Questions tagged [time]

Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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33 views

Word to describe all possibilities after a time period

When describing all amounts above a given number there are plenty of options available, such as: £5000 upwards £5000 and above etc. However, when describing a time span, I'm struggling to come up ...
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1answer
81 views

“The 1800s” versus “the 19th century”?

As a non-native English speaker, who never says "Xth century" in my language, phrases such as: In the late 19th century, they invented a lot of cool stuff! ... always forces me to stop and think ...
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48 views

Using colon in display of numerical time DURATION

What was Jeff's time? +--------+----------------------+ | Person | Time taken (minutes) | +--------+----------------------+ | Jeff | 0:06 | | John | 0:07 | | Peter ...
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32 views

Numeral prefixes of tidal constituents [closed]

If tidal constituents with frequencies of one, two, three, and four cycles per day (respectively, periods of one, a half, a third, and a fourth of a day) were to be termed systematically based on ...
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1answer
39 views

Meaning of 'Within 24 hours they will be shown for a & b times respectively' in this problem:

In a movie theatre two movies 'Avengers' and 'Inception' with running time of 3 & 4 hours respectively and ticket price of 15$ & 25$ respectively will be shown. Within 24 hours they will be ...
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39 views

Is the sentence “Do you know how short 7 minutes IS” grammatically incorrect? [duplicate]

In this video at this time code, two of the various cops say "Do you know how short 7 minutes is?" Is that grammatically incorrect, since "7 minutes" is plural? Or is that just informal language? Or ...
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30 views

To lose by (an event)

Find the probability that you lose by the third toss of the coin. In the given context, a loss would occur directly as a result of the outcome of a toss. For example, you lose if the coin lands tails....
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29 views

“After” clause in Second Conditional

In this sentence: If, in theory, they dedicated more time to working for the good of the country (and themselves), it would be considerably easier to handle the pressure of money debt and be ...
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2answers
61 views

What do you call the 12-24 hour aspect of a timestamp? (not format)

Is there a word to denote whether the timestamp is in 24 hour format or 12 hour format? Programmers usually call it format, but format can apply to the entire timestamp. Wikipedia calls them ...
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56 views

Non-context dependent word choice for “next night” and “previous night”

dear specialists and English-lovers. I have a context-less situation (user in-app interface), with two elements - my task is to give them labels and I'm literally stuck here since I can't google any ...
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1answer
42 views

For a month vs. A month, Past Tense?

What is the difference between these two sentences? My expensive shoes only lasted a month. My expensive shoes only lasted for a month. Could we omit “for“? Does the phrase “a month” always ...
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1answer
226 views

Difference between “per month” and “monthly”

I've referred Is there any difference between “monthly average” and “average per month”? But I want more clearer answer most difference of it. Per Month - I've to pay $100 per month as wages. ...
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197 views

What's the -nym for describing a time of day or a period of time?

We have these... Morning, afternoon, evening, night, day, and it's like night and day Midnight and noon, and high noon Yesterday, today, and tomorrow Earlier, later, and now Four O'Clock 2300 hours ...
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34 views

Placement of Adverbs of Time (“Do you have anything today to do?”)

I understand that usually, adverbs of time are placed at the beginning or the end of a sentence. In the context of this question ("Do you have anything to do?"), can "today" be placed between "...
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40 views

What are all the different ways in which we can refer to time in English?

I am trying to wrap my head around the ways in which we can refer to time in English. The following list is what I have been able to come up with: 1- Tense 2- Auxiliary constructions 3- Temporal ...
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1answer
60 views

Which abbreviation to use for the current observed time in Central Europe?

When I talk to colleagues I want to write "Let's meet 10am London / 11am Europe", but I want to use an abbreviation. I used to write "10am GMT / 11am CET". But if it were daylight savings time this ...
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2answers
43 views

Date and time on one line

How does one display a date and a time on one line? Example: Sep 25, 2019 20:59 How would this be displayed on one line? Adding another , after 2019 does not look/feel right to me. Is there a rule?
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2answers
64 views

What word can I use to imply that one has almost 'travelled in time' to see past results?

I have a set of sales data. This data has information for orders confirmed on or before "x" date. But there is also a date for the delivery of the goods. We are targeted each month not on orders ...
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1answer
57 views

How to correctly say time in English?

This is my first question on this website! I want to say something like "The meeting will be held at 9:30 in the morning of Sep 12, 2019." and "I will be on a travelling business in Sep 30, 2019." ...
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2answers
2k views

Thank God it's Friday, tomorrow is THE weekend. Why the definite article?

Today is Friday. Tomorrow is the weekend. In terms of grammar, how is the definite article justified there? We say: It's noon. It's 12 o'clock. It's August. It's 2019. But we also ...
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1answer
64 views

When to drop AD and BC from dates?

I see some texts using AD and BC or BCE and CE. But other texts just have the date, like 1992 and it is understood. Is there a rule of thumb for when to add these prefixes? I'm using Chicago-Turabian.
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1answer
34 views

Frequency/quantity in a/one month

Please consider the following: There are four seasons IN a year I do it five times IN a year The girls meet me twice a month He smoked five cigarettes IN a day They finish five books a ...
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4answers
180 views

What time are we talking about in “She’ll have bought a new mobile/cellphone yesterday”?

I encountered this sentence when I was learning another language. I have never used such a sentence in English nor seen one, but it seems it exists. What idea does this sentence trying to convey? ...
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1answer
80 views

Can present perfect tense be used with the adverb “earlier”?

I would like to know if the present perfect construction can be used in the two following sentences that employ the adverb earlier: As I have said earlier, I don't like her at all. I have been to ...
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1answer
91 views

Since and for, where can they be omitted?

