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Questions tagged [translation]

Determining English equivalents for words or phrases in other languages (that is, translation into English). We don't actually do translations: we can try and help you with your own translation. Please see the detailed tag info for guidance on what to ask.

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14
votes
8answers
6k views

Translate the French quote “Il n’y a pas d'amour, il n’y a que des preuves d’amour” to English?

I’d like to translate a quote from Pierre Reverdy (or Jean Cocteau, this is an open question apparently). The quote is: Il n’y a pas d’amour, il n’y a que des preuves d’amour. For some context in ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

What is the word/ expression for 'when the content received via an information medium is transferred to another medium'?

I have viewed this answer but none of the answers quite match what I am looking for. The German term for this word is 'Medienbruch'. The translated definition on the corresponding wikipedia page is: ...
0
votes
0answers
59 views

When translating sentences into English I am told some my sentences don't fit English perfectly

In Turkey, our teachers tell us that some sentences we create are wrong. For example, in Turkish, "Başım ağrıyor.", that sentence's exact translation is "My head is aching". However our teachers are ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Evaluation of Inhabitants on/of/based on the Influence of Media?

I'm currently translating an abstract for personal purposes, but I'm not sure how I'd translate this part. I translated it as this: Self-Evaluation of Inhabitants **on (the)** Influence of Media (the ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

An idiom from Dostoyevsky

My first question is straightforward. What is the meaning of the following idiom (from Dusa McDuff's translation of Crime and Punishment):- "some bread and salt together but a pinch of sniff apart." ...
1
vote
1answer
86 views

How do you describe the expression of the boy on the left?

In Chinese, it's called "Xian Qi" which is a mix of dislike, avoid,refusal and disdain. It is usually used by people in the position of power or those who have advantage over others.
-3
votes
2answers
47 views

What do these sentences mean? Please translate or paraphrase [closed]

"There is in the works of Emerson an underlying tone of quiet appreciation." "There is stashed below the frigid depths of the arctic a magnificent treasure that no one has ever been able to recover." ...
-1
votes
0answers
45 views

Meaning of picking fields

I can't help myself with a phrase from the book Born to Run by Christopher McDougall (Random House, 2018) The hike alone could, quite literally, kill him, but Joe wasn’t worried. Even more than ...
3
votes
2answers
124 views

What is the equivalent proverb/idiom for Hindi saying in English?

Muh mein ram ram bagal mein churi It means Speak praise on the face and stab him from behind.
0
votes
0answers
10 views

About translation (how to understand a complex sentence) [migrated]

Project scheduling provides a detailed plan that represents how and when the project will deliver the products, services, and results defined in the project scope and serves as a tool for ...
25
votes
7answers
7k views

English equivalent of the Malayalam saying “don't stab/poke the dead body”?

ശവത്തിൽ കുത്തരുത് (śavattil kuttarut) is a Malayalam saying that in literal translation means "Don't stab/poke the dead body". The meaning would be something like: don't humiliate a person when he is ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

English equivalent of Russian “по кд”

There's a Russian gaming phrase "по кд" which means "fired/activated/used repeatedly and as soon as possible after the cooldown time". The example of it being used in World of Tanks - "Зашёл к нему в ...
12
votes
4answers
528 views

Equivalent of phrase 'emu parade' in other English-speaking places

In Australian English we have a phrase 'emu parade' which refers to the action of one or more people walking around searching for specific things on the ground in a certain area. For example, say you ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

Spelling of Vietnamese names in formal context

I am a professor and I have a Vietnamese student called, say, Nguyen Hoang Thang. How should I write his name in the official documents, such as his diploma or transcript? How should his name be ...
1
vote
5answers
113 views

Idiom for taking absolutely everything from someone

In Finnish, there is an idiom for taking everything from someone which translates roughly to "taking even the ashes from the stove". Is there an equivalent saying in English?
1
vote
2answers
110 views

Clean Words for the Money? [closed]

There is a discussion concerning how to translate the Norwegian expression ''Rene ord for Pengene" to English. The expression has the meaning that one has been quite forthright. Is it reasonable in ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

Is there a term to describe a word or idiom that translates literally as one thing, but is actually a specific word?

