Questions tagged [transitive-verbs]

Questions about verbs that require an object; they are not complete without a direct object.

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22
votes
11answers
3k views

Is there an English transitive verb meaning “to make someone/something valuable”?

I'm thinking something along the lines of "imbue" or "instill", but neither of those words work perfectly unless you append "with value". Ideally this would be a word ...
2
votes
1answer
115 views

Just 'carry' for 'carry weapons' and just 'lift' instead of 'lift weights'. What linguistic phenomenon is it?

There are English verbs that can be used without an object while meaning a certain object. E.g. Carry = carry weapons Lift = lift weights Use = use drugs Possibly, ‘investigate’ (an incident, a crime,...
0
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0answers
36 views

Forgot in this sentence: Transitive or Intransitive?

"Today is Friday, but Adae forgot." Hi everyone, so I encountered this sentence in a writing book . I believe "forgot" in this context is intransitive since there is no object in ...
0
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1answer
204 views

Transitive and Intransitive verbs: is 'eat' transitive in 'Don't eat much'?

I do know the definition of transitive and intransitive verbs. But I have a doubt with respect to a specific example which is as follows: Don't eat much. I want to know whether in this sentence, the ...
2
votes
1answer
126 views

Passive Voice with intransitive verbs?

With a sentence like, "He sat on the couch," is sat still being used as an intransitive verb since, in general, prepositional phrases cannot act as direct objects? To me, the prepositional ...
1
vote
0answers
91 views

Does a direct object always follow the transitive verb?

I am confused as to whether direct objects always follow the transitive verb. When I searched for an explanation online, it always says that direct objects always come after the transitive verb. I can'...
0
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0answers
201 views

Indicate vs Indicates

My question is whether indicate or indicates should be used in the following sentence: The test ids ARB1 and ARB2 indicate(s) that two different samples were used, rather than representing different ...
0
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1answer
35 views

TO and FOR after transitive Verb

In the below two sentences, how intend(verb) has been used? Transitively or Intransitively? Dictionary is saying that it is used as a transitive verb. But my question is there are TO and FOR after the ...
0
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2answers
62 views

“Specialize” as a transitive verb and an antonym for “generalize”

In mathematical writing, I would like to find a transitive verb that means to "apply a general theory to a special case in order to get a theory for this special case". In other words, it ...
1
vote
1answer
98 views

Are the infinitives that follow catenative verbs considered object?

I am confused to find objects of catenative verbs , for example i was looking for the verb refuse and it's transitive and intransitive when i found some examples from oxford dictionary but still not ...
0
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0answers
41 views

Can I use a pure transitive verb as an Intransitive Verb?

Please let me know, whether my following sentences are correct or not? Electrons are generated across the channel. Electrons generate across the channel. Electrons generate an electric field across ...
0
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0answers
196 views

Prepositional phrasal verbs in passive voice

I wanted to clarify the question of prepositional phrasal verbs for myself. I have faced a tricky sentence, and I would like to discover if I can change the location of the preposition 'at'. If not, I ...
0
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1answer
126 views

Confusing incorrect question in my grammar book

The workers _________ $1,000 to plant the trees in the garden. A) paid B) to pay C) paying D) were paid Can you tell me which answer is right and explain why? If here is not the right place for ...
4
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0answers
133 views

Re: Subject + verb (“intended”) + infinitive phrase. Could the phrase function as an adverb (vs. direct object)?

First, to save time and effort, I do understand simple explanations such as this (owl.purdue.edu): We intended to leave early. The infinitive phrase functions as the direct object of the verb ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

Can I use a noun clause introduced by “that” as the direct object of “curse”?

