Questions tagged [translation]

Determining English equivalents for words or phrases in other languages (that is, translation into English). We don't actually do translations: we can try and help you with your own translation. Please see the detailed tag info for guidance on what to ask.

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1answer
398 views

What do following words/phrases mean? (2)

This is the continuation of the previous question: "What do following words/phrases mean? (1)". I'd appreciate any suggestions on what the bolded texts mean. We can vouch for the sweeter ...
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2answers
79 views

What does “hardpoints” and “dots” mean in the following context?

I'm working on translating the following text, which is an excerpt from an interview with a car designer: What’s interesting to me is not just the way car design has changed in the last 24 years, ...
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4answers
614 views

Good synonyms for the words 'smarthead' and 'smartass', for use in a translation

I am translating a book from Portuguese into English, one which I personally regard as a modern masterpiece, for being so close to my heart. The work has had a very profound impact among Brazilians, ...
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3answers
1k views

Telugu proverb equivalent in English

There is a proverb in Telugu language which is as below. అన్నం లేకపోయినా, పట్టుబట్ట కడతా అన్నాడట It translates to someone who doesn't have a morsel to eat but insists on wearing expensive clothes. ...
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4answers
273 views

Digestibly Explain Academic Literature Concept: A “message” is “relationship between 2 sets” where 1 set must be “ordered,” and the other “unordered” [closed]

I am trying to convert some pretty dense academic literature into a way that anyone could understand. I'm stuck on this one way in which they describe how a message works. Or how a language is used. ...
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1answer
230 views

If “lad”, “fella” and “bloke” are synonyms, then “hombre”, “homme” and “man” are _______? [duplicate]

Is there a technical term for the relationship between a word and its equivalents in other languages? I thought of cognate, but don't think it quite works, as cognates could include words like chief ...
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2answers
90 views

Equivalent of the Spanish term “a trasmano”

I am looking for an expression equivalent to this term as used in Argentina (and potentially other places. The Free Dictionary translates it as out of the way or out of [one's] way. This matches RAE'...
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4answers
260 views

Word for something which is part of a problem, blamed/feared/thought to be its cause, but isn't?

Question. What English word do you recommend for something which is thought or even openly blamed to be the reason for a real problem, but is at most a part or result of said problem, not its cause ...
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2answers
411 views

What it means if someone says,“it's getting to that point in the evening”. [closed]

Hello ladies and gentlemen, it is my first time that i try to translate a film to my own language , and i have got now a problem because i do not know what it means. So, please everyone help me. Okey?
2
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1answer
600 views

onomatopoeia: fire going out?

Apparently in Sichuanese a similar term to the English “oops” or “drat” or what have you comes from the sound of a fire going out. It is written 哦呵 (pronounced: o-ho) or 哦呵儿 (pronounced: o-her). Is ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Homeo- or homoeo-?

"Homeo-" seems to be more widely used nowadays to the extent that "homoeo-" is listed as a variant of it, and "homoeostasis" is listed as a variant of "homeostasis". However, there are multiple posts ...
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0answers
60 views

Creativity as a process

I'm struggling with finding an exact match for Russian word "Творчество" which according to Wikipedia is synonymous to the word "Creativity" in English. "Творчество" is defined an activity that yields ...
2
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2answers
167 views

Is “numerate” a verb or only an adjective?

I am at the moment looking into technical English terms used in mathematics. The terminology in fractions (such as 1/8, 2/8 etc.) is that the bottom is called the denominator and the top the ...
6
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1answer
427 views

What's the English equivalent for the Indonesian old saying, “a grill that is far from the fire”?

Jauh panggang dari api in English is a grill that is far from the fire (it's a rough translation). This proverb refers to reality that doesn't fit what you've hoped or a result that doesn't fit what ...
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4answers
1k views

Possession of the matter is the end of the entertainment/fun?

