John von Neumann. Is it okay to line-break between "von" and "Neumann," or should I specify this as a non-breaking space?
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Do I need to use quotes when referring to something? [closed]

Do I need to use quotes here? You can find those terms under the separate section called “Earthquakes” later in this chapter. If no quotes are needed, must the word Earthquake still start with a ...
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1 answer
152 views

Wrong letter cases

When someone writes a title with the wrong letter cases ex: "my Title", is this considered a typo? If not, what is the name of this error?
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1 vote
1 answer
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Should we superscript ordinal numbers? [closed]

I have noticed that sometimes we write ordinal numbers with the "th" a little higher than the numbers. But sometimes I see it just attached to it. Which one is correct?
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What is the numerals style that goes above/below the standard height called, and is there a historic reason behind it?

It's often found on Wikipedia in the titles of articles, and here on this site: 1916 In the example above (if it doesn't render correctly, say you're on mobile, see image below), the 9's tail goes ...
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1 answer
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Should commas *always* be followed by spaces?

When teaching and proofreading, I often come across examples of commas without spaces following them (e.g. "London,UK" or "apples,oranges,bananas"). In addition to correcting these, I would like to ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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Which part is the tail of the letter "r"?

I'd like to ask about the sentence from A Case of Identity by Conan Doyle. "a slight defect in the tail of the ‘r.’ " Which part is the tail of "r"? A: The lower part of the straight line of "r". ...
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Which is a more common way, 10+ or 10 then + as superscript?

I don't know which shortened form of "10 or more" is more appropriate, is it 10+ or 10+ (i.e. with the plus sign as superscript). What do you think? Extra question, when do we use superscript in ...
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2 votes
1 answer
188 views

Comma before 'if' in maths definition

I wonder if there is clear guidance about the following construction: We say that a foo admits a bar, if baz is quz. I feel that the comma before if breaks the structure of the sentence, and ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Pilcrow question

Is there a difference between a shaded and an unshaded pilcrow? I am trying to format a block letter and in the unarranged copy, I am supposed to correct- there are both unshaded and shaded pilcrows.
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3 votes
2 answers
380 views

What is the equivalent of "euphony" when applied to writing?

In the details below, I use something to stand in for the word I am looking for. Speech may have euphony; writing may have something. For example, when writing about the relative sizes of items, I ...
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1 vote
2 answers
346 views

Word for using extra line breaks to improve readability

I just got a copy of Royal Skousen's The Book of Mormon: The Earliest Text (Yale, 2009), and was immediately struck by his implementation of what he calls "sense-lines": that is, the editor ...
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1 vote
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When should terms be italicized versus put in quotes?

When a new term is introduced in a book I am writing or an unusual word or phrase is described I either italicize it, or put it in quotes. However, this has led to an inconsistency in which some terms ...
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2 votes
1 answer
389 views

Li­ga­tured glyphs vs. Words

When two let­ters are joined as a lig­a­ture, I un­der­stand they are con­sid­ered to be one in­di­vid­u­al glyph. I al­so un­der­stand that let­ters on their own like D or S are con­sid­ered nouns or ...
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1 vote
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A word for the circular guides that determine the curve of font serifs?

Serif fonts are usually constructed using circular guides to establish the curves of the serifs. Example: Is there a word for these circles?
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2 votes
1 answer
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If a speaker clearly emphasizes a word or a term, should it be written down in quotation marks?

If a speaker clearly emphasizes a word or a term, should it be written down in quotation marks? e.g. Everyone's so intimidated by "big data."
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1 answer
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Does it need quotation marks on abstract nouns

I know for sure it needs quotation marks on verbs do, love and etc, in following sentence: Human related actions like "do", "love", "hate", "sacrifice", and so on. Because it would not be right ...
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2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Opening and closing a letter - is there a name for this style?

Sorry if this isn’t the right place for this question, but I’ve Googled high and low and found nothing. I’ve noticed that some letters start and close with handwriting, e.g. “Dear Mrs Smith” and “...
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1 answer
382 views

Is "well" an adjective?

