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Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

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24 views

use of “respectively” after a repetitive noun

I found several threads addressing the use of "respectively". But none covered my scenario. I'm wondering whether the following sentence works? A and B were used as (a) positive (control) and (...
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2answers
44 views

Can I use “proud” in this phrase: “Proud company for nonprofits”?

This phrase is a title. I am not sure in the use of "proud" before a noun even though I saw in the dictionary that this structure exists. What do you think? How do you understand the phrase? Thanks in ...
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0answers
20 views

On the use of “than”

In my neuroscience paper, I wrote this sentence: "Therefore, I hypothesize that the frequency of action potential produced in the tarsus is higher when the it is bent left than when the tarsus is ...
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0answers
29 views

Sentence Structure of Wuthering Heights

The tyrant grinds down his slaves and they don’t turn against him; they crush those beneath them(1). I am a grade 12 student and recently I started researching the topic of sentence structure, ...
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24 views

What are the terms of analysis for prepositions that take verbal objects?

Prepositions are always followed by objects but these are not always nouns, they often take untensed verb clauses (?) as objects, apparently in both passive and active forms. For example in the ...
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1answer
62 views

Is there any difference between “you both will” and “you will both”? [duplicate]

For example, are both of the following sentences correct: If it is cold out, you both will need a coat. If it is cold out, you will both need a coat. And do they mean the same thing?
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35 views

Aren't 'indirect object complements', in terms of their function, actually adverbial complements?

I understand the direct/ indirect object paradigm but in my thinking I've come to really challenge this conceptualization of sentence structure, which I think is very confusing to students. Let me ...
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0answers
24 views

Clarification about the phrase “within [x] years of the date…”

Does the phrase "within [x] years of the date..." mean before or after (or both?) the specified date? For example, in the phrase, "GRE scores taken within 5 years of the date application was received,"...
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1answer
37 views

What's the correct syntax to use for this adjective

So I have biscuits which are made from cow's milk and the milk used in it is unadulterated and pure. Which of these usages convey the above correctly? 1st: Biscuits made from pure cow's milk. ...
2
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1answer
40 views

WH-movement with complex sentences

I'm editing a biography in which the author, who isn't a native English speaker, stated the following: I started a business at the age of 21 and had no idea what were the most important skills I ...
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1answer
67 views

“Bent 90 degrees” or “at 90 degrees”?

The metal bar was straight. But I bent it to make a right (90 degrees) angle. Can I say it as below? The metal bar was bent 90 degrees. (90 degree / at 90 degree / to 90 degree) 90 degree / degrees ...
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0answers
38 views

Suffix corresponding to an idea described with two nouns

Please pardon my lack of understanding for major English Language concepts, I'll be using layman's terms. Now, I've encountered this issue in the past while writing. Consider this text: That was ...
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1answer
155 views

When did “our” stop being used as an adjective (as in “other our dominions”, “any our Subjects”)?

While reading a letter written by Queen Elizabeth I of England in 1588, I came across a certain construction that doesn't seem to be grammatical in English: RIGHT trustie, and righte welbelovid ...
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2answers
54 views

Difference between the two similar senses of about as a preposition

Oxford Living Dictionaries defines the preposition about in sense 2 and 3 that are quite similar; their similarity disabled me contradict between such senses. Sense 2. [British] Used to indicate ...
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2answers
510 views

“Sending off a balloon”: verb or noun?

Agnes suggested sending off a balloon with a message to Jenny. The phrase sending off puzzles me. I know it’s a verb phrase, but I don’t understand why it ends on -ing. Is it a noun or a verb? I've ...
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3answers
110 views

Should I use a hyphen, an en dash, or an em dash to define or introduce a word? [closed]

I have looked up online and studied usages for the hyphen, en dash, and em dash. I still haven't found an answer if I can define words with a dash in English. The backstory on dashes defining ...
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0answers
110 views

What verbs in English never take nouns as complements, and is there a term for this?

I can think of only a few verbs like exist and belong that never take ordinary nouns as object complements. (see below) We never say things like, *She exists a doctor. Rather, we would say, She ...
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1answer
128 views

Are the following sentences grammatically correct?

I'm having some troubles with a more literary writing style, and I wanted to check if the following sentences are correct grammatically, and if not, what exactly is the problem and what alternatives ...
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1answer
42 views

“all [object]'s [properties]” vs “[object]'s all [properties]”

Which form is correct and why? "all [object]'s [properties]" OR "[object]'s all [properties]" Here's an example: In order to use all the machine's available cores. In order to use the machine's all ...
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1answer
28 views

Two adverbs, and an indefinite article

I found two adverbs, between which indefinite article, in TVTRopes site: Upon reading it, the host concludes that it's actually a really old joke that everyone knows. Is it grammatical to ...
3
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2answers
83 views

Is “The Dad is fishing” acceptable?

Is there something wrong with this sentence? The Dad is fishing. In my opinion. It sounds wrong using Dad as the subject. This is the context: A student was given the task to make a declarative ...
3
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1answer
75 views

Correct or not: noun and adjective being predicative together

I'm thinking about such a sentence: He is a lawyer, arrogant and smart. or He is an idiot, arrogant and short-sighted. Please note that here I just want to list the noun and the ...
13
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1answer
2k views

He discovered that his father had a special box in the basement

He discovered that his father had a special box in the basement I was told that I should not use "that" in the above sentence although it is grammatically correct to use it. Why I shouldn't use "that"...
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1answer
104 views

Can the phrase “the likes of which” and “with which” be combined to prevent ending a sentence in a preposition?