I wrote the following sentence "She cursed that only leaving could cure her." I am aware it sounds odd; I am purely interested in whether it is grammatical. I was told that it is not because "curse" ...
0
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0answers
33 views

The object of a transitive verb

I was simply wondering if the object of a transitive verb can come before the verb? As in "Good luck," the man said to John. Is "good luck" the object of "say" here? Thank you in advance!
0
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0answers
86 views

Using a transitive verb at the end of a sentence

Is it ever appropriate to use a transitive verb at the end of a sentence? Specifically, the sentence that I'm considering is one that ends in "... [someone] will update [a thing] as changes in [other ...
3
votes
1answer
413 views

How did “itch” come to be used to mean “scratch” as in “I had to itch my leg”?

None of the regular sources list itch as a transitive verb meaning to scratch. Yet I hear it used that way in American English all the time. One of the British mods of this site says the usage occurs ...
1
vote
1answer
76 views

'She looked incredible. Then she looked at me'

Am I correct in saying that the verb 'looked' is intransitive in the first phrase, transitive in the second phrase? Is there a name for this type of rhetorical technique playing on the two senses of ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

What part of speech is this “clean” word in the sentence?

To start off with, let me come clean, the Java logging ecosystem is messy. This sentence is quoted from Setting up logging second paragraph. Is the word clean an adverb? Or come is a transitive verb?...
22
votes
3answers
4k views

When to bemoan and when to moan

I've tried looking this up and I've read somewhat unhelpful advice like "to bemoan something is to moan about something". I am mostly aware when one feels correct, and when one does not, but I'm not ...
2
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1answer
1k views

“Say” and “said” as transitive and intransitive verbs

I have an interesting question. Is "say" a transitive verb in the case of direct/reported speech? I understand that it can be a transitive verb in cases like "She said the phrase." or "She says the ...
0
votes
1answer
342 views

Can I use “innovate” as a transitive verb? [closed]

For example, is it OK to say: "We're innovating our device"? Or would I have to say something like "We're innovating in order to change our device"?
1
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2answers
540 views

Does a transitive verb always require a direct object?

If a verb is only listed in the dictionary as a transitive verb, can it be correctly used without a direct object, i.e. as an intransitive verb? We can use the verb "force" as an example, which is ...
1
vote
1answer
125 views

The gerund and its complementation

In what cases does the gerund stemming from a transitive verb take the direct object of that verb and when is a prepositional complement used? For example: Brown's deft painting of his daughter is ...
0
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2answers
14k views

“provide X to someone” vs “provide X for someone”

I am confused by the different explanations in the following two dictionaries. Macmillan says “provide A to B”, while The Free Dictionary says it is wrong and tells us not to say “provide A to B”, ...
1
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2answers
127 views

“impute” as an intransitive verb

I came across a sentence in a Wikipedia article that went like this (MEMRI stands for Middle East Media Research Institute): In 2006, Finkelstein accused MEMRI of editing a television interview he ...
2
votes
2answers
102 views

“receive” is to “send” what “???” is to “scatter”

I am looking for a word in English that is a synonym for receive but is specific for the process of another scattering something to many rather than just sending individually. If one entity sends ...
0
votes
8answers
1k views

How to use “allow to do something” without mentioning a person?

Instead of the probably correct structure: Our software XYZ allows the user to resize and modify PNG images. I'm looking for a way to do it without specifying a person (or people): Our software ...
-1
votes
3answers
323 views

Is “start” used with “fire” as a transitive or an intransitive verb?

Should I say The fire is reported to have started by accident. or The fire is reported to have been started by accident. P.S:Someone told me to use the former because "by accident" implies that no ...
0
votes
2answers
144 views

Transitive verbs without direct objects

My linguistics teacher said the sentence "She put the book on the table." is wrong without 'on the table' part. I disagree with him. Isn't in a sense transitive verbs also intransitive when you speak ...
5
votes
3answers
898 views

Literary devices and sentence structure in Matthew 7:1 (KJV)

I am a student who is looking for help on a specific portion of my discussion. I have been asked the following questions with respect to this KJV verse: Judge not, that ye be not judged. -- ...
3
votes
2answers
365 views

Is “bescumber” transitive or intransitive?

