Questions tagged [time]

Topics related to time in written or spoken English

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Is it correct "I have been reading the book three hours."? [migrated]

Compare the two sentences below: A: I have been reading the book for three hours. B: I have been reading the book three hours. I know A is obviously correct. But my question is: Is B also correct? ...
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Is there a right way to interpret a phrase that involves time ex: 'in the last 1 week' or is it always subjective?

If today is 8th April 2022, what is the right interpretation of the term 'in the last 1 week'? Is it ? 28th March to 3rd April 1st April to 7th April 27th March to 2nd April Is there a framework of ...
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2 answers
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Does "by year X" include year X?

A politician promises to, say, plant 1,000 trees "by 2022". Will one be able to tell if the promise was fulfilled on January 1, 2022 or on January 1, 2023?
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When should the program greet with good evening and good night? [duplicate]

I want to create a program that will greet users with good morning, good afternoon, good evening and good night. However, I am confused as to when the time should be used to greet with good evening ...
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-1 votes
1 answer
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"An interview at the suggested [insert word here]" – time? moment? occasion? opportunity? juncture?

I am looking for a word that means, a particular date and time. I need it to complete the following phrase: An interview at the suggested ____ . Time is the most obvious, but it lacks the date ...
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Days from date count [duplicate]

If someone says, You have four days from February 4th, 2022 to complete this job what is the due date to complete the job? is it 7th February or 8th February?
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What is the proper way to say 01:32? [closed]

During Apollo 11 launch the narrator said "thirty two minutes past the hour". I always thought it meant 01:32. But here another person claims that phrase could refer to 32 minutes past any ...
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Present Perfect in the past time context

I have come across this paragraph in an English textbook: Does this ring a bell? I'm sure it does. We've all experienced annoying tricks when we were young – the brother who stole your toys and then ...
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How to avoid poor flow in these sentences with "divorced his wife" and "divorced his ex-wife"?

Consider the sentence He had been living in the city ever since he divorced his ex-wife. and the alternative He had been living in the city ever since he divorced his wife. Both have imperfect ...
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'Times' vs 'x' for Numeric Data Displaying [closed]

While I believe either may be grammatically correct, I'm writing a formal report where I need to say something 'reduced time by an average of 42 times' I can't tell in this case whether using '42 ...
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"under the ten minutes" vs "under ten minutes"

By the end of Chapter 5 of The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle, there is a usage that I have never seen before: "under the ten minutes". The context: Until we got three-...
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Idiom or phrase for expressing one's skill/talent has not decayed

I am wondering what standard phrase or idiom expresses that one's skill or talent in a particular area has not decayed through the passage of time. I believe a related idiom is, "[the person] has ...
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How to refer to an event happening without referring to when it's happening? [duplicate]

I can say that an event will happen, or has happened, or is happening. But is there a way to say that an event exists in the time line without referring to WHEN it is placed? For example, I can say I ...
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2 answers
204 views

Over the next 2 weeks [closed]

I need to clarify the time mentioned in this sentence: Can you please provide me a few dates and times that will suit you over the next 2-3 weeks? So the dates mentioned should be any day from now ...
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How to make these sentences passive: 'People believe that Jenkins is the culprit.' and 'People believed that Jenkins was the culprit.' [closed]

How to make these sentences passive? 'People believe that Jenkins was the culprit.' and 'People believed that Jenkins was the culprit.' I know it is Jenkins is believed to have been the culprit. ...
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Using more than one past perfect tense with time clauses and "last time I..."

I know I can express things in many different ways, and that maybe I could find alternative ways to form the sentences below, but I'm just trying to understand the use of the past perfect in certain ...
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Is "during the period of..." acceptable?

I am not a native speaker and am looking for an accurate wording: During the period of 09/10/2021 - 09/20/2021, our department has run an assessment test of graduate students. I am concerned if the &...
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Is there an equiv­a­lent of “nych­the­meron” that specif­i­cally starts at mid­night?

That is, is there a word for the 24-hour pe­riod start­ing at mid­night? I know that tech­ni­cally a day means ei­ther 24 hours or the pe­riod of time be­tween sun­rise and sun­set, and that day and ...
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When talking about a historical civilization/event that continues today, how do you write the "end" dates? [duplicate]

Let's say I'm talking about the duration of Hinduism - I've taken the "beginning" date as the 19th century BC, so I've currently written: (19th century BC - ) I don't know if there is a ...
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Does "first day/time-slot" refer to Monday and not Friday?

I've had my professor's text, as follows: Select which you would like to come to: the first (= Class A) or second (= Class B) day/time-slot available on your weekly schedule. Here is the question. I ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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How does the word "today" make sense?

