Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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Pretended not to hear or pretended to not hear? [duplicate]

I'm trying to understand whether the two sentences are the same or are they different? 1. She pretended not to hear... 2. She pretended to not hear... Personally, I prefer the second choice but I ...
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64 views

Omit “while” before -ing form

Can I omit "while" before -ing form? Are these two the same in terms of meaning? I think while walking. I think walking. I can see a problem with different verbs: I learn while walking. I learn ...
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2answers
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In this sentence with multiple negations, should I use “is” or “isn't”?

My apologies, I’m having issues with a double negative sentence. Bear in mind I don't want to change the sentence structure around, I just want to know if at the end of the sentence, I should put the ...
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1answer
61 views

What part of speech is the word hair in 'hair spray'? [duplicate]

Consider the following sentence as an example. I used some hair spray. What part of speech is hair? Intuitively, I want to say it's an adjective modifying spray since hair spray is two separate words ...
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3answers
142 views

Is “know not” grammatically correct? [closed]

I've just seen someone comment: We send our children to fight in a war we know not what we are fighting for. I am not English expert (it's not even my first language) but the structure just seems ...
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586 views

Is “that which” grammatical in the sentence “I have that which I should have told you summers ago”, and if so, how?

This is my first question although I have been reading you for a long time. My question is: can that which be used with the meaning of something? For me, that is a demonstrative pronoun, so you can ...
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1answer
171 views

“… takes as input …” vs “… takes input as …”

Why did the author place "as" between the verb take and the preposition here? Give an efficient algorithm that takes as input a desired accuracy ϵ > 0 and returns a simple cycle C for which r(C)≥ r*...
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2answers
870 views

'In which' or 'where'?

Which case is correct? I'm writing like some kind of fanfiction, but I really want to know and get better in grammar. "He had been unable to sleep well the night before to the morning where he had ...
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138 views

Imperative sentence patterns …

Please let me ask you native or very well-trained Eglish speakers if there’s some patterns, rules, or formulas in regards of an imperative sentence’s structure. For example, I was reading this ...
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1answer
65 views

What is the grammatical name and function of this sentence

...which eventually develop into cacoons.. The full sentence is: According to researchers, the silkworm (which eventually develop into cacoons) from which raw silk is produced do well in warm ...
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2answers
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Questions on usage of 'as' in the following sentence: “Maybe Andrew Jackson was as impetuous, maybe Richard M. Nixon as venal.”

While reading an article, I found a sentence of which I couldn't get the exact meaning, which was: It is difficult, at the moment, to fully assess the damage Trump is wreaking. We have never had a ...
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Omitting Which / That in a Sentence

The following sentence is from Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. I'm wondering if it's correct and what it means: “Give me a couple of dates are good for you.” Shouldn't it be “Give me a ...
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1answer
52 views

CaGEL equivalent to obligatory adverbial?

When I learnt grammar in school, I was taught that there are optional and obligatory adverbials. Trying to understand grammar in the form presented by Huddleston and Pullum (e.g. the Cambridge Grammar ...
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3answers
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Are these PPs or non-finite clauses – or something else entirely?

I'm wondering about the construction for [NP] to [VP], as illustrated in the following examples: (1) I waited for you to come here (2) He arranged for me to go there (3) For him to do that took ...
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Phrasing a question to me in this way - why is it rude ? Or is it rude?

I am a junior in sales office. I have not been here long. A senior colleague of mine will often ask me to read correspondence that he has drafted. On the whole it is an easy task requiring not much ...
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Can a PP be analysed as a complex adjective?

In the sentence They are more familiar with this, the predicative complement more familiar with this is an AdjP, with the adjective head familiar. But what about a sentence such as They are more at ...
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1answer
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Is this sentence correct? - “Every one of them could not solve it.”

Thank you for checking out my question. Even though I asked a similar question earlier, another confounding issue showed up here. Is this sentence grammatically correct or, at least, acceptable? ...
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2answers
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What's that you say? [Syntactic role of 'you say']

An opinion article titled "Mattel and Margot Robbie's Barbie movie is not the film 2019 needs" has this passage: Yet I don't think Mattel gives a tinker's cuss whether we're hating on Barbie or ...
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Is “The cat paws in the water to get the fish” a grammatically correct sentence? [closed]

Is this sentence, "The cat paws in the water to get the fish" grammatically correct?
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1answer
65 views

How to use “is prohibitive” in a sentence?

Which of the following sentences is correct? Should I use "to" or "for"? Unfortunately, the cost for an attorney is prohibitive to me as a university student. Unfortunately, the cost for an ...
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1answer
75 views

Does the word “function” in this sentence make grammatical sense?

Sorry if this is a dumb question, but I honestly just want to confirm something and I need people who understand English grammar better than myself to help me out here to see if this makes grammatical ...
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3answers
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Comparing negatives (It is nice not to be rude.) vs. (It isn't nice to be rude.) [duplicate]

What is the difference in style and meaning between the following two in terms of the adjective "nice"? (It is nice not to be rude.) (It isn't nice to be rude.) besides, what is the difference in ...
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2answers
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“It's ok to somebody” sentence structure

I corrected a student as she had made the sentence "it's ok to Martin". I know that this sentence structure is incorrect, she asked why I had made the correction and I am having difficulty explaining ...
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usage and meaning of attribute after a noun [duplicate]

Suppose there is a cat ,a mouse and a table in a room, while the cat is watching the mouse. [Q1] What does "the cat is watching the mouse on the ground" mean? Are both the cat and the mouse on the ...
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3answers
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Double negative in this sentence?

