Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 174 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [syntax]

Questions regarding the rules for the formation of sentences

0
votes
0answers
18 views

related sas text eminer [on hold]

I have got text clusters in sas text eminer 12.1 for specific zipcode. My data has 50 zipcodes. So its cumbersome to individually put 50 import files and run text clustering. I want to get text ...
-1
votes
0answers
24 views

Is “Make the world go wow” correct? [on hold]

I am proof reading a client's website and they have this as their tagline, is this syntactically correct?
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

Use of prepositions at the end of some questions but not others

I was correcting some ESL work today and found myself wondering about why we do this: Where do you want to go? (no to) Where are you looking? (no at) Why are you apologising? (no for) What did you ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Which article is correct when referring to a disease? (e.g. the flu, a cold) [duplicate]

I just had my first Composition 102 lecture and the professor said that when you refer to a disease you use "the" as in "the flu." I don't argue with that example because you say "I have the flu," ...
0
votes
2answers
40 views

“You are all {so/such} wonderful friends.” Which is more correct?

In a kangarou English exam, one of the questions asked you to fill in a blank space in a sentence: You are all ......... wonderful friends What is more correct to use to fill in the blank space, "...
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Pretended not to hear or pretended to not hear? [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand whether the two sentences are the same or are they different? 1. She pretended not to hear... 2. She pretended to not hear... Personally, I prefer the second choice but I ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Priority of “have to” and “always”

Each data sample consists of features and a label, but some data samples do not have a label; features are enough to define them. Depending on this knowledge, which one is correct word order ? The ...
4
votes
5answers
135 views

Jane Austen “Persuasion” Syntax Analysis

This is from Chapter four of "Persuasion" by Jane Austen: She was persuaded that under every disadvantage of disapprobation at home, and every anxiety attending his profession, all their probable ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Yes-no question with the adjective comprehensible

I constructed a question that I thought was grammatically correct, but I have gotten confused after being told that the sentence was ambiguous. Is (verb) what is meant (in the sentence) (Subject) ...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

What is the right word order? [closed]

Is it correct to say: The party is at my house in the garden. OR The party is in the garden at my house. Thank you in advance
3
votes
3answers
70 views

Why can 'X as well as Y' be written as 'as well X as Y'?

Prof. Brooks Landon, U. Iowa, Ph.D., U. Texas at Austin, Building Great Sentences: How to Write the Kinds of Sentences You Love to Read (Great Courses), 2013, p 193:         ...
2
votes
1answer
44 views

What's the FUNCTIONAL difference between a supplement and an adjunct/modifier?

I'm trying to understand the difference between supplements and adjuncts/modifiers. In my search for enlightenment, I've come across a number of entries and posts, of which I think this one summarises ...
-1
votes
0answers
8 views

Is “went away” a suitable synonym of “stopped appearing” for inanimate objects?

This sounds perfectly okay to me: The salesman went away when I refused to pay him any heed. But is the following ok? The warnings went away when I did X. (i.e. the warnings, which used to ...
1
vote
1answer
65 views

Constituent structure of 'He arranged for me to go there'

This question was inspired by the discussions in this post. Consider the sentence [1] He arranged for me to go there. What is required is to determine its constituent structure (in the sense of ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Difference between the two sentences and why are they used in that particular way [closed]

Is there any difference between these two sentences? I bought my friends some chocolates. I bought some chocolates for my friends.
1
vote
0answers
37 views

Is English in the process of creating a nominative absolute in compound objects?

I have been observing the increasing frequency of the use of the nominative in cases such as: Mary always has a huge disagreement with you and I. If you have a problem at school, you can let your ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

What's that you say? [Syntactic role of 'you say']

An opinion article titled "Mattel and Margot Robbie's Barbie movie is not the film 2019 needs" has this passage: Yet I don't think Mattel gives a tinker's cuss whether we're hating on Barbie or ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

How to use passive voice in a sentence? [duplicate]

And as he ate it, she looked at him steadily. In this sort of grammatical constructions, "she" works as a subject of the sentence with active voice. Now, consider a sentence which I read in The ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

How do we tell whether an element is licensed or not?

I read a comment on licensing in another post, which made me revisit this concept. Unfortunately I'm away over the holidays, and haven't got access to CaGEL – only to its "little brother", A Student's ...
2
votes
0answers
54 views

Difference between supplemental NP and absolute clause?

What is the difference between a supplemental noun phrase and a absolute clause? In these examples and in general. Is it just the non-finite nature of the second example? Are they not serving a ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Stranding “of” in subjects - Possible or impossible?

Observation Take a subject that contains an of-phrase (friend of X, president of X, writer of X etc.). Now try to question the element X after of by fronting the corresponding wh-phrase. Often this ...
1
vote
2answers
72 views

Where is the subject in a sentence that starts with a prepositional phrase

Where is the subject in a sentence that starts with a prepositional phrase. For example the preposition phrase beginning with after below: After breakfast the boys wandered out to the garden. Is ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Prepositional verb structure - “[rely] [on John]” or “[rely on] [John]”

It is difficult to determine the correct consituent structure of prepositional verbs, such as rely on someone. Either on someone forms a constituent to the exclusion of rely, as in (1), or rely on ...
5
votes
2answers
115 views

Combining demonstrative and possessive pronoun

I know of at least one language (German, although it’s considered old-fashioned nowadays) where it’s possible to combine demonstrative and possessive pronoun: Diese deine Worte sind wahr. ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

“a food-hygienically acceptable substance”: Grammatical syntax?

In a document (written by a native Japanese speaker), I see the following phrase that sets off my acceptability and grammaticality alarms: a food-hygienically acceptable substance Google shows ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Is my syntax correct and is there a better version?

