Questions tagged [terminology]

This tag is for questions seeking or discussing a term (or terms) belonging or peculiar to a science, art, or specialized subject (e.g. linguistics, mathematics, physics, biology, finance, theatre, music, philosophy, astronomy, medical, nautical etc.). Consider adding [single-word-requests] and [phrase-requests] tags also if relevant.

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What's a pithy term to describe what a spy does when he/she socializes with a target to get information?

I'm working on a roleplaying game, and I want a pithy name for a skill that modern intelligence agents call "elicitation of intelligence." Setting is the interwar period in Europe (between ...
PandRNframe's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

What is the metric name or designation for nominal ½″ copper pipe in the various English dialects where metric dimensions are used?

I hope this question is as on-topic as this question about distances. I need to know what people call nominal ½″ copper pipe (the stiff unbendable kind used in domestic plumbing) in English dialects ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
44 views

Word for the final instance of awarding a perpetual trophy

We have a perpetual trophy that has been awarded for almost four decades. The Award is being retired, and presented to a worthy recipient one last time. How do I refer to this instance of the awarding?...
Jess's user avatar
  • 11
0 votes
0 answers
27 views

What kind of word is "Brother" or "Sister"? [duplicate]

Some Christians use "Brother" or "Sister" before referring to someone, and usually they prefix the word before their name (e.g. Brother Aaron). I am asking what the use of this ...
ruenaud's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
52 views

Why ternary not ternal?

Why is is the base-2 numeral system called binary, the base-3 one called ternary, when base-8 is octal and base-10 is decimal? The different suffixes, -ary vs -al, are what I am concerned about.
minseong's user avatar
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-1 votes
0 answers
13 views

Is it in time or on time? [duplicate]

Is it in time or on time? How do you use it in a sentence eg I hope they would able to come in time or on time for my performance
oby's user avatar
  • 1
2 votes
2 answers
467 views

Is there a term for when people use a definition from a different context?

This type of thing happens a lot online. People will say something like "strawberries aren't actually berries technically" or "tomatoes are actually fruit" when people are taking ...
Schuyler's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
0 answers
56 views

What term describes a phrase like "in English, please"? [duplicate]

The phrase "in English, please" has different meanings in different social contexts. In one context it might mean literal English language, and in another it could imply a response in layman'...
Josh Hibschman's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
81 views

What do you call an answer that disagrees with the question?

For example, if person A said "Why should we do x?" and person B said "I don't think we should do x", what would you call this?
Anonymous's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
167 views

What is a more inclusive version of "pedestrian"?

A pedestrian [noun] is a "person going on foot" (Merriam Webster). Is there a more inclusive term that also includes people in wheelchairs and other mobility devices, but excluding people in ...
DLu's user avatar
  • 121
0 votes
1 answer
88 views

What is the category name used for words describing mathematical operations?

Refer to this question for more examples. We have multiplication, which has "multiply" as the verb. But we say "a times b". Similarly, we have division, which has "divide"...
aghast's user avatar
  • 201
-1 votes
1 answer
101 views

Is there a word for when the name of something describes or defines how it is made?

I am wondering if there is a word for this as described in the title. My example: I am writing about a SWANA ingredient/food product by the name of "Freekeh", which is based on the Arabic ...
freekehfreak's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
55 views

interlock vs intersect, which one is precise?

I would like to use word interlock for FIG.A and not sure I could use it for FIG.B, is insert or slide better for FIG.B, anyone could help with this?
cmabill's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
88 views

Drinking vs drinkable

Knowing that drinkable refers to safe to drink, why do we often say drinking water in stead of drinkable water? I find potable water (i.e.water fit/ safe to drink) synonymous with drinking water. So, ...
Selfie geoupie's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
64 views

What word can be used for one who values the original version of literature over the altered one?

I'm wanting to refer to someone who would not appreciate anyone overlooking the fact that monks altered Beowulf and I'm wanting to say "be sensitive to the originalists" when speaking about ...
Greystonelea's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is there a name for this kind of loose pseudo alliteration? for example, gold -> glitter, crown -> king

In Norse poetry, to the fastidious skald, a word like take is not considered to alliterate with train, but a word like track does alliterate with a word like troop, and tear does alliterate with tin. ...
Ludvig Boysen's user avatar
15 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is the "convert to decimal form" usage of "decimate" still used?

