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Questions tagged [transatlantic-differences]

Differences between how English is used on one side of the Atlantic compared with on the other side; specifically, the difference between Canadian and American English on one side and Irish and British English on the other.

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1answer
47 views

Draft Beer or Draught Beer (In Canada)

There's a few threads on here about draft vs draught, but I couldn't find an answer to my question. As a preface, I'm Canadian, and know that draft (US) and draught (UK) are generally interchangeable,...
0
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1answer
73 views

“hold on I'll put you through” or “hang on I'll put you through”

Hello, this is Melanie Brown from Central Bank. Can I speak to Mr. Clark? Please (hold on / hang on) I'll put you through. Which one - hold on or hang on - is the more appropriate, frequently ...
6
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2answers
361 views

Why are pubowners called landlords in the U.K.?

I just came across the fact that Brits call the owners\operators of their pubs landlords, (on the new show "The Reluctant Landlord"). Being from the USA I am only aware of the term landlord being used ...
4
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1answer
74 views

Young native-speaking males emphasizing deep voices

Recently a possibly new speech pattern has come to my attention and I am wondering whether it is genuine or whether I am mistaken. It is young, male native speakers emphasizing a deep, "rough" voice. ...
3
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4answers
1k views

Is the term Indian Giver politically correct?

My son is Cherokee & uses this term & I was concerned if that is a proper term. I thought it originated because the US government historically gave land & such to tribes, then took it back ...
3
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2answers
617 views

Is the pronunciation difference between “BrE deuce” vs “AmE deuce” systematic?

While checking the exact pronounciation of the term deuce, I noticed that there is a clear difference between BrE /djuːs/ and NAmE /duːs/. While it is true that pronunciation has more exceptions ...
-3
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1answer
225 views

understanding meaning of 'cuttie' [closed]

Urban Dictionary tends to describe the word cuttie in quite sexual way. Is it really the main meaning or the noun can be used normally to name a person / thing which is just cute.
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1answer
927 views

How to name a person from the same country as speaker?

My Slavic language (Slovak) uses the word krajan, speaker can in this way name another person whose origin lies in the same country/land/area/region. English translations I have found: compatriot ...
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3answers
1k views

Insight into the pronunciation of the word algae?

Can anyone provide some insight into the pronunciation of the word algae? Various dictionaries give either the /g/ version as in gear or the /dʒ/ version as in jeep. For example: https://dictionary....
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2answers
86 views

What is an “in honors” school student in the US?

I came across this sentence on an American website Aron is a student in honors in his class I was wondering how to phrase this for a UK audience.
3
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3answers
320 views

The difference between 'purview' and 'remit' (BrE/AmE)?

I noticed, on YouTube, that Trey Gowdy in his congressional confrontations used the word 'purview' but never 'remit'. I could not find 'remit' as a noun in Merriam Webster, only the verb, and wondered ...
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3answers
233 views

Clued-in or clued-up (on something)

Here's what Merriam Webster has to say about clued-up: "British, informal: having a lot of information about the latest developments: He's totally clued up on/about the latest computer ...
10
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6answers
3k views

Is the phrasal verb “buck up” used only in British English, not in American English?

Is the phrasal verb buck up used only in British English? I’ve never heard an American use the word buck up to mean cheer up; I suspect the phrasal verb is only used in British English.
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2answers
380 views

How to distinguish and use the present perfect for the recent past?

I'm having trouble understanding and using the so-called “perfect of recent past” aspect on the present tense. I have three related questions about this which are in bullets, two here and one at the ...
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2answers
56 views

Tuition program: a pondial difference?

I'm under the impression that tuition program in American English refers to a scheme relating to tuition payments, whereas tuition programme in British English means a course or training program. If ...
23
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2answers
10k views

“Closet” vs. “Wardrobe” Why is the first more common in the US?

I believe that speakers on both sides of the pond (i.e. the Atlantic Ocean) are familiar with the terms closet and wardrobe. The first is distinctly American, and the latter is used in the UK. Oxford ...
5
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2answers
171 views

What’s a semi-formal American equivalent for the British expression “value for money”?