Here is the sentence: "Why is a conjugated system bigger, the smaller the atomic electron transitions?" I mean that when a conjugated system gets bigger, the atomic electron transitions get smaller, ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Changing the passive infinitive into the active voice

This problem has been bothering me for almost a week. I was hoping for that lightbulb moment but it's still dark in the attic, so here I am. In the English coursebook, MyGrammarLab Advanced C1/C2, ...
1
vote
1answer
57 views

is/are + past participle vs. have been + past particple

So I am really confused when to use past participle and have been + p.p For example In situations like the ones below Are these dishes washed? Have these dishes been washed? (Washed and ...
3
votes
2answers
69 views

Is this “as~as” comparison construction acceptable?

From my understanding, the main formula for an "as~as" comparison is: (subject + verb)(object) [as {adjective/adverb/noun} as] (complements: clause/noun phrase/adjective/adverb) For example: He is as ...
2
votes
3answers
119 views

“should always have been done”/“should have made”/ should have been always done” [closed]

So I'm doing a coffeemaker advert in English and it is not my native language. I think you have to know the idea behind this sentence so you can help me to get this grammatically and ideally right. ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Adjective order with dead & pregnant

I have just listened to a presentation to adjective order in my linguistics class, however, it failed to answer my question. Would an English speaker say "this is a dead pregnant cat" or "this is a ...
2
votes
0answers
145 views

When do you use “the” and when do you not use “the” in a sentence? [closed]

When do you use "the" and when do you not use "the" in a sentence? I intuitively know but don't know how to explain. I'm trying to explain this concept to an ESL student.
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Syntactic function of “available” in a specific case

In What is the largest size available?, what is the syntactic function of available? And do you know any structure similar to this one? Thank you, Teresa
2
votes
1answer
115 views

X-bar tree for a sentence

Those talents, as they make a part of his fortune, so do they likewise of that of the society to which he belongs. (Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations) The structure of the sentence above from Adam ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Can I use “proud” in this phrase: “Proud company for nonprofits”?

This phrase is a title. I am not sure in the use of "proud" before a noun even though I saw in the dictionary that this structure exists. What do you think? How do you understand the phrase? Thanks in ...
3
votes
1answer
181 views

Is there any difference between “you both will” and “you will both”? [duplicate]

For example, are both of the following sentences correct: If it is cold out, you both will need a coat. If it is cold out, you will both need a coat. And do they mean the same thing?
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Clarification about the phrase “within [x] years of the date…”

Does the phrase "within [x] years of the date..." mean before or after (or both?) the specified date? For example, in the phrase, "GRE scores taken within 5 years of the date application was received,"...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

What's the correct syntax to use for this adjective

So I have biscuits which are made from cow's milk and the milk used in it is unadulterated and pure. Which of these usages convey the above correctly? 1st: Biscuits made from pure cow's milk. ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

WH-movement with complex sentences

I'm editing a biography in which the author, who isn't a native English speaker, stated the following: I started a business at the age of 21 and had no idea what were the most important skills I ...
1
vote
1answer
241 views

“Bent 90 degrees” or “at 90 degrees”?

The metal bar was straight. But I bent it to make a right (90 degrees) angle. Can I say it as below? The metal bar was bent 90 degrees. (90 degree / at 90 degree / to 90 degree) 90 degree / degrees ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Suffix corresponding to an idea described with two nouns

Please pardon my lack of understanding for major English Language concepts, I'll be using layman's terms. Now, I've encountered this issue in the past while writing. Consider this text: That was ...
7
votes
1answer
169 views

When did “our” stop being used as an adjective (as in “other our dominions”, “any our Subjects”)?

While reading a letter written by Queen Elizabeth I of England in 1588, I came across a certain construction that doesn't seem to be grammatical in English: RIGHT trustie, and righte welbelovid ...
1
vote
2answers
58 views

Difference between the two similar senses of about as a preposition

Oxford Living Dictionaries defines the preposition about in sense 2 and 3 that are quite similar; their similarity disabled me contradict between such senses. Sense 2. [British] Used to indicate ...
1
vote
2answers
521 views

“Sending off a balloon”: verb or noun?

Agnes suggested sending off a balloon with a message to Jenny. The phrase sending off puzzles me. I know it’s a verb phrase, but I don’t understand why it ends on -ing. Is it a noun or a verb? I've ...
1
vote
3answers
227 views

Should I use a hyphen, an en dash, or an em dash to define or introduce a word? [closed]

I have looked up online and studied usages for the hyphen, en dash, and em dash. I still haven't found an answer if I can define words with a dash in English. The backstory on dashes defining ...
1
vote
0answers
143 views

What verbs in English never take nouns as complements, and is there a term for this?

I can think of only a few verbs like exist and belong that never take ordinary nouns as object complements. (see below) We never say things like, *She exists a doctor. Rather, we would say, She ...
0
votes
1answer
381 views

Are the following sentences grammatically correct?

I'm having some troubles with a more literary writing style, and I wanted to check if the following sentences are correct grammatically, and if not, what exactly is the problem and what alternatives ...
2
votes
1answer
43 views

“all [object]'s [properties]” vs “[object]'s all [properties]”

Which form is correct and why? "all [object]'s [properties]" OR "[object]'s all [properties]" Here's an example: In order to use all the machine's available cores. In order to use the machine's all ...
1
vote
1answer
30 views

Two adverbs, and an indefinite article

I found two adverbs, between which indefinite article, in TVTRopes site: Upon reading it, the host concludes that it's actually a really old joke that everyone knows. Is it grammatical to ...
3
votes
2answers
87 views

Is “The Dad is fishing” acceptable?

Is there something wrong with this sentence? The Dad is fishing. In my opinion. It sounds wrong using Dad as the subject. This is the context: A student was given the task to make a declarative ...