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Topics related to time in written or spoken English

-2
votes
1answer
36 views

Changes in Time Range

I'm looking for an unambiguous wording for the "changed" term for these scenarios: I've a time range from August 6th to August 10th. A: I'm changing this time range to August 13th to August 17th B: ...
1
vote
1answer
52 views

Naming convention for weeks

We have names for days in a week and for months in a year, but does a convention exist for weeks in the month? Alternatively, do we have names for weeks in the year other than, say, "The 34th week of ...
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Alternatives for “expected as of today”

Could someone of the Native speakers assist with the following? I need to find the best and the shortest expression for a time reporting software. The expression I am really stuck at: "(Work hours) ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

It's about time (vs) It's a matter of time

I would like to know if there is a difference in usage between these 2 structures. In other words what situations might suit one and not the other? It's about time. It's a matter of time.
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Do I need a comma in a sentence that starts with “Three years later…” [duplicate]

Do I need a comma after 'later'? Three years later, my grandfather's health started to deteriorate due to dementia.
-1
votes
1answer
35 views

Can the word “presently” be used to refer to the present (modern) time? [closed]

I have a feeling that the word presently should not be used in the way I've been using it, so I'm wondering whether the following sentence is right: That ancient idea has presently been defined.
1
vote
2answers
86 views

Word to denote “recent” in a relative timeframe

I'm looking for a word to replace recent when the reference point is not the present. For example, I want to describe the time/events of the period shortly before the rule of Alfred the Great (what ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

The match now starts next Monday

I cannot find an appropriate paraphrase for the next sentence, from Cambridge Grammar of the English Language, pag. 133. The match now starts next Monday, not Tuesday, as I said in my last letter. ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Figurative Language concerning time

I'm writing an essay on 'How Do I Love Thee?' by Elizabeth Browning: Now, I want to reference how Browning uses referencing a long stretch of time to represent her love for her fiance, Robert ...
0
votes
1answer
81 views

using past tense for the future - is it correct?

In the show Westworld, Anthony Hopkins uses this structure, as: As soon as Dr.Ford left the room, he would put an end to this nightmare. now the question is, shouldn't the sentence be like: As ...
7
votes
1answer
187 views

Can we have inversion with temporal expressions?

Is it correct to say: "On Friday is a concert at Trafalgar Square." or do we have to say: "On Friday there is a concert at Trafalgar Square." I know that inversion can occur with locative ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

“away for a weeks” or “away till 1 week”

I want to tell someone that Situation: "I need to give a reasonable reason to schedule meeting trip in this week because my family is not with me for this week." then which is a correct and right ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

Word which refers to a Position and Timestamp pair [duplicate]

I'm trying to find a term that refers to both a position and a timestamp associated with that position. "Position in time" is a common phrase. Are there more technical terms? A position and timestamp ...
1
vote
2answers
303 views

“she was gone” vs “she had gone”

I know when Past perfect, and when two past verbs are used in a sentence. according to what I have read, when two actions or events have taken place in rapid succession, we use two verbs in the past ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Use of “day of”, “then”, and “closer to” as an adverb

Suppose you're coordinating an event with friends. Someone might say any of the following: Let's sync up day of. Let's sync up then. Let's sync up closer to. I have a few questions: I hear (1) and (...
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Expressions of time: “…by the time” vs “…the moment”

I phoned her_____ I heard the news. minute during by the time the moment I know that correct answer is "the moment"; yet I don't comprehend why it is right answer. Can we ...
-1
votes
4answers
82 views

What could be the possible noun of the time between the minimum and maximum?

Fellow Anglophones, I'm developing a Timer App and I have a trouble thinking in what could be the appropriate noun for this time. Right now, I'm using the expression Average Time. However, I don't ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Counting time: Is it relevant? [closed]

When does BCE begin and why then? It seems arbitrary and possibly prejudicial or anti-prejudicial. Also confusing to the reader who may be culturally acquainted with BC and AD.
0
votes
1answer
41 views

Better sentence for 'lets go for this time"? [closed]

I am in conversation with another person to set up a meeting time. He suggested some time to me and asks me suitability of that time for me. I am good at that time. Below is what I have written to him ...
0
votes
2answers
78 views

Need alternative phrases to “calendar week” and “calendar month”

We may be familiar with the terms "calendar month" and "lunar month". The former refers specifically to a month as it begins and ends on the calendar. The latter, by contrast, refers to the span of ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Representing the time of day

If you apply after 1200 hr (Monday to Friday), or on Saturdays, Sundays and Public Holidays, you can collect your cashier's order after 1200 hr on the next business day. Dear users, I saw the above ...
0
votes
0answers
54 views

Is it “quarter past six” or “*a* quarter past six”?

Question is in the title. More generally, regardless of whether you would say "past/to" or "after/till", would the "quarter" have the indefinite article "a" or not? Are there differences between ...
0
votes
0answers
7 views

p.m. at end of sentence. Should there be two periods? [duplicate]

I was editing a sentence which ended in: till around 11pm I wanted to surround the sentence in double quotation marks, and place periods after p and m, as is recommended by the Chicago Manual of ...
0
votes
1answer
96 views

Homework till/on/for Monday [closed]

Could you explain to me the difference between these variants? Could there be more of them? What is a good guide (not a note-ish article) to use the correct prepositions with nouns of time? Thank you ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

for vs over (in time span)

I wonder if "for 50 years" has the same meaning with "over 50 years" ? Anyone who can help is highly appreciated.
55
votes
10answers
12k views

“Position” is to “space” as what word is to “time”?