I’m well aware of the difference between ‘since’ and ‘for’. However I have a question. Imagine I say ‘I’ve been working on the essay since Saturday’ or ‘I’ve been working on the essay for two days’. ...
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1answer
27 views

At one time operating vs At one time it operated

Since "at one time" is a time indicator, shouldn't the gerund "operating" be equivalent, while giving a better flow joining sentences? Or is it more confusing/improper? Preceding text of the same ...
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143 views

19 April 12pm - What time is it? Is 12:00pm this day the same as 00:00am tomorrow? [duplicate]

English is not my native language and I am confused when writing about midnight of some day. I am mostly using 24h-format on every day basic, so I want to make sure how to use 12h-format properly. ...
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3answers
470 views

Is there a difference in meaning between “I'll be there for 7pm” and “I'll be there at 7pm”?

I feel like "for 7pm" is possibly colloquial and perhaps not quite Standard English, but I have heard it a lot. I can't think if there's any difference in meaning between "I'll be there for 7" and "I'...
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1answer
36 views

Is it wrong to use “How much passed” without time?

Is it correct to say "I noticed how much passed since we connected." Would one deduce time by reading this? Or you have to specify "time" after much?
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1answer
64 views

Present Perfect and Reichenbach's model of tense

I recently came across the following construction in some documentation I was reading: This document describes a solution that has been applied during the migration. To me, this seemed utterly ...
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2answers
288 views

How to say my meetings have caused cascading delay

What is another way to say to co-workers that my previous meeting took longer than expected (and hence I am late for the current meeting). and what is the business and also day to day common phrase(...
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2answers
97 views

Unambiguous word for last in chronological order

Here's the scenario, I want to list all of a customer's appointments, ending with the "last" one, regardless of whether that was in the past or scheduled for the future. I have come up with a few ...
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1answer
43 views

time expressions

Is it correct to use 'hardly ever' at the beginning or the end of a sentence? for example is it right to say: Hardly ever, my parents help me with homework / my parents help me with homework hardly ...
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1answer
26 views

“when” + present perfect, “when” + present continuous

Is it grammatically correct to say I remember that there were two memorable times when I have helped people Also I would like to talk about my experience when I was pursuing my master degree
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1answer
70 views

Pay for something in a period of time [closed]

I write an essay and need to use the phrase like: He will pay for a laptop in ten years (I suppose he borrowed money, but I don’t want to use “pay back”) Question: should we use “in” preposition?...
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1answer
44 views

Every/All person/people 's time

We have 10 people. We assign a time interval to each one. For example, they could live 1 year, 2 years,... 10 years. And I want to calculate the sum of all their times. What's the proper way to tell ...
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1answer
698 views

Which one is the correct answer : “What do you do on Saturdays?” or “What time do you take your dog for a walk on Saturday?”

Which of these questions is correct for "I take the dog for a walk every Saturday afternoon." : a) What time do you take your dog for a walk on Saturday? b) What do you do on Saturdays thank you
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4answers
231 views

I am looking for a word in English that means something specific about the immediate present

I'm doing research on manufacturing systems and throughout my papers I need to refer to events as they approach a line t=0 which is, to within a differential slice of time, the exact present between ...
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2answers
102 views

The train just arrived at platform six is the delayed 13.15 from Hereford

The train just arrived at platform six is the delayed 13.15 from Hereford. Q; In the above sentence, I assume "13.15" means hour and minute. But do you think writing hour and minute like this ...
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1answer
3k views

Word for “Change Over Time”

I am a ornithologist working in Japan and I'm trying to translate a Japanese word, "経年" "けいねん" pronounced "ke i nen", which means change over time or aging but since my English skills are not where ...
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3answers
142 views

Need a good word for “parts of the day”

Does anyone know an alternative (smarter) word for "parts of the day" ? examples: afternoon, dusk, evening, morning, night, et cetera My problem is I'm writing a form where I would like to ask what ...
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6answers
2k views

How do I express a time point which is a decade ago, counting from another time point mentioned in a passage?

E.g., I would like to say X was almost impossible to be used in research until 2000s despite being invented a decade ago In this sentence, I would like to express that X was invented in 1990s. ...
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3answers
557 views

It's time we had a talk

I have a misunderstanding with one question. This phrase was said in the present moment, not about the past. That's why I'm confused. "It's time we had a talk" I suppose there is the Present Perfect ...
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1answer
16k views

“All this time” or “All these time”?

Is "time" plural in the expressions "all the time" and "all these time"? Which is correct? The first result I get on Google states that the latter is not idiomatic, but apparently "all these moments"...
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2answers
73 views

Is there a better way to say “since the hour last changed”?

I am looking for a better, possibly idiomatic, phrase to describe the place in time "since the hour last changed". A simplistic example: if the time was 6.31pm, it would be thirty-one minutes since ...
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3answers
4k views

Is there a word that means “measure time”?

You can measure the weight – it is called weighing. If you measure time, what is that called? Is there a single English word for this? I'm thinking especially in the context of measuring the ...
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1answer
706 views

How to use “for the first and only time”

Could I say the following: It was for the first time and maybe even the last (time). ? Does this sentence make any sense? As it does in my native language, I'm not sure about English.
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3answers
97 views

How do I say “here” in time?

I am here. conveys spatial information. How would I say the same about temporal information? Say I were a time traveller, and to specify that someone/something is not “here” - in time.
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1answer
59 views

Further to refer to time [closed]

May I use further to refer to time? For instance: I'll do it further Thank you
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2answers
20k views

Which one is correct? “I am suffering from fever since yesterday” or “I am suffering from fever from yesterday”?

I am not good in English literature. From daily use of English language, it seems to me that the second from in: 1 I am suffering from fever from yesterday is the correct word. But, my friend, a ...

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