I'm searching for an American phrase that would be equivalent to the British “X is great value for money”, one that’s not too colloquial and can be used in a serious product description. I am aware ...
3
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1answer
166 views

Losing power in the UK vs US: what's more common?

Which of the following is more common in British English vs American English? Power cut Power outage Power failure Blackout
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2answers
2k views

UK English: Do y'all use “buzzard” to mean “a contemptible or rapacious person”?

In the US, buzzard denotes vultures, but also a contemptible or rapacious person to use definition 3 from the online Merriam-Webster. The most common phrase I'm personally familiar with is to say you ...
50
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3answers
7k views

How did “biscuit” come to have a distinct meaning in North American English?

The Oxford Living Dictionary makes a clear distinction between the usage of biscuit in Britain and North America: British: A small baked unleavened cake, typically crisp, flat, and sweet. ‘a ...
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1answer
4k views

What's the difference between a hemisphere and a semisphere [closed]

Is there any difference between hemisphere and semisphere?
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2answers
99 views

the verb honour in present-day British and American English [closed]

Is the following use of honor acceptable in British English? The following examples are from American sources; I'm wondering whether they make sense in British English. The soldier honored his ...
71
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8answers
15k views

How can I order eggs “over hard” in the UK?

I've recently made a couple of trips to the London area, and I've had a terrible time trying to convince the hotel breakfast cooks that I want my eggs fried "over hard", meaning that both the white ...
48
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10answers
15k views

Should I say “ATM” or “cashpoint” in the UK?

ATM is an initialism of automated teller machine, coined sometime in the 1970s. I have always considered it an Americanism while its British equivalent has always been cashpoint, Oxford Living ...
3
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1answer
93 views

Can it ever be acceptable to use singular “they” with a specific referent of known but undisclosed gender?

I am not sure whether these two examples using singular they to refer to a specific, singular referent are acceptable in educated speech: I had a friend in Paris, and they had to visit the doctor for ...
13
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2answers
687 views

When did drowning men stop “catching at straws”?

‘grasping at straws’ vs. ‘clutching at straws’ Some sustain that the phrase “grasping at straws” has overtaken that of “clutching at straws”. I read that the former is American while the latter is ...
4
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1answer
574 views

Pronunciation of “priv-” in British English and American English

For example, the pronunciation of "priv-" in the words privacy and private is different in British English. The former is pronounced as prɪv- whereas the latter as praɪv-. Yet, in the US, the ...
16
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4answers
3k views

Why are expressions like “gonna”, “wanna” and “shoulda” American English?

As Etymonline suggests, the use of “a” meaning “have” in expressions like “should have” (shoulda), “could have” (coulda) and “would have” (woulda) were almost standard usage until the 17th century: ...
1
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1answer
209 views

Is there any AmE/BrE difference when describing intermediate colors?

Is there any difference (AmE vs BrE) when describing intermediate colors, that is, pairs of colors to get the color in between? For example: • Red-blue appearance • Reddish-blue appearance • ...
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0answers
82 views

“Have got” in BrE [duplicate]

I'm confused, is "have got" a verb? Because when I've searched it in a dictionary, it said "have got" was an equivalent of "have", the form is like the "Present Perfect Tense", and it is the ...
16
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6answers
6k views

The inquisitive tale of “Nosey Parker”

A nosy parker is someone who doesn't mind their own business. They will poke their noses into other people's affairs, and attempt to eke out whatever information they can, the more personal the better....
2
votes
1answer
7k views

Why do British people pronounce “idea” with an “r” sound at the end? [duplicate]

Non-rhotic dialects tend to drop "r" sounds, so why is one added here when there is no "r" in the word?
18
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2answers
5k views

Why does the term “gondola” refer to BOTH a Venetian canal boat AND an enclosed lift up a mountain? [closed]