I am wondering whether the following sentence contains a double negative: Contrary to popular belief, home values don’t depend on material alone but rather the efficiency of those materials in ...
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Extraposition -examples

a. Some guy with red hair was there. b. Some guy was there with red hair. Do both these sentences express the same meaning? I saw it in Wikipedia as examples of extraposition.
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Can I say my name by using “this is” structure [duplicate]

Ex: This is John. Is it correct way to say my name?? This doubt has arisen when my friend told that "This is" structure is only used to specify about a thing not a person.
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64 views

The king wanted him killed VS The king wanted him to be killed [duplicate]

Do the following sentences mean the same thing or are they different? The king wanted him killed. The king wanted him to be killed. Please use examples to explain the differentiations.
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1answer
33 views

“You've said so time and again” [closed]

I have come accross an unusual to me form of sentence from "The curious Savage": "You’ve got me in such a state, I can’t think. I haven’t a brain in my head, anyhow—you’ve said so time and again.". ...
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5answers
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Can I write “You must not sit when your superior is not”?

I’m trying to shorten some of the sentences in my work and this sentence came across: “You must not sit when your superior is standing.” Is it grammatically correct to substitute with: “You must ...
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1answer
188 views

How to use passive voice in a sentence? [duplicate]

And as he ate it, she looked at him steadily. In this sort of grammatical constructions, "she" works as a subject of the sentence with active voice. Now, consider a sentence which I read in The ...
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Help identifying clasuses, sentence structure

I'm a first time poster, so please let me know if I am posting in the wrong place! I am trying to break down the sentence structure of this sentence. Specifically, how commas are used in the following ...
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2answers
340 views

Opposite of 'Lion's share'

I am writing one proposal for one of the funding agency and I want to write some sentence which conveys following sentiment Although my contribution to this field will be small and not huge ...
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1answer
102 views

For the linguists among us: I like loud singing vs I like singing loudly

Can you explain why using "loud" as either an adjective or an adverb changes the meaning of the sentence. Is it just an English convention, or is there something deeper going on? I like loud singing =...
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Does a ver­bal noun turn back into a verb when mod­ified by an ad­verb? [duplicate]

Here singing is a noun: I like singing. But what about here? I like singing loudly. Loudly is still an ad­verb, right? But singing is still be­hav­ing like a noun, right? So which is it, a noun ...
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Can I use “believe to be” [duplicate]

I was wondering if I could use "believe..." to be in this sentence. To me it sounds a bit overblown, but as I am not a native speaker, I was wondering if you would have any feedback on it: More ...
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1answer
63 views

Get a message *that*? [closed]

My father has got a message that he had received 50000rs. Is this sentence meaningful or not?? Can I use "he had received 50,000rs" after "that"? If not, please send me the correct alternative ...
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2answers
139 views

The sentence : I don’t … no

I have a problem understanding the need for the word “no” in sentences like : I don’t eat no meat. - I don’t smell no dinner cooking. ... Why would we need to add “no” if we already have “Don’t” in ...
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2answers
140 views

Two consecutive sentences that begin with in

I start off two sentences with "in" and it really irks me. Is this okay, does it sound bad? Any recommendations on how to reword the beginning of my sentences would be appreciated. "In response to ...
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1answer
259 views

Here you are or here it is

In an interview I heard " Examiner: May I see your passport please ? Student: Yes, here you are. " Why wasn't the answer ', Yes, here it is. '? Is the full version of the answer " Yes, here you are ...
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2answers
130 views

Make sleep or get someone sleep [closed]

How can I rephrase "I made the child sleep" without the word ' make' ?
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1answer
92 views

Is it correct to use the word “ learn” in this sentence or better to use “ teach”? [duplicate]

"Animal learn us to never give up " , Or better to say "Animal teach us to never give up" ?
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1answer
30 views

Sentence structure with adverbial

Consider these sentences: They are good. They are working. They are eating lunch. In first sentence are is a linking verb, and good is an adjective; so it has the form S+V+C (Subject + Verb + ...
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Why do people say “I have known someone to do” but not “I know someone to do”?

The structure I have known someone to do something is apparently considered grammatical and idiomatic. Examples from Google: I have known people to take shops, put in a few articles and, without ...
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1answer
57 views

Sentence correction - formal [closed]

What will your office hours be next week? or What are your office hours next week? Which one is correct?
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1answer
52 views

Which construction is more cormmon?

I know my question may seem silly to native speakers, but l am really interested in knowing which construction is more common in everyday speech: He is married and has two sons. He is married, with ...
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1answer
32 views

Reordering a complex sentence without changing its meaning

I came across this sentence while watching a TV show on time travel: I want you to go and see me when I was a sophomore in high school. In this, the speaker is asking somebody to go back in time....
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41 views

Help with Sentence Structure and Grammar

The following Federal dispatch case requested did not qualify for an automated dispatch creation. Please create the dispatch manually.
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3answers
88 views

Is it acceptable to start a sentence with an adverb of frequency?

Daily the company sells millions of chocolate bars. The sentence sounds really odd to me but is it wrong?
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492 views

How do you write the opposite of a statement?

For instance: "I am joyful." Is the opposite "I am miserable," or "I'm not miserable"? The opposite of "I am" is "I'm not" or even "you aren't", and the opposite of "joyful" is "miserable". When ...