Here is the example I was writing when I came across this problem. It is imperative that you cease this infernal flirtation, lest you unleash forces the likes of and with which the world has ...
3
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1answer
71 views

Usage and order of “galore”: an adjective, but looks like an adverb

It is common to put adverbs of manner after a direct object. But is it grammatically correct to put an adjective after noun? As in: Since then there have been reports, inquiries and guidance galore. ...
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1answer
67 views

Usage of the Word “Expression” With Reference to Any Series of Words

I need to know whether it is correct to call any series of words an “expression.” Examples: "The study of natural phenomena has continued for centuries, with significant discoveries being made in ...
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1answer
50 views

Usage of which in English

In Barron's ACT guide, I was stumped by the following: "Man alone was endowed by imagination, which was bound to complicate matters for him" was stated grammatically incorrect. Why would that be the ...
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3answers
83 views

Using “as” instead of “that” (I don't know as this is valid)

When answering the ELL question “I can't say as ever I was lost” quoted Daniel Boone, I said that having as instead of that in the cited context was a "dialectal, folksy" usage. Then I came up with ...
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1answer
31 views

Sentences that begin with “To think that;” are they impersonal?

Sentences such as To think that she did all that To think that Messi and Cristiano Rolando are both out of the World Cup To think that this could ever happen to me Are these impersonal ...
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1answer
26 views

“But anything to…”

I'm wondering about the grammaticality of a sentence like "That might have been a far-fetched argument. But anything to make my point." (I'm curious specifically about the sentence in bold.) Although ...
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2answers
55 views

Deferring a noun belonging to a preposition until after a conjunction

Is it grammatically correct to defer the use of a noun (belonging to preposition) until after a conjunction? In order to scale to (deferred noun: multi-objective optimisation) and study multi-...
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1answer
106 views

in case + verb form [closed]

Thinking things through, here ... (a) Bring a pen, in case you need to take some notes (b) Bring a pen, in case you needed to take some notes (c) Bring a pen, in case you might need to ...
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2answers
25 views

Transform a sentence

I'm not a native English speaker. For example, there is a sentence: "They made an example out of me". How can I say it the other way, like: "I was made an example out of"? Do these sentences ...
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2answers
76 views

On the syntax of “just” with a “that-clause.”

I'm trying to work things through, (a) It's just that they won (b) She thinks just that they won (???) (c) She just thinks that they won In (a), just can appear immediately before the "that-...
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2answers
69 views

Verb form after “when” referring to the future

You would have to be very upset with her not to answer the phone when she calls/called you. Is it "calls" or "called"? From what I gather, it can be either (or at least, I've seen both verb forms ...
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0answers
85 views

What's the syntax of “purport”?

I keep reading in some style/usage books that "purport" shouldn't be turned passive because the sense of the verb is "already passive." Thus, Three people were arrested Sunday at the Smithsonian ...
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45 views

How many “of” is allowed? How to reposition nouns correctly?

Facing this, I am not sure that I know the right answer. At the university, I was taught that only 2 prepositions "of" are allowed to be sounding natural. If it comes to translation from Russian into ...
2
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0answers
68 views

A companion to McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English? [closed]

What would be a good syntax book to read as companion to James McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English? As great as McCawley's book is, at times it makes for challenging reading, particularly ...
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1answer
42 views

Putting “to do..” at the beginning?

There are some sentences 1-) I see no reason to do these stupid things. 2-) I can find no sensible explanation for you to leave your master program. An English professor from Canada at the ...
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1answer
43 views

On repeating adjectives

Consider the following sentence: Oh you think this speech is insulting? Don't worry, it gets much more (insulting). How should I phrase this sentence? Can I omit the second occurrence of the ...
1
vote
1answer
101 views

“ ‘A cynic’ is what an idealist calls a realist.” vs. “A cynic is what an idealist calls a realist.”

The first sentence is unambiguous. Is it correct or incorrect to interpret the second sentence the same way as the first? Put another way, does the structure of the second sentence allow for a ...
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2answers
161 views

“Jack believed that Bob said that Nancy saw Bill drove fast yesterday”?

What is ungrammatical about this sentence? Jack believed that Bob said that Nancy saw Bill drove fast yesterday. At the moment I have found out that the main verb,believed, is tensed, and the ...
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0answers
40 views

Less vs Fewer: what kind of problem is this? Syntax, usage, grammar?

If someone consistently misused fewer and less in their speech, would you say they have a problem with syntax, usage, grammar or something else? What class of problem does fewer/less fall into?
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3answers
2k views

Is “I am who(m) God made me” grammatical?

SAH asked an interesting question about case, I am [who/whom] G-d made me, but one issue that came up in the comments repeatedly is that many people said that they find the example sentence ...
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0answers
32 views

Syntactic analysis of the sentence

I can't quite understand how to make a syntactic analysis of the following sentence: He decided that he would make sure that their promise came true.
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1answer
86 views

Nominal and Adjectival

The fact that you are here is an indication of your good intentions My analysis of the clause in bold is Noun-clause/Adjectival/Post-nominal modifier. However, my teacher's answer is slightly ...
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0answers
38 views

How do I decide which to choose syntax tree to parse a sentence?

For example, I have a sentence like: The dog is running to the tree. I need to parse this tree to components and I want to use syntax tree models (tense phrase, noun phrase, etc.). Which one is ...
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1answer
33 views

Umbrella term for word types

So, when we analyze language (spoken or written), we tend to classify words according to their syntactic roles or functions (right?): nouns, pronouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, conjunctions, and so ...
2
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1answer
282 views

Verbs that can't be used in the passive

Why can't some stative verbs be used in the passive? We can't, for example, passivize resemble, but we can passivize know, love and like?
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1answer
46 views

I am not what happened to me. I am what I choose to become. [closed]

The quote by Carl Jung sounds grammatically incorrect to me. "I am not what happened to me" sounds weird. Is it correct or no?