In the Netherlands, where I live, we have a saying: Het bezit van de zaak, is het einde van het vermaak. This roughly translates to: Possession of the matter is the end of the entertainment/fun....
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1answer
28k views

What is the meaning of “here I come”? [closed]

I want to say England I will come to visit you can I use "here I come"?
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1answer
198 views

What does “run the mirror down” mean? [closed]

In Richard Philcox's translation of Frantz Fanon's Black Skin, White Masks, he includes the following sentence: I try to read admiration in the eyes of the other, and if, as luck would have it, ...
6
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3answers
287 views

“If the cedars caught fire, what will the hyssops of the wall say?”

The other day, my mother used a Hebrew expression I hadn't heard before: אִם בְּאֲרָזִים נָפְלָה שַׁלְהֶבֶת מָה יַגִּידוּ אֲזוֹבֵי הַקִּיר It apparently comes from the Talmud, and its literal ...
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2answers
1k views

What do you call the people who live in condominiums?

Here in Brazil the people whe live in condominiums are called "condômino", the people who represent all residents are called "síndico" (syndic). I want to translate "condômino". Thanks.
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4answers
580 views

Are there any English equivalent for the words Mahram and Namahram?

In Islamic religious law there are two words: 1- mahram 2- namahram A woman’s mahram is a person whom she is never permitted to marry because of their close blood relationship (such as her father, ...
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0answers
363 views

Meaning of “write a song” [closed]

Does the verb to write as used in "write a song" refer to only the lyrics (words) or does/can it include the composition of music?
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2answers
754 views

Is there an English expression for a day off for bridging the gap to the weekend?

Coming Thursday (Ascension day) will be a holiday, and I'd like to take the day off on Friday. Like this I'd like to bridge the gap towards the weekend. In Dutch, this is called "making the bridge", ...
0
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1answer
454 views

Is “natural step” a real expression?

In my mother tongue, we sometimes express that the next "Natural step" can be to do something. However, this feels directly translated and not very accurate when expressed in English. Also, a Quick ...
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3answers
173 views

old-fashioned idiom to tell someone to abandon all hope of repeating a certain activity

I'm looking for an idiom that sounds like something someone's grandpa might say. Once again, I'm working on a translation of an English source text that is itself a translation(and I'm pretty ...
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2answers
414 views

He took the bread and “brake” it?

In the King James Version of the Bible, I Corinthians 11:24 says (emphasis mine): And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said, Take, eat: this is my body, which is broken for you: this do ...
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4answers
209 views

What is the English equivalent for the Portuguese expression “ao sabor”?

In Portuguese there's "ao sabor (do/da)", a term/expression that literally translates to "to the taste (of)", example: viajar ao sabor do vento (literally "travelling to the taste of the wind"). In ...
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4answers
436 views

Word / Phrase request for someone who loves to propagate education among others

I am looking for a English word or phrase which suits someone who love to propagate education among people by establishing educational institutions or writing books and so on. In order to translate a ...
5
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1answer
115 views

English-language equivalent for не от хорошей жизни

I am looking for any equivalents/approximations to this Russian expression: не от хорошей жизни ("not from a good life"). This is an expression mostly used as a vague and/or cynical/humorous way to ...
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2answers
106 views

What's the day in/out term for “i receive the payment” [closed]

I'm looking for a good translation for what we, brazilians, call "dar baixa na conta 1234". Basically, it means that "i received the payment for the bill 1234"... I was thinking on "Inform Payment" ...
2
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1answer
443 views

Equivalent of the Spanish phrase “morir de éxito”

In Spanish we have the phrase 'Morir de éxito'. Literally, it translates into 'Die from success' and we use it to refer to some cases in life where a success in something becomes too much of a hassle ...
2
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1answer
147 views

How to translate the german word “Motiv” (= Beweggrund)

I want to translate the german word "Motiv" (with the meaning "Beweggrund") to English. A sentence in english would be People have various ... to do sport What would be the most appropriate ...
2
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1answer
44 views

That will last the life of rats!

This is a French (south of France) expression: "cela va durer la vie des rats". It means "it will last very long". Probably because, in ancient times, rats were very difficultly eradicated so that ...
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2answers
377 views

Is there an English equivalent to the German word “Substanzwissenschaftler”?