The first time I encountered the word “gondola” was as a 20 year old on her first visit to Venice. Gondolas, to me, were written in my memory as a flat, fancy, romantic (and expensive to ride) boat ...
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0answers
406 views

Are there any differences in adjective order between American English and British English? [closed]

What is the difference between English and American in order of adjectives? If there is no difference, please explain how this is known.
1
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1answer
256 views

Word for scold in America [closed]

What do Americans usually use instead of word scold ? For example parents scold their children when they act up . How would write same sentence but with American version of scold?
0
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1answer
562 views

Schoolmaster vs Principal or Teacher

As I understand it, the word schoolmaster can either mean a man who teaches in school or one that disciplines or directs. The word schoolmaster can be a synonym of teacher and principal. But which ...
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2answers
922 views

What are the connotations of “clueless”?

As a result of a discussion with @Hot Licks on another post, it is apparent that his (American) understanding of the nuances associated with clueless is slightly different to my (British) ...
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2answers
2k views

What does 'bespoken' signify, as opposed to 'bespoke'?

The verb bespeak admits two past participles: bespoke and bespoken. I am interested in the attributive usage of these terms. A bespoke suit is one tailored to please and to fit a particular ...
1
vote
2answers
20k views

“Councilor” vs. “Councillor”

Is councilor the spelling used in the U.S., while councillor the spelling used in Canada, UK, and most places internationally? Hilariously, Google will use both councilor and councillor in the same ...
4
votes
2answers
43k views

In training or on training - differences between British and American English?

I would use "on training" as a short form of "on a training course": I'm on training next week. I would use "in training" (or simply "training") for something that is more long term: I'm in ...
2
votes
0answers
971 views

Differences between American and British question intonation?

In interactions with American and British people, I've noted Americans tend to have rise-fall (↗↘) intonation while I've heard the British having rise-fall-rise (↗↘↗) intonation while asking questions....
49
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5answers
11k views

Why do we say “under the grill”, not “above” or “on” the grill?

I found this sentence in a textbook. It's I cooked the fish slowly on / under the grill. According to the author, the correct answer is under. I also used Google. It turns out that there ...
5
votes
4answers
910 views

“Sheltered Housing” in American English?

Sheltered housing is a British English term covering a wide range of rented housing for older and/or disabled or other vulnerable people. -Wikipedia Is there an American equivalent for this kind of ...
2
votes
2answers
5k views

Difference between “everlasting” and “eternal”

I know these two sentences are somehow different, but I don't know how: This is an everlasting love. This is an eternal love. I read here that there are a number of adjectives for ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Why is the 'L' in detailed not doubled?

I cannot quite understand why the 'L' is not doubled when forming 'detailed' from 'detail'. Is that an exemption to the consonant doubling, or did I simply not understand the rules? From the answers ...
23
votes
1answer
1k views

British Mass Nouns versus American Count Nouns

British English often employs mass nouns where American English would only employ count nouns. Count nouns are nouns which take pluralization and numerical quantifiers like 'many'. Mass nouns can't be ...
6
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2answers
630 views

If a “cooking show” is grammatical, why not a “cooking book”?

I enjoy cooking, and I've been told I'm quite a good cook. I have several cookery books 1 at home, mostly on Italian and British cooking, but not one is written by a famous cookery writer 2. I've ...
6
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3answers
307 views

Which words or grammar forms are likely to cause a collision between American and British English?

For all the Mickey-taking on both sides of the water I suppose British and American speakers understand one another 99% of the time. Can anyone think of any areas of vocabulary or grammar where ...
1
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1answer
2k views

Double Consonants in Gerund

Is there any rules regarding gerund that tell when to double the consonant of a word and when not to? I'm a little bit confused regarding this matter. Based on this link there are words that can be ...
2
votes
1answer
598 views

Is “go exercising” ungrammatical or non-standard?

Friends, I think the phrase "go exercise" is spoken in colloquial English. But I can still find the phrase "go exercising," even in Google books. Like the excerpt below: I like to exercise, but ...