Questions tagged [terminology]

Terminology is a system of terms belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject, nomenclature.

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17 views

Is there a term for a compound word that may be split in multiple places? [duplicate]

The only example I can currently think of is from the Spawn comic book. The compound word “Hellspawn” may be split two different ways: Hell spawn (creature born of Hell) Hell’s pawn (a minor figure ...
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1answer
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What is a word to describe a person that loves all things paper?

I'm looking for a word to describe a person that ... loves all things paper; the best stationery, journals, handmade paper, expensive wrapping paper, etc. The kind of person who travels to other ...
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2answers
54 views

What is the literary term for not keeping a story consistent?

For example, if something is established early on in a story but is contradicted by something else later on, almost as if the detail was forgotten.
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What do these words “Pulls through/ Inoculates” mean in marketing

In a sales pitch of a service that a company offers, I found the two words in the title (pulls through & Inoculate). I consulted internet but could not find the answer for what they mean. The ...
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What does “legal jumping jacks” mean in the marketing context?

I came across the expression "legal jumping jacks" in a sentence from a sales pitch text which is explaining why that company is good to buy a service from. The sentence is like as below: We(...
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Is 'Brie' a proper noun?

Brie is defined in this Oxford Dictionary as follows: A kind of soft, mild, creamy cheese with a firm white skin. Origin Named after Brie in northern France, where it was originally made. ...
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Difference in meaning between a shoe insole/insert and a shoe pad?

Do shoe insoles/inserts and shoe pads mean the same thing? It seems some websites use them interchangeably ... Thank you!
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1answer
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Misusing “which” as a conjunction

Does anybody have a name for this construction? To me it is non-grammatical. I hiked early this morning with my sister which I am not a morning person! I hear this kind of thing quite a bit. It ...
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38 views

Word for the following week? [on hold]

I seem to recall that there is a term for the following week "the week X", which is analogous to the month proximo, except it is for the week, not the month, but I can't remember what it is.
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Would this usage of the word ''industrial'' be appropriate?

For context, I am writing about an industrial reputation, which is in reference to a reputation one has when in the industry (i.e Hollywood or the 'music industry'). Would it be correct to use ...
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what's the scientific term for “natural” in “natural blonde”

Jim Rogers (a famous investor) is very enamored with the natural blondeness of his current (third) wife. See here: and here: I once came across an interview of his where he described her as a "...
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Is there a term for hyperbolic words or expressions that are no longer used for exaggeration?

I recently encountered two instances of apparently hyperbolic terms that were used without any realisation that the traditional implications were far more serious / demanding / extreme. Someone said ...
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In Information Technology dialect, is “Associated with page component” -> “Page-associated component” abbreviation valid? [closed]

In Information Technology dialect, are expressions like "Associated with page component" -> "Page-associated Component" valid? It is not canonical English; the problem is are these expressions used ...
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Word meaning notes about a document

Is there a word with a meaning like "about this document" or "notes about a document"? That is a section of a document which contains meta information about the document, such as its purpose, ...
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204 views

What do you call the sentence structure of “The X-er __, the Y-er __”?

Is there a term for a sentence in the form of "The ___, the ___"? For example: The quieter you become, the more you are able to hear. Further, is this a proper sentence? Is there an implied verb?...
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1answer
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Is there a term for ordering items by color by wave length? [closed]

I tried looking for the word "chromologically", but didn't find any evidence to its existence. Further answers about sorting not by wave length, but by other factors, such as saturation, or ...
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What are the proper terms for the way you say vs write something?

We all know if something is three-dimensional you would write 3D. If someone says it aloud, you would hear "three dee". What are the right terms for one vs the other? EDIT To further clarify, I am ...
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4answers
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Term for “something that pursues goals” [closed]

Is there a word for "something that pursues goals"? Animals pursue goals, but so do humans, and we can even say that bacteria pursue goals, or even governments and companies.
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1answer
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Is there a term for a meaning that is wrong or different but about to be accepted by the majority? [closed]

It's about the Speedpaint thing. For example a speedpaint video that shows a sped up progress of a drawing using Photoshop. I've got into discussions with people claiming speedpaint is a wrong term ...
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Term for the saline equilibrium of the body?

There is a term for the balanced percentage level of salt in the body, but I can't remember what it is. It is not eutectic, but it is a word like that. The X level of salts in the human body is 0.9%.
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1answer
41 views

What is a two-letter language identifier called? [closed]

A list of languages might look like so: English (en) French (fr) German (de) What are the two-letter identifiers in brackets called?
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39 views

Wording for inheritance, heredity in programming

I have objects which are related in two ways: Mother-child relation I called inheritance or heredity. It means that everything defined in the mother object gets inherited to the child. Language ...
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'superannuation' and 'widow's pension' in legal terminology

I need somebody knowledgeable about pension law to help me with the the sentence below. I'm not sure about the terminology related to retirement plans and general comprehensibility? In May 2017, ...
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1answer
37 views

term for people who show contempt for other professions besides their own [closed]

I am looking for a term to describe or even coin for people who show little respect or who show even contempt for other professions besides their own.
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1answer
54 views

What's the difference between “stochastic” and “random”?

Is one just used to sound fancy? Webster defines the former as the latter: Definition of stochastic 1 : RANDOM specifically : involving a random variable a stochastic process 2 : ...
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Usage of computer terms? [migrated]

What resource do you use to research usage of computer terms, such as "checkbox" versus "check box"?
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What is the sound/audio equivalent of “unsightly”?