As a German statistician, I distinguish between statisticians and "Substanzwissenschaftler" (my best translation so far substantive researchers). While the former know which regression model should be ...
82
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21answers
14k views

English equivalent of the Persian proverb “When there's fire, wet and dry burn together”

There's a well-known proverb in Persian, which, translated literally, goes like this: Where there's fire, wet and dry burn together. The original being ".وقتی آتش موجود باشد) تر و خشک با هم می ...
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1answer
362 views

Meaning of “take care of the dishes”

Does the sentence "take care of the dishes" mean just cleaning them? There's something more implied? Could it mean cleaning the whole kitchen? Context: He cooks and takes care of the dishes.
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2answers
2k views

Is there one word for fat gotten from stress eating (Kummerspeck)?

In German, there is the word Kummerspeck, which literally translates to sorrow lard and means: the fat gained from stress eating Is there such a word in English? I never found any.
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1answer
894 views

Indicate my translation in in-text citation [closed]

I hope I'm not repeating this question although I could not find something relevant on this website. I am looking for a way to indicate that a passage from a book is my translation. I'm using in-text ...
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0answers
525 views

What does mean “elevated digital experience”? [closed]

I see these words on a job board: What is your favorite example of an elevated digital experience, and why? Please provide a URL, if available. What does it mean? Is it the question about some ...
7
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3answers
10k views

What is the name of a business that fixes clothes?

The following local business, which I'm trying to add to Google Maps, fixes clothes by sewing and patching them or changing their hemline. This is a workshop, not a self-service business: The client ...
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1answer
4k views

There are four of us. We are four. Are both ways correct?

I feel like 'There are four of us' is the correct way to say this, I know that 'we are four' is a translation French and Spanish but is it also correct in English?
7
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2answers
2k views

Accepted plural form of “Hijab”

Although hijab is not an English word, it is commonly used in English to describe the head scarf worn by many Moslem women. I was pretty sure I had just heard Christiane Amanpour of CNN call the ...
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1answer
120 views

Wallonia or Walloon Region? [duplicate]

What is the preferred way to refer to la Wallonie in English -- Wallonia or Walloon Region?
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3answers
373 views

Formal expression to say that somebody is now a Doctor of Philosophy

I am trying to translate an expression from my mother tongue into english. A word-by-word "naive" translation would be He was officially proclaimed Doctor of Philosophy of the Department of ...
1
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1answer
165 views

“Vegetable garden” instead of “garden” in a translation [closed]

A Croat author wrote The garden was the mirror of familiy pride, where everything was planted, from flowers to edible fruits. A British English native translated it into English like this: The ...
19
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13answers
6k views

Is there a word for “antro” in English?

I'm looking for a word equivalent to the Spanish word antro. Its definitions are "building frequented by delinquents and people of bad reputation" and "dirty dwelling of bad appearance". Maybe the ...
2
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2answers
620 views

In Early Modern English, is “beest” subjunctive or dialectal?

I am looking for better ways to translate between German and English, and I prefer Early Modern Engliſh, as a mode of speech, but mainly in written form, and I found out the other day that the ...
1
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2answers
378 views

What is the best translation for 'Application Spontanée' (french)

I'm trying to find how I could translate 'Application Spontanée' from french. Is there an expression in english to talk about when you apply at an employer, but without any attached open job offer?
2
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1answer
224 views

Translation from Latin in epigraph [closed]

I would like to use a translated quote from Cicero as an epigraph for my thesis. However I am not sure in which language to write the name of the source: a) English: On the Nature of the Gods b) ...
4
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2answers
717 views

Capitalising names of geographical/tourist terms

I'm translating a series of short tourism-related texts from Croatian to English and I can't find definitive answers for some of my dilemmas: Names of waterfalls / caves / trails & word order ...
2
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4answers
544 views

Translation for “buksi” (Hungarian)

"buksi" in Hungarian is an affectionate form of "head" - usually it's applied to smaller people (typically kids) and creatures with cute features (for example, a puppy or a kitten). This word is in ...