Is there an English word that is the temporal equivalent to "position"? As position can be described as "where you are", I can think of "when you are" as the temporal meaning. Information on how ...
0
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0answers
89 views

How much later?

Growing up in the 1980s in New York City, I understood a plain "later" to mean "later in the same day", as in the examples below. As an adult, I lived in St. Louis, met people from many more places, ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

Where is it best to put the “when” of a sentence?

John yesterday went to the store to buy eggs. John went to the store yesterday to buy eggs. John went to the store to buy eggs yesterday.
0
votes
1answer
101 views

Time vs times confusion

"The Healthy Homes Guarantee Bill had long lead-in times for landlords to get their properties up to code." Why did the journalist use "times" instead of "time"? Would it be also correct if it had ...
0
votes
1answer
947 views

What is the official abbreviation of “week”?

I have tried searching in a number of places but could not find a reliable article/documentation that lists the official abbreviation of "week". There were however a couple of articles that said that ...
0
votes
2answers
47 views

How to use dates with from and to

Do these sentences make sense? "X is a food trade show which took place from the 4th to the 7th November 2013" "the international congress was held from 22nd to 24th October 2015" What are the ...
1
vote
1answer
410 views

What do you call people who are obsessed with time? [closed]

When you never know what time it is, and your family thinks it's polite to show up early.
-1
votes
1answer
270 views

Is there any relationship between time and tense?

The grammatical term 'tense' is defined in Oxford as follows: A set of forms taken by a verb to indicate the time (and sometimes also the continuance or completeness) of the action in relation to ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Can one say “at six months' term” ?

This is in discussing stock market analyses--"we estimate the fair market value will be XXX at six months' term".
0
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1answer
36 views

Usage of the word later [closed]

Mohan started writing a story on 3oth May and finishes it 2 days later. When did he finish it? Is the answer 1st June or 2nd June? Please explain. Thanks
0
votes
1answer
96 views

Using “after” before “ from when”

So, as silly as this may sound, I'm going through a phase where basically the most simple things that I once was able to say without even thinking about them, seem to have started to get foggier and ...
1
vote
2answers
64 views

What would one call the difference between lap times?

Let's say I ran a 200m. And my lap times would be: 14.50 seconds on the first 100m and 13.70 seconds in the last 100m. What would one call the difference between those two lap times (0.80 seconds). ...
92
votes
3answers
10k views

How did English retain its non-Christian names of the week?

It amazes me that despite centuries of religion dominating almost every aspect of life in Britain or at the very least exerting a great deal of influence on the public and private sphere, the English ...
26
votes
6answers
10k views

Is it true that English has no future tense?

I'm a native English speaker and I consider myself to have a very competent understanding of English grammar. Recently, I have started believing that there is no future tense in English grammar. ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Omitting preposition in clock time expressions

Googling for a time expression with and without ‘at’: “Leaves at 8am” yields ~ 24k hits “Leaves 8am” yields ~ 4k Is omitting the ‘at’ preposition here a less formal register, just an alternative ...
0
votes
1answer
141 views

Verb tense following “could have” in future

Hello dear forum members, The other day, as I was trying to formulate an acceptable sentence to express my frustration with someone about forcing me to leave the house for the train station extremely ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Omitting “when” or “where” in a time expression [closed]

During study, I was reading about the definition of "Age" at the "Cambridge Dictionary". Age is: the period of time someone has been alive or something has existed: Can I put "when" or "where" ...
3
votes
1answer
180 views

Time Travel Grammar

I recently watched a scene from the tv sitcom The Big Bang Theory with Sheldon explaining English grammar about time travel (related with the use of have, has, had...), is his explanation even ...
0
votes
0answers
46 views

Where shall I put the time in the sentences?

everyone. I know we can say: I'm going to finish the job tomorrow. I plan to finish the job tomorrow. But can I put the time to the front; Tomorrow, I'm going to finish the job. Tomorrow, I plan to ...
2
votes
3answers
156 views

Meaning of “There is not a direct relationship between verb forms and time.”

In Practical English Usage, the author Michael Swan says: There is not a direct relationship between verb forms and time. For example, a past verb like went is not only used to talk about past ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Take (an amount of time) FOR someone/ something to do something vs take someone/ something (an amount of time) to do something [duplicate]

I've come across both constructions. Is there any difference between them, when would one be preferably used over the other, and is any of them actually ungrammatical? Might it have something to do ...
0
votes
1answer
612 views

“____ days in advance” exact meaning

What is the deadline for something due “[#] days/weeks/etc. in advance”? For example, if something is required “seven days in advance” would providing it on Friday the week before be correct or too ...
0
votes
1answer
146 views

Average Wait Time or Times?

I can't figure out this sentence: We are experiencing longer than average wait times. I checked the dictionary. Time should not be countable. Can anyone tell me which one is correct? average ...
10
votes
1answer
188 views

Are there any Germanic cognates to “lithe”?

When winter first begins to bite                and stones crack in the frosty night,           when pools are black and trees are bare,                ’tis evil in the Wild to fare. In this time of ...
0
votes
1answer
272 views

The difference between “on time” and “in time” [closed]

I'm so confused while using "on time" and "in time" in sentences. I wanted to know if I have understood the meanings correctly. Does "on time" means exactly at the specific time that was planned? And ...