Is there a term to describe a word or idiom that translates literally as one thing, but is actually a specific word in the translated language? My best example would be 'pomme de terre' from French ...
6
votes
2answers
146 views

“Dasometry”: is this a common word in English? Is there more common alternative?

I am looking for a word that groups all measurements done in the trees or forest, like Tree height, Diameter at breast height, Basal Area, Volume, crown diameter, etc. In Spanish we have the word "...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

'refer friends to enroll' is this grammatically correct?

I was writing a paragraph for a friend and after finishing, I realized that it doesn't sound quite right. I feel as though there are issues with the grammar. For example : 'refer friends to enroll' - ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Word for very long and/or very complex mathematical expression?

In some Latinamerican countries (Spanish speaking) the word "chorizo" is sometimes colloqualy used to refer to a very long and/or very complex mathematical expression. This use is almost slang and it ...
4
votes
1answer
100 views

What do you call overtaking after overtakers? Not necessarily a single word, a phrase will do

What do we call the act of overtaking a vehicle which is already being overtaken by one or more cars? You see that some other car begins overtaking, and you join this overtaker, and others may join ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Is “financial low” correct?

I need to translate baja financiera (Spanish) or baixa financeira (Portuguese) into English. That idiom is a noun phrase used to describe a partial or total payment of a purchase or sale. I'll give ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

English equivalent of the French “Mettre au placard”

I am looking for an equivalent of the French “mettre au placard”. It literally translates as “to put in the closet” and describes the fact of assigning no missions to someone on the job without ...
1
vote
2answers
123 views

Chinese names in English [closed]

I have noticed certain Chinese names follow the English order, i.e., given name before family name, when occurring in English text, whereas others retain the Chinese order, i.e., family name before ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “sardine box” mean?

Can anybody explain what exactly a "sardine box" is ? Here are a few usage examples: "sardine boxes take us from here to there" "the motorized sardine box" It obviously refers to a vehicle, ...
2
votes
0answers
63 views

A rural dialect for “Why”? [closed]

Forgive me if this is the wrong place to ask about this. For context, I've been trying to figure out a good way to translate "なしてや", which is a dialect of どうして and なぜ. All of them mean "why, how". ...
6
votes
6answers
498 views

What's the term for a group of people who enjoy literary works?

I'm translating an essay to English from Korean, and it uses the term hyangyoo jibdan, which means "a group of people who enjoy literary works". What's the English term for that? (I've searched, but ...
17
votes
2answers
4k views

Correct word for a little toy that always stands up?

In Spanish, we have a word for a little toy that always stand up, "tentetieso". I want to search for those toys in English, but I can't find the correct word or specific description to find them.
8
votes
4answers
177 views

What do I call a building with a variable number of storeys?

I'm translating the description of a city block design. The city block (in this particular case) is basically a single building with a variable number of storeys: different sections of this block-...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Is there a word in English that express that something though less would suffice the need by the grace of God

Is there a word in English to substitute barka in the Arabic language to mean that though something is less but can be sufficient by the grace of Allah or God. For example: you have made a meal for ...
2
votes
2answers
74 views

How can I use formal speech in English?

I'm Patricia, from Brazil, and I'm translating my fantasy novel into English. I find it quite hard to express different levels of formality in this language. One of my characters is a mystical entity, ...
28
votes
5answers
4k views

You have no, but can try for yes

In Dutch there is the expression "Nee heb je, ja kan je krijgen." This roughly means that being told "no" after asking for something is only as bad as never asking in the first place. Is there a more ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

The usage of “out of the box.” [closed]

I faced this sentence in a book: Ann Trason had expected to be in front, but an eight-minute mile right out of the box was just nuts. Would you please help me with the meaning? Specially, I can't ...
0
votes
3answers
57 views

Live out in…What does it mean?