The title pretty much says it all: what is the English equivalent (if such exists) for "unsightly" when applied to sound? "Ill-sounding" isn't as succinct and brings to mind the actual sounds of ...
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2answers
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What is the expression you make trying not to smile?

I have been trying to see if there is an expression for this for a while now. You know when you're about to laugh or smile at something, but that would be inappropriate or embarrassing, so you force a ...
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If “X is a dependency of Y” then “Y is a ??? of X” [duplicate]

"X is a dependency of Y" means that Y depends on X (i.e. we have to import Y in X's source code). Is there a word that fits in "Y is a ??? of X", meaning X uses Y?
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Is there a term for two or more words within a word? [duplicate]

As the title says, I was wondering if there was a term for two or more words within a word, for example: 'Beyond' is 'yo' enclosed in 'bend'.
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Concise way of describing two mathematical variables being increased through differing ranges of values

I increase the value of two parameters in an equation through two (differing) ranges - with the second iterating through the entire range for each value of the first. i.e. If increase the values of ...
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2answers
142 views

What’s the grammatical role of “for you” in “I am waiting for you”?

What is the grammatical role of "for you" in "I am waiting for you"? Is it a direct object, a prepositional phrase or what? Functionally, it seems to be of an object, as "you" in "I love you", but I ...
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1answer
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How long has the expression 'underage woman' been in use, and is it an oxymoron?

A blog entry posted today at The Atlantic online—"The Myth of the 'Underage Woman'," by Megan Garber—argues that "underage woman" is an oxymoron: The phrase is wrong in every sense: There is no ...
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70 views

Smartphone, Cell phones, Mobile phones, Handphones, Cell

When writing a "legal" document in English which term is more appropriate (between Handphone, Smartphone, Cell Phone, Mobile Phone, Cellular phone, cell, etc) and can be safely (& correctly) used ...
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Separation of concerns: Just a computer science term?

I studied computer science, that's why the term "Separation of concerns" is common for me. I read the wikipedia article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Separation_of_concerns Now I am unsure. Up to ...
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3answers
104 views

Terminology for expert who didn't go to college to study it

What's the right term/name for a person who is an expert eg. a smith, a plumber, electrician, a writer, clerk etc but he or she didn't went to college/university to study that particular course. And ...
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What is the name of this type of adjective?

Okay, I've been wondering this for a while. There's a specific type of adjective, and it seems to me that it should have a name, but I'm not sure if it does. It's the class of adjectives that can be ...
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Why is the “I” in “Indigenous crisis” capitalized?

This is from today's Guardian: I am wondering why the newspaper capitalized the "I" in "Indigenous". According to Lexico, indigenous is spelled with a lowercase letter
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2answers
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Is the right term to call the children of your sister wives in a polygynous marriage “stepchildren”?

I came across this issue what describing in writing the relatives of a woman commonly known in the West as Princess Haya. Princess Haya is the youngest of four current wives of the current ruler of ...
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Correct word for a little toy that always stands up?

In Spanish, we have a word for a little toy that always stand up, "tentetieso". I want to search for those toys in English, but I can't find the correct word or specific description to find them.
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“Stakeholder” usage

I think I understand what Stakeholder means (=person/people or parties, companies etc. who are interested and may benefit financially from a project, for example), but I'd like to know if I can call ...
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1answer
115 views

What do you call people who give out awards, certificates and trophies?

I give out awards on a daily basis. However, I never knew the actual terminology for the person who hands out awards. I was thinking of awarder but that doesn't seem right.
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3answers
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Logical disjunction and English Language

In Logic Or signals a Logical disjuction it means an inclusive OR. I get into trouble when saying OR and mean inclusive OR. Is the person Black or Male? I usually get this considered a "wrong" ...
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1answer
41 views

Term used to describe a forced purchase

I remember reading an article discussing the idea of paying for medical care - it used a term I can't quite remember, but essentially it described this term being a purchase that people would have to ...
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1answer
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The use of conjunction “and” to avoid repetition

I apologize if my question seems trivial for people who study literature and English language in depth. My question is basically related to the following statements: The existence of X The ...
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4answers
71 views

What is a single word to denote up-to-date-ness that would work in this context?

I want to add a word to the following list in my sentence to denote "up-to-date-ness" but am struggling to find the word: ...and addresses the accuracy, reliability, relevance, <up-to-date-ness> ...
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251 views

Origin of the suffix in hippocampus

Hippocampus, a tiny organ in the brain - named after its resemblance to a tiny sea creature, the sea-horse (the genus of which is led to the original coinage of 'hippocampus') - has been some source ...
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What do you call sentence structures with unnecessary pronouns? [duplicate]

Examples: "The father, he was very angry." instead of "The father was very angry" "The cup, it was overflowing." instead of "The cup was overflowing" I have seen it in dramatic texts, especially ...
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Looking for a single term to describe items that a person carries with them everyday (e.g. phone, wallet, keys, etc.)

I'm trying to find a term for items that are commonly carried every day such as phone, wallet and keys. "Everyday Items" doesn't quite seem to carry to connotation I'm looking for as it makes me ...
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1answer
63 views

Expression for straight male who prefers the company of gay men

We used to call women who preferred the company of gay men as "fag hags" What are straight men who prefer the company of gay men called? I found nothing on the internet, unless you count Urban.