Behold! Did my lawn mower bescumber my neighbor's fence (transitive), or did it bescumber on my neighbor's fence (intransitive)? Or should I switch to passive voice and say my neighbor's fence was ...
2
votes
1answer
132 views

Verb transitivity in sentences with dummy subjects or with prepositions that look like dummy subjects

Suppose we put in play the rule that lay is used transitively and lies is used intransitively. How do you analyze constructions such as – Where the responsibility (lies/lay) has yet to be ...
4
votes
1answer
105 views

Mnemotechnic approach to identifying transitive vs verb-adjective constructs

I'm no linguist, grammarian and not even an english speaker, please bear with me. I'm looking for a quick way to identify transitive vs intransitive constructs, for example, in the sentence "the ...
2
votes
2answers
68 views

Is there a non-prepositional (i.e. more active) verb that captures “X is diminished by Y” where Y is the object of the verb?

I'll give two examples to try to clarify what kind of word I'm looking for. "The water diminishes the fire. The fire is diminished by the water." The water and the fire are set against each other, so ...
2
votes
1answer
103 views

recent use of “to debrief” in AE as an intransitive verb but no dictionary says it can?

The online OED defines to debrief as follows transitive to obtain information from Examples Leonov and Belyaev..will stay at the space station for several days to be debriefed (1965) The online ...
4
votes
3answers
782 views

Transitive use of suicide

To suicide is an intransitive verb meaning “to kill oneself”. I’ve seen it sometime used it transitevly meaning “made to commit suicide” as in the following examples: From “The Enigma of Ralph A. ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Can “procrastinate” be a transitive verb?

I recently read in a book about someone who "procrastinated her tax return", which seemed very strange to me. Is this usage common, and if so is it considered correct?
1
vote
1answer
169 views

Transitivity of the verb “undertake”

It seems obvious that undertake is intransitive in such sentences as undertake to learn to swim State senators undertook to use federal funds for improving schools. To join the club, you have to ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Is “ran” transitive or intransitive in “The boy ran a long distance”? [closed]

The sentence was "The boy ran a long distance." I answered that the verb "ran" was intransitive. Is it correct ?
2
votes
2answers
62 views

Transitive verbs have objects, Intransitive don't. I get it, but how does that help you when you are learning English? [closed]

I'm not asking this in an ignorant way, I'm merely asking how it helps.
7
votes
1answer
158 views

What is it called when I poop the dog?

I'm wondering what it is called when a non-transitive verb is used as a transitive verb. An example would be if someone took the dog outside so it could defecate, and said, I pooped the dog. I ...
8
votes
2answers
165 views

Dropping “it” in America

Before I embraced descriptive grammar it would really grind my gears when I heard, usually from someone with a US American accent, phrases like "I hate when that happens". "Hate is a transitive verb!" ...
1
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0answers
228 views

Is this a complex sentence?

In a comment on a previous post, a member explained to me: that a complex transitive verb (or clause) is defined as one that has a direct object and a complement that specifically relates to the ...
1
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0answers
67 views

screen as an intransitive verb?

Most dictionaries list the verb screen in the sense of showing a movie as a transitive verb, but I have seen the following sentence: 48 hours of movies will screen in the movie theater. Do you think ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Is the colloquial euphemism “to be volunteered” recent?

When someone is forced to volunteer for something, he or she can be said to be volunteered. For example, if a manager asks an employee, could you volunteer to perform task X, then the employee may ...
1
vote
0answers
93 views

Can transitive verbs be further broken down?

Can transitive verbs be further broken down into different types of transitive verbs? For example, I think there are change of state transitive verbs and stative transitive verbs, and was wondering ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

what is the meaning of “ much less”? [closed]

"I could not afford a bicycle much less a car." I wanna know what does this word "much less " mean ?
0
votes
1answer
569 views

to move + plural noun

I'd like to know whether in 'to move countries' the singular could be used instead, and the productivity of this grammatical structure ('to change schools', for example, is grammatical?). Is it ...