Questions tagged [time]

Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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30 views

When and while for places

Is it correct to say 'When I was in London I had my own car'? OR Should we say 'While I was in London I had my own car?
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4answers
152 views

What time are we talking about in “She’ll have bought a new mobile/cellphone yesterday”?

I encountered this sentence when I was learning another language. I have never used such a sentence in English nor seen one, but it seems it exists. What idea does this sentence trying to convey? ...
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1answer
78 views

Since and for, where can they be omitted?

I’m well aware of the difference between ‘since’ and ‘for’. However I have a question. Imagine I say ‘I’ve been working on the essay since Saturday’ or ‘I’ve been working on the essay for two days’. ...
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1answer
24 views

At one time operating vs At one time it operated

Since "at one time" is a time indicator, shouldn't the gerund "operating" be equivalent, while giving a better flow joining sentences? Or is it more confusing/improper? Preceding text of the same ...
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54 views

19 April 12pm - What time is it? Is 12:00pm this day the same as 00:00am tomorrow? [duplicate]

English is not my native language and I am confused when writing about midnight of some day. I am mostly using 24h-format on every day basic, so I want to make sure how to use 12h-format properly. ...
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3answers
74 views

Is there a difference in meaning between “I'll be there for 7pm” and “I'll be there at 7pm”?

I feel like "for 7pm" is possibly colloquial and perhaps not quite Standard English, but I have heard it a lot. I can't think if there's any difference in meaning between "I'll be there for 7" and "I'...
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1answer
35 views

Is it wrong to use “How much passed” without time?

Is it correct to say "I noticed how much passed since we connected." Would one deduce time by reading this? Or you have to specify "time" after much?
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1answer
33 views

Present Perfect and Reichenbach's model of tense

I recently came across the following construction in some documentation I was reading: This document describes a solution that has been applied during the migration. To me, this seemed utterly ...
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2answers
61 views

How to say my meetings have caused cascading delay

What is another way to say to co-workers that my previous meeting took longer than expected (and hence I am late for the current meeting). and what is the business and also day to day common phrase(...
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2answers
78 views

Unambiguous word for last in chronological order

Here's the scenario, I want to list all of a customer's appointments, ending with the "last" one, regardless of whether that was in the past or scheduled for the future. I have come up with a few ...
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1answer
32 views

time expressions

Is it correct to use 'hardly ever' at the beginning or the end of a sentence? for example is it right to say: Hardly ever, my parents help me with homework / my parents help me with homework hardly ...
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23 views

“when” + present perfect, “when” + present continuous

Is it grammatically correct to say I remember that there were two memorable times when I have helped people Also I would like to talk about my experience when I was pursuing my master degree
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53 views

Pay for something in a period of time [closed]

I write an essay and need to use the phrase like: He will pay for a laptop in ten years (I suppose he borrowed money, but I don’t want to use “pay back”) Question: should we use “in” preposition?...
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1answer
32 views

Every/All person/people 's time

We have 10 people. We assign a time interval to each one. For example, they could live 1 year, 2 years,... 10 years. And I want to calculate the sum of all their times. What's the proper way to tell ...
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1answer
377 views

Which one is the correct answer : “What do you do on Saturdays?” or “What time do you take your dog for a walk on Saturday?”

Which of these questions is correct for "I take the dog for a walk every Saturday afternoon." : a) What time do you take your dog for a walk on Saturday? b) What do you do on Saturdays thank you
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4answers
150 views

I am looking for a word in English that means something specific about the immediate present

I'm doing research on manufacturing systems and throughout my papers I need to refer to events as they approach a line t=0 which is, to within a differential slice of time, the exact present between ...
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2answers
85 views

The train just arrived at platform six is the delayed 13.15 from Hereford

The train just arrived at platform six is the delayed 13.15 from Hereford. Q; In the above sentence, I assume "13.15" means hour and minute. But do you think writing hour and minute like this ...
2
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1answer
1k views

Word for “Change Over Time”

I am a ornithologist working in Japan and I'm trying to translate a Japanese word, "経年" "けいねん" pronounced "ke i nen", which means change over time or aging but since my English skills are not where ...
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3answers
97 views

Need a good word for “parts of the day”

Does anyone know an alternative (smarter) word for "parts of the day" ? examples: afternoon, dusk, evening, morning, night, et cetera My problem is I'm writing a form where I would like to ask what ...
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6answers
2k views

How do I express a time point which is a decade ago, counting from another time point mentioned in a passage?

E.g., I would like to say X was almost impossible to be used in research until 2000s despite being invented a decade ago In this sentence, I would like to express that X was invented in 1990s. ...
6
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3answers
172 views

It's time we had a talk

I have a misunderstanding with one question. This phrase was said in the present moment, not about the past. That's why I'm confused. "It's time we had a talk" I suppose there is the Present Perfect ...
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1answer
8k views

“All this time” or “All these time”?

Is "time" plural in the expressions "all the time" and "all these time"? Which is correct? The first result I get on Google states that the latter is not idiomatic, but apparently "all these moments"...
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2answers
67 views

Is there a better way to say “since the hour last changed”?

I am looking for a better, possibly idiomatic, phrase to describe the place in time "since the hour last changed". A simplistic example: if the time was 6.31pm, it would be thirty-one minutes since ...
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3answers
4k views

Is there a word that means “measure time”?