Recently, I came across a page in an olden-day arithmetic book (early 20th century) It seems that the word decimate was used in the sense "convert [a vulgar fraction] into a decimal fraction&...
Selfie geoupie's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
113 views

Rising Pitch as the only minimal pair differentiator? The "cot" - "caw" [split? semi-merge? something else?]

Canonically, English is not a tonal language, and there are a number of posts on this site discussing why the use of rising tone in asking a question does not qualify (the reason being that it doesn't ...
Quack E. Duck's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
147 views

What is the technique that produces phrases like "Miss Anne Thrope" called and is there a master list of names?

Misanthrope, as a word, can be converted into the pseudonym "Miss Anne Thrope" (bonus points if the meaning reflects the writer's style). But what is this technique called and is there a ...
Beeflong's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
66 views

Is there a term like "antonym" but for words of opposite sentiment?

I like to play a game where I take a descriptive word with an emotional bias (i.e. describing something "good" or "bad") and I try to think of a word with roughly the same meaning ...
Zekko's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
41 views

Phrases only differing by spaces [duplicate]

Is there a name for phrases that differ from another only by spaces? For example, "superb rain" differs from "super brain" only by spaces. So if the name of this is X, we could say ...
Kelly Bundy's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
117 views

Word equivalent to "prestation" in French in the administrative field

I'm searching for an English word which could have the same meaning than the word "prestation" in french, in the sense of "some service (paid or not) that has been executed by an ...
swiss_knight's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
49 views

Term to quantify a parameter in a decision-making procedure which affects multiple individuals?

Suppose a group of people are purchasing ice cream, and a flavor must be chosen for each member of the group. One possible procedure would be for a single, trusted member to decide which flavor each ...
user10478's user avatar
  • 115
1 vote
1 answer
220 views

What do you call the person or character being spoken to in a poem or song?

This question asks what to call the person who is speaking in a lyric poem. The terms "narrator", "speaker", "persona", etc. may be used to refer to the "I" in &...
mriklojn's user avatar
  • 111
0 votes
1 answer
71 views

Is there a better word for the sound of a mechanical "whirr"?

I am struggling to find an adequate word that represents the buzz or whirr of mechanical movement, I want something that feels more technical. If anyone is familiar with engineering jargon that might ...
Koby Schuman's user avatar
-1 votes
2 answers
65 views

Is there a term for websites that answer a question contained in the domain name?

There exist sites such as https://shouldiblamecaching.com/, https://isitdns.com/, and https://isitchristmas.com/ that use the domain name to ask a question and show a simple yes or no answer. Is there ...
Bob's user avatar
  • 137
2 votes
0 answers
52 views

A hole carved out in wall for a wooden crossbeam

I once saw a word for a hole carved out in a wall on purpose to accept a wooden crossbeam that fits into the hole. I think it had a "p" in it, something like "pit hole" ?...
MrSparkly's user avatar
  • 568
8 votes
6 answers
2k views

Is there a (current or historical) word for the extremes on the left-right axis?

Is there, or has there ever been, an unambiguous word for "the leftmost extreme" or "the rightmost extreme"? Such words exist for the other two dimensions. Imagine you are ...
crb's user avatar
  • 256
0 votes
0 answers
33 views

Term for words which can have the same or opposite meanings in same contexts [duplicate]

In Term for words which can have the same or opposite meanings in different contexts?, hot and cool are opposite temperatures, but can also both be used to mean fashionably attractive/impressive. I ...
kando's user avatar
  • 109
12 votes
3 answers
1k views

What is the origin of the verb 'foxed' in reference to book condition?

I ordered a book online, unseen, and the invoice told me the book, or at least its pages, were 'foxed'. I had never come across the expression, did not know the word could be a verb and discovered : ...
Nigel J's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
44 views

“Core” as the name of a class in school

When I was in middle school (roughly ages 10–13 years old) in the US in the early 1970s, they combined English—or what might now be called language arts—with social studies into a single class that ...
PaulTanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
76 views

What are the things with information that are under or next to museum exhibits called? [duplicate]

I'm trying to figure out what the things the arrows are pointing to are called. (For a school assignment.)
nerd's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
4 answers
709 views

Is there a word for fans making excuses for their favorite artist? [duplicate]

The example I'm thinking of is Bethesda and Starfield. Other than the graphics it's not a well designed game, but people keep making excuses for it, when smaller teams have done far more with far less ...
Austin Capobianco's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
73 views

What is the grammatical structure of {the + superlative substantive}?

