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3
votes
1answer
184 views

Losing power in the UK vs US: what's more common?

Which of the following is more common in British English vs American English? Power cut Power outage Power failure Blackout
0
votes
1answer
627 views

Schoolmaster vs Principal or Teacher

As I understand it, the word schoolmaster can either mean a man who teaches in school or one that disciplines or directs. The word schoolmaster can be a synonym of teacher and principal. But which ...
49
votes
5answers
12k views

Why do we say “under the grill”, not “above” or “on” the grill?

I found this sentence in a textbook. It's I cooked the fish slowly on / under the grill. According to the author, the correct answer is under. I also used Google. It turns out that there ...
2
votes
1answer
13k views

at / on/ in (the) (Math) exam

I think it is common to say I did well on the exam in AmE. I did well in the exam in BrE. Which prepositions are suitable for the following situations when we mention the exam we took? ...
12
votes
2answers
50k views

What’s the difference between “tire” and “tyre”?

Basically, everything is in the title. I've seen on the web that tire is US English, while tyre is British English. But then I asked some British friends graduating in Language and Literature, and ...
1
vote
3answers
8k views

Is there a difference between disclude vs exclude? [closed]

I say exclude if I want to prevent inclusion in the first place. I say disclude if I want to express that I remove something that was already previously included (as in its remove from inclusion ...
12
votes
5answers
11k views

The etymology of “redhead” vs. “ginger haired”

All my life I have known people with reddish, orangey hair, to be termed ginger haired. Just as you don't call a blonde a 'yellow head' red head just wasn't a word that was said (wouldn't orange head ...
5
votes
4answers
9k views

Why do Americans seem to use the word “delicious” less often than I do?

I am a foreigner and now I am in America. I always use the word delicious whenever I like food. For example: This meat is so delicious! But one of my friends, who is not a native speaker, once ...
18
votes
3answers
156k views

Which is correct: “I loaned him some money” or “ I lent him some money”?

My Webster's New world Dictionary does not contain the word "loaned" at all, but my Thesaurus does, and the word "lent" is the first synonym listed. My wife, who learned English as a second language ...
9
votes
4answers
17k views

Percent or per cent

How should I choose between writing "percent" and "per cent"? For example: He sold 42 percent of his stock in the company. or He sold 42 per cent of his stock in the company. Are there ...
20
votes
9answers
71k views

What's the difference between “bucket” and “pail”?

What is the difference between bucket and pail? Is there a distinction between the shape of a bucket and the shape of a pail? Are buckets and pails made of different materials? Is there a difference ...
56
votes
5answers
475k views

“Fill out a form” or “fill in a form”

Does one fill out a form or does one fill in a form? I've gotten different answers from the people I've asked. Google search results: fill in a form — 14,200,000 fill out a form — 7,000,000
98
votes
8answers
19k views

Which is correct: “__ is different from __” or “__ is different than __”?

As someone who learned English later on in life, I was taught that different from is the correct grammar to use: this is different from that. However, it seems these days everyone uses different than ...