You can measure the weight – it is called weighing. If you measure time, what is that called? Is there a single English word for this? I'm thinking especially in the context of measuring the ...
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1answer
314 views

How to use “for the first and only time”

Could I say the following: It was for the first time and maybe even the last (time). ? Does this sentence make any sense? As it does in my native language, I'm not sure about English.
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How do I say “here” in time?

I am here. conveys spatial information. How would I say the same about temporal information? Say I were a time traveller, and to specify that someone/something is not “here” - in time.
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47 views

Further to refer to time [closed]

May I use further to refer to time? For instance: I'll do it further Thank you
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2answers
9k views

Which one is correct? “I am suffering from fever since yesterday” or “I am suffering from fever from yesterday”?

I am not good in English literature. From daily use of English language, it seems to me that the second from in: 1 I am suffering from fever from yesterday is the correct word. But, my friend, a ...
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3answers
132 views

Word for each component of a time-stamp

If I have been presented with a time-stamp in the 24-hour format: 12:24:33 (hh:mm:ss) Is there a word to address a component of this? By a component, I mean each value between 2 delimiters (only the ...
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1answer
45 views

Changes in Time Range

I'm looking for an unambiguous wording for the "changed" term for these scenarios: I've a time range from August 6th to August 10th. A: I'm changing this time range to August 13th to August 17th B: ...
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1answer
96 views

Naming convention for weeks

We have names for days in a week and for months in a year, but does a convention exist for weeks in the month? Alternatively, do we have names for weeks in the year other than, say, "The 34th week of ...
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1answer
56 views

Alternatives for “expected as of today”

Could someone of the Native speakers assist with the following? I need to find the best and the shortest expression for a time reporting software. The expression I am really stuck at: "(Work hours) ...
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1answer
156 views

It's about time (vs) It's a matter of time

I would like to know if there is a difference in usage between these 2 structures. In other words what situations might suit one and not the other? It's about time. It's a matter of time.
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67 views

Can the word “presently” be used to refer to the present (modern) time? [closed]

I have a feeling that the word presently should not be used in the way I've been using it, so I'm wondering whether the following sentence is right: That ancient idea has presently been defined.
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2answers
124 views

Word to denote “recent” in a relative timeframe

I'm looking for a word to replace recent when the reference point is not the present. For example, I want to describe the time/events of the period shortly before the rule of Alfred the Great (what ...
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1answer
179 views

The match now starts next Monday

I cannot find an appropriate paraphrase for the next sentence, from Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, pag. 133. The match now starts next Monday, not Tuesday, as I said in my last letter. ...
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2answers
230 views

using past tense for the future - is it correct?

In the show Westworld, Anthony Hopkins uses this structure, as: As soon as Dr.Ford left the room, he would put an end to this nightmare. now the question is, shouldn't the sentence be like: As ...
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1answer
200 views

Can we have inversion with temporal expressions?

Is it correct to say: "On Friday is a concert at Trafalgar Square." or do we have to say: "On Friday there is a concert at Trafalgar Square." I know that inversion can occur with locative ...
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1answer
587 views

“away for a weeks” or “away till 1 week”

I want to tell someone that Situation: "I need to give a reasonable reason to schedule meeting trip in this week because my family is not with me for this week." then which is a correct and right ...
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2answers
75 views

Word which refers to a Position and Timestamp pair [duplicate]

I'm trying to find a term that refers to both a position and a timestamp associated with that position. "Position in time" is a common phrase. Are there more technical terms? A position and timestamp ...
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2answers
5k views

“she was gone” vs “she had gone”

I know when Past perfect, and when two past verbs are used in a sentence. according to what I have read, when two actions or events have taken place in rapid succession, we use two verbs in the past ...
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0answers
28 views

Use of “day of”, “then”, and “closer to” as an adverb

Suppose you're coordinating an event with friends. Someone might say any of the following: Let's sync up day of. Let's sync up then. Let's sync up closer to. I have a few questions: I hear (1) and (...
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1answer
901 views

Expressions of time: “…by the time” vs “…the moment”

I phoned her_____ I heard the news. minute during by the time the moment I know that correct answer is "the moment"; yet I don't comprehend why it is right answer. Can we ...
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4answers
109 views

What could be the possible noun of the time between the minimum and maximum?

Fellow Anglophones, I'm developing a Timer App and I have a trouble thinking in what could be the appropriate noun for this time. Right now, I'm using the expression Average Time. However, I don't ...
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1answer
77 views

Counting time: Is it relevant? [closed]

When does BCE begin and why then? It seems arbitrary and possibly prejudicial or anti-prejudicial. Also confusing to the reader who may be culturally acquainted with BC and AD.
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1answer
112 views

Better sentence for 'lets go for this time"? [closed]

I am in conversation with another person to set up a meeting time. He suggested some time to me and asks me suitability of that time for me. I am good at that time. Below is what I have written to him ...
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2answers
203 views

Need alternative phrases to “calendar week” and “calendar month”

We may be familiar with the terms "calendar month" and "lunar month". The former refers specifically to a month as it begins and ends on the calendar. The latter, by contrast, refers to the span of ...
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1answer
30 views

Representing the time of day

If you apply after 1200 hr (Monday to Friday), or on Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays, you can collect your cashier's order after 1200 hr on the next business day. Dear users, I saw the above ...
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1answer
1k views

Homework till/on/for Monday [closed]

Could you explain to me the difference between these variants? Could there be more of them? What is a good guide (not a note-ish article) to use the correct prepositions with nouns of time? Thank you ...
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1answer
603 views

for vs over (in time span)

I wonder if "for 50 years" has the same meaning with "over 50 years" ? Anyone who can help is highly appreciated.