I read a Cambridge advanced grammar in use and there's one line says We can use sufficiently before adjectives to express a similar meaning to enough. Sufficiently is often preferred in more formal ...
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42 votes
3 answers
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Is there a name for text that reads the same upside-down? [duplicate]

This is similar to a palindrome but, instead of a word/sentence that reads the same forwards and backward, is there a word for words/sentences that read the same right side up and upside-down? See ...
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9 votes
3 answers
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Is there a word for when a logo uses an image for one of the letters?

There's a million examples of this, but the one that comes to mind is "smoke shop" with images of pipes in place of the "S"s, like this: Is there a word for this? Edit, September 26, 2018 Thanks, @...
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3 votes
1 answer
529 views

A word for decorations added to letters

Is there a word for the artistic decorations that are often added to letters in some type-faces / fonts (e.g. caligraphy, etc.) I'm thinking like a serif, but as far as I know, (I'm open to ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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use '/\' to denote that one missed something while writing

I have seen many people use '/\' to denote that they missed something while writing the sentence. Then, above that symbol they write what they missed. Are you aware of this practice? Let's say, I am ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is "to battle (something) off" correct?

In the passage Lesson 13 from "400 Must-have words for the TOELF" by McGraw-Hill, there is a sentence that I don't understand. "According to legend, his arrogance invoked the wrath of God, who ...
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0 votes
1 answer
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Quotation marks around a new word when I keep using the word?

I'm writing a technical thesis and I need to explain the meaning of a lot of words. However I'm not a native English speaker. The so-called "blah" is a thing that does this and that. Blah was an ...
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3 votes
2 answers
164 views

What is the category/group for the typographical terms serif and sans-serif

I teach introductory typography to students studying graphic design. While constructing a list of design factors that affect the appearance, readability, and legibility of a typographic letterform, ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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Why Was Title Case Invented?

I've seen questions and answers about the "when", but I don't really understand the reason to use this Horrible Way to Type Sentences Which Obviously Hinders Readability. It's really bad when in a ...
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8 votes
3 answers
2k views

History and usage of the term “furore”

Furore entered the English language by the end of the 18th century to refer to a “wave of enthusiastic admiration”: 1790, Italian form of furor, borrowed into English originally in the sense "...
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3 votes
2 answers
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How should the name of a series of books be formatted?

I know that you underline – or if you're typing, you put the words in italics – the titles of books, and that you put chapters or quotations from a book in "quotes," but do you do anything to the font ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Is it proper to use all caps for an organization name that is not an acronym?

I'm editing copy for a nine-part educational series about a non-profit organization that I will call Foo Society here. They do admirable work and I'm happy to help more people learn about them. ...
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Capitalization in 18th Century English [duplicate]

I have often wondered about the (seemingly) arbitrary capitalization of words in 17th & 18th century English, and again today, came across this quote by Edmund Burke in Sylvia Nasar's Grand ...
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3 votes
2 answers
406 views

Is there a name for this paragraph indentation style?

In longer form poems you sometimes see a verse where the first line is indented to the level of the end of the previous verse’s last line. For example, this Keats poem: or this poem from Wordsworth: ...
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12 votes
2 answers
2k views

Name for making the first few words in a chapter small caps?

What do you call the style of making the first few words of a chapter (or book, article, etc.) uppercase? Here is an example from J.D. Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye: To clarify, I'm not talking ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Using dashes for showing a dichotomy spelling

I have trouble with deciding how to use dashes in the following case: Before moving on, it is worth noting that the complex -- (non-complex) simple dichotomy is not the same as the complicated -- ...
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1 vote
0 answers
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Using ordinal indicators with Roman numerals [duplicate]

Is the use of ordinal indicators with Roman numerals grammatical and if grammatical, is it unneeded? For instance: She is in VIIth standard. What about in case the ordinal indicator was written as a ...
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8 votes
2 answers
16k views

Should spaces be used between "<" or ">" and numbers or letters?

Should spaces be used between "<" or ">" and numbers or letters? For symbols, what is right? P<10, P <10, P < 10 or P< 10? For numbers, what is right? 4>2, 4> 2, 4 > 2 or 4 >2? Is ...
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