So I'm currently reading a book from the 1930s (Lost Horizon), where some language conventions are quite different than the language conventions I am used to today. One thing piqued my interest: The ...
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"a certain event will occur by a" particular "period of time" means that said event can occur at any instant of time within said "period of time" [duplicate]

In English, if a person states, "a certain event will occur by a" particular "period of time" then does that mean that said event will occur any time within said "period of ...
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Difference between to and until? [duplicate]

I'd love to know what the difference is between "to" and "until" when talking about time. Consider the following examples: (taken from an actual travel guide) Wild flowers grow in ...
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Using the word "minutes" when saying the time

I have a question regarding the word "minutes" used in the context of telling someone what time it is. Actually, I think there may be regional differences, and, therefore, I have not one but ...
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when I stopped eating red meat for 3 months, I was iron deficient , since I didn't have enough veggies either or since I didn't had enough veggies? [duplicate]

I always get confused about ​[ Asking if he has already had his dinner] did you had your dinner? did you have your dinner? Have you had your dinner? I was iron deficient , since I didn't have (as in ...
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Timing of adverb after conditional

The sentence in question: Should you decide to decline the offer, the contract is terminated effective immediately. My question is about the timing of the word immediately. Would immediately refer to ...
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place-place-time

Could you please tell me which one of the following sentences is correct grammatically? I am giving a talk at the International Congress on Mathematical Physics in Berlin, Germany, in July 2021. I ...
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Compact writing of "1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36-month survival was analysed"

I have an academic paper abstract to write and it has very limited word count (150 words). I have to say that we analysed 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24 and 36-month survival of the included patients in this ...
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'At a time' or 'in a time'

In the phrase The quantity of insects in/at a time t is given by i(t). What is the correct? Thank you so much!
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time expression for hour ending in 00? [duplicate]

I have the following case: "This will be triggered from hour to hour". So if it is 9:32 the trigger will activate on 10:32. My question is: If I want to say from hour to hour BUT I want to ...
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An old-fashioned way of reading the time

My elderly grandmother, before she passed away, had a very distinct way of reading the time. It has been quite some time since she passed away and I can't quite remember the exact phrasing she used ...
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Ambiguous preposition of time

I am learning English, and would like to know if this sentence means A or B: I knew that you went there yesterday. A. You went there, and I knew it yesterday. B. You went there yesterday, and I knew ...
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2 answers
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"By the year XXXX" means "before the year XXXX", right?

In this Wikipedia article I found the following sentence: By 1959, discrete transistors were considered sufficiently reliable (...) But "by 1959" means "not later than 1959", or &...
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How to say "consecutive", but not necessarily one immediately after the other?

I have some event that happens e.g., every year. I see that there is some strong correlation between the properties of events that occurred in the past, and those that occur in the future. I want to ...
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2 votes
2 answers
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Hypernym for words that refer to a specific point in time like now, today, tomorrow, and yesterday

Second, minute, hour, ... all fall under 'duration' But when you want to refer to a specific point in time, like 'now' or 'yesterday' (many languages go way further and have single words for 'next/...
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Clock-related terms starting with "C" and "F" [closed]

Are there any clock-related terms starting with "C" and "F"? I have a pocket watch with these letters at the bottom, see the picture. Here I found more examples: https://i....
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If 'pre' is previous, 'post' is after, and 'peri' is current, what is "initiation"?

In chronology: pre-event, ?-event, peri-event, post-event Maybe "ini-event" from Latin "initium"?
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Is "set some time on the side" a common phrase?

I was convinced set some time on the side was a correct, fairly common expression. However, I am now in doubt because I can't find it via Google phrase match search. Is it idiomatic English? For ...
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How can I express the fact that the reason why I wore pants has been the same?

Since the start of the latest lockdowns, I haven't been wearing pants often. The only times when I wear it have been when I meet with a particular friend of mine. Now, I want to express the fact that ...
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Idiom for up-front time investment

Suppose I do something that might be seen as an immediate waste of time, because I think it will save more time in the long-term, be it preventing problems, by solving them faster, or by making future ...
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What verb construction would you use?

Imagine you go down to the station at noon to meet your friend Mike there. You sit there and wait and wait for him to show up. Two hours later your friend finally arrives and says to you: Sorry I'm ...
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Saying a period of time of -ties (ex: the 80s to 90s) for a research paper correctly

I'm trying to write a sentence that mentions a specific period of time, though I'm not sure if I wrote it correctly or not. Here's what I have. We have succeeded in the era of the 1960s to 1980s ...
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1 answer
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When is it necessary or preferable to use 'in the' before a time period? [duplicate]

When is it necessary or preferable to use 'in the' before a time period? Is one sentence more formal? Does the length of time matter? Example 1: He was born last century. Example 1a: He was born in ...
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2 votes
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Writing Time at the Beginning of a Sentence

I'm a court reporter and can't move words around. Writing out "Three o'clock" at the beginning of a sentence is a given. What to do when the time is 3:01? And the zero creates an ...
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Which prepositions should I need to use when giving an exact time and location?

Which prepositions should I need to use when giving an exact time and location? For example, I want to say the meeting time is 11:32 and the location is Blah, and both are exact locations and time, so ...
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past or passed?

Please help choose: past or passed. The newly-crowned first king of Italy announced, "The time of the Roman Empire is _____." (Please pretend the king spoke English.) I'm writing a ...
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Time or timing?

Which of these sentences is correct? I'm not sure of the reason why: I think Summer is the best timing to do this I think Summer is the best time to do this
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2 votes
1 answer
383 views

"At the beginning" or "during the beginning"?

Are both expressions below valid and equivalent? "At the beginning …" "During the beginning …" "During the beginning …" seems wrong to me.
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1 answer
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The Passive Voice when referring to time [duplicate]

If we say something like "More than two months have passed", would you say this is speaking in the Passive Voice? When you look at the general rules about when to use the Passive Voice, it ...
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2 answers
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How to clarify what you mean by "Standard Time" in relation to time zones?

It seems like the term "Standard Time" in the context of describing a time zone is ambiguous. For example "Pacific Standard Time" could either mean: As distinct from "...
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