After my mother lost her job, she couldn’t afford to provide for me anymore. She gave me to my grandmother, who lived out in the rice field. May I know what ‘lived out in the rice fields’ means? ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

What's the meaning of “I may have lost a little bit of this year” in this sentence?

Does it mean that I lost a part of my idealism this year, or it says without a vision, my idealism would has been less? which one? I am really glad I wrote a vision because I think I would be a lot ...
37
votes
13answers
9k views

Is there an English equivalent for “Les carottes sont cuites”, while keeping the vegetable reference?

In French, we have this saying "Les carottes sont cuites", meaning "It's too late we can't do anything anymore" or "It's over for him" (He's dead) depending on the context. The literal translation ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

meaning of “to immigration” in this sentence?

Does it mean "climate change for immigration" or "climate change" and "immigration" are 2 different issues? In areas that range from occupational safety to climate change to immigration, legislators ...
0
votes
4answers
200 views

How can I translate the French expression “travailler en alternance” to English? [closed]

I am looking to translate the expression travailler en alternance into English. I have found several answers on the internet but none seems to match my use case. I am still at school and I am ...
1
vote
5answers
745 views

Having decision making power over someone's assets

I am trying to translate the German word "verfügen" or "Verfügung" in its legal sense into English. In dictionaries, I only find the translation of "to dispose" or "disposition", as in the "power of ...
2
votes
1answer
164 views

What was the profession 芸者 (female entertainer) called in Britain? [closed]

I am looking for an indigenous English word for women who entertained guests at social gatherings in Britain. To put it simply, I am looking for an English analogue of geisha.
0
votes
2answers
62 views

What is the Polish version and meaning of ''Don't make a village?'' [closed]

Someone at my work had this on his t-shirt and said it's a real typical Polish saying and found it hard to explain the meaning in English.
1
vote
1answer
94 views

How to translate FIAT into English?

I am translating a text in Portuguese to English from a Message of Our Lady, and there is this expression on the URGENT APPEALS Message nº 2,797: "O Senhor dirá: Faça-se; e tudo será transformado." ...
0
votes
1answer
90 views

What does it mean ((feeling flatter than a fritter))?

Please tell me the meaning of ((feeling flatter than a fritter)) in this paragraph: It is different every day. My whole day’s plans might go out the window because a teacher’s lesson plans change. ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Can the word 'centerpiece' be used figuratively?

The word 'centerpiece' refers to the decorative piece in the center of a dining table. In the German translation ('Kernstück'), we can also use it figuratively, e.g., to refer to the central point of ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Does English have a word for “not sick”?

In Danish, there is the word »rask« (I am sure there are similar words in other Germanic languages), which means either 'not sick' or 'quick'. The latter sense is largely context dependent, and ...
17
votes
11answers
4k views

Is it OK to say “The situation is pregnant with a crisis”?

I am translating a sentence to English that literally means: The world seems to be pregnant with an environmental crisis. By looking up pregnant in dictionaries like Cambridge and Merriam ...
1
vote
3answers
60 views

Looking for a well-known refrain or proverb indicating that some big trouble has just started

I am translating into English a famous refrain from Spanish, Ahí fue Troya. That means something like Then a big trouble started. I am looking for some correspondingly recognizable refrain I can ...
1
vote
1answer
184 views

Why is the Turkish president's surname is spelt in English as Erdogan, with g?

I recently got puzzled as to why American journalists spell the surname of the current Turkish president in articles written in English as Erdogan, with g (see, e.g., this article in New York Times). ...
1
vote
1answer
234 views

Another word for “ikigai”

I read with interest an article by Dr. Sanjay Gupta about human longevity in Japan on the CNN website. The main focus was on a word, and as so often happens in linguistics, also a concept: Ikigai ...
3
votes
1answer
113 views

An idiom meaning “a good horse is called a sorrel, a good young man is called fearless/crazy/bold”

Is there any idiom in English similar to Horse as boy, (brave) man as kook (are best). in which boy means sorrel. The latter is obvious. It is my translation(maybe it is wrong) to describe the ...