Example 1: This was the deepest a submarine had ever dived. Example 2: The longest a person can hold their breath for is... I've looked at a couple grammar resources including "the Cambridge ...
John's user avatar
  • 13
2 votes
2 answers
76 views

Is there a word for discrimination at a level higher than species?

Richard Ryder coined the term speciesism to describe discrimination on grounds of species. This is concept is explored by Peter Singer in Animal Liberation Now and described by nature: Singer rests ...
User65535's user avatar
  • 173
1 vote
0 answers
42 views

Referring to the winter period [duplicate]

Since the winter period passes over the end of the year, which is the correct way to refer to the winter period which starts at the end of, say, this year 2023? Is it "this year's winter" or ...
Len's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
59 views

A term (or phrase) for when a person tries to represent the rarest scenario as the most common

For context: This term or phrase is what it's called when a person (very often used in political debates) will try to take the rarest occurrence of any particular topic and present it as if it's the ...
Will Haynes's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
84 views

What is the grammatical name for “the countless flashes of red from swords and spears”? [closed]

What is the grammatical name and function for this string? the countless flashes of red from swords and spears
Lil Boo's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
82 views

Term for a false implication trap like "if you're smart you'd agree with me"?

I hear this kind of false implications pretty often, e.g.: If you're smart you'd agree with me People who understand the situation would all agree that ... Anyone who says something else must be ...
Leo Jiang's user avatar
  • 191
0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Is there a term for the device of repeating the exact same word twice immediately to emphasize its sincerity or power? [duplicate]

I already know the term anaphora exists for repeating the same word for emphasis. I'm specifically interested in a term for repeating a word twice without additional clarification to express that ...
Paul Martin's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
51 views

How to characterize Machiavelli's phrase, "The ends justify the means"? [closed]

This question has been raised and thoroughly discussed: "How to characterize the phrase, 'The ends justify the means.'" I wish to add a thought. As I was writing a book for publication, I ...
Jeffsbooks's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
138 views

What is the overall-encompassing term for the "fruit-like" plant growths that we use for harvest and consumption

What is a good term for plants whose parts, either as tubers, roots, or fruit/seeds are harvested and consumed? I exclude plants such as hemp and flax whose fibres are used, or, for example, poppies ...
J Sartin's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
53 views

Word for terminology related to mathematical premises

I have seen some mathematical texts that use words like Lemma, Theorem, Corollary, etc. What would be the appropriate description of such terms? Do they fall under some linguistic category? Is ...
Prego's user avatar
  • 107
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

Is there a better term than "Jargon" to describe words like Phishing, Vishing, Smishing, and Qishing? [duplicate]

Assuming "phreak" is a portmanteau of "phone" and "freak," giving us the term "phreaking" to describe the illicit act of hacking telephone networks, and "...
koffkah's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
1 answer
142 views

What is an object (talisman, amulet, salt circle etc.) that hinders or stops an evil spirit called?

What is an object that hinders or stops a spirit (specifically evil) called? I.e. a talisman, salt circle, or any other enchanted object.
Help please's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
149 views

Specific type of deception or logic error

The word I'm looking for should describe a case where, during a logical argument, a person uses a word with multiple definitions in sense (1) in one part of the argument, but in another part of the ...
bielawski's user avatar
  • 163
4 votes
2 answers
380 views

What is the word for the fusing of, for example, "-ed" and the final consonant "d" to give the ending (with voice removed) of "bent"?

Instead of giving the past tense form bended, the verb bend fuses together bend and -ed and removes voice, producing bent. Lent and sent are produced in similar fashion. What's the word for the fusion ...
ool's user avatar
  • 151
1 vote
0 answers
88 views

Use of the verb ‘output’ [closed]

I need some advice on the use of output as a verb. To put it in context, I am working on a desktop app that uses some of the functionality of MS Word. In the app, there is an element called a binding ...
VlasovStanislav's user avatar
1 vote
3 answers
95 views

A term for mixture used for palatography

When doing palatography, one needs something to paint the tongue with. It is usually a mixture of olive/sunflower oil and powdered charcoal. The question is, what can this substance be called? Is it a ...
Aer's user avatar
  • 185
16 votes
12 answers
4k views

The usage of "can not" vs. "cannot" in mathematics

I saw the following passage in Professor West's homepage, and I hadn't noticed this point before. See https://dwest.web.illinois.edu/grammar.html#cannot "Can not" and "may be". ...
licheng's user avatar
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