Questions tagged [syntactic-analysis]

Parsing or syntactic analysis is the process of analysing a string of symbols, conforming to the rules of a formal grammar.

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1answer
62 views

Is the phrase "as I imagined would be the case" grammatically correct and why? [duplicate]

I had the following sentence in mind: "The conflict escalated quite rapidly, as I imagined/predicted would be the case". To my ears, the sentence sounds good, and a moderate amount of people ...
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3answers
209 views

Is "where" the only relative pronoun that cannot be omitted from an adjective clause?

When using adjective clauses, the relative pronoun can be omitted when it is not the subject of the sentence. For example: "She is the person I ran into." In the above example, being the ...
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2answers
110 views

Grammar rule: ONE sentence; ONE subject, ONE predicate. Is it?

I just watched a video on grammar (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Drv6jD8xWdw) that states that English sentences can only have one subject. At first, I thought it was obvious, but then I thought of ...
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28 views

What are parts of writing like "statement", "assertion", "argument", "hypothesis", etc collectively called?

Consider the following made up paragraph Suppose I give you a word, any word. Would you be able to make sense of it? Is it even possible to make sense of a word without surrounding context? I do not ...
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1answer
114 views

NPs containing double genitives: "this harassment of her of yours"

I am interested in which nominal phrases of the general form Article + Noun + of + Accusative pronoun + of + Genitive pronoun sound more or less grammatical to most speakers. Primarily, what ...
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30 views

Is it necessary to append a comma before the coordinate conjunction "or" here?

Here's my initial attempt at formulating this sentence in a grammatically correct manner: I can't tell if I should be insulted by this recommendation because of what I think the YouTube algorithm's ...
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1answer
54 views

Confused about 'What she likes I like that.'

Let's look at the sentence : I like what she likes. This is a correct sentence. Here 'what she likes' acts as object of the verb like and it is a noun clause. So we can consider the above sentence as ...
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3answers
50 views

"They told each other they had better leave" [reciprocity and distributivity]

Following the lead of Higginbotham (1985), Andrew Barss (1986) notes that examples like (1) are ambiguous. (1a) They told each other they had better leave (1b) John and Bill told each other they had ...
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1answer
80 views

I was not directly involved vs I had not directly involved vs I did not directly involve?

Could you please help me to understand the context of these three phrases and where they can be used? I was not directly involved with ... I had not directly involved with ... I did not directly ...
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0answers
22 views

Need help parsing two sentences

For work, I need to pass a parsing test, but I'm very confused. Here are the examples I was given of how to do it: We / have searched / far and wide / for / real-world / video content. Selecting / a ...
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23 views

Using "be" as it is, Whats difference between I be ving, I am ving

I've seen sometimes this structure, "I be doing that" or " We be balling" What is the difference with " ı am doing that", " We are balling" You can correct my ...
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1answer
57 views

What is 'seven-headed bull' in the dialogue between King and Queen? [closed]

The following is an excerpt from the First Act (The Princess and the Woodcutter) of Make Believe, a play for children, written by A. A. Milne in 1918. Could someone help me understand this play ...
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2answers
57 views

What is the difference in meaning when we use a gerund instead of a bare infinitive after the preposition "to"? [closed]

Example: "I devoted so much time to learning this skill." And "I devoted so much time to learn this skill."
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0answers
58 views

"The number of Xs" - why no article?

Looking at Why not add ‘the’ before the last ‘steps’ word? as recently asked on ELL, I was struck by the realisation that it's very difficult to find contexts where we would include both articles in ...
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0answers
52 views

How to interpret each word in "so as to" separately?

I already know the whole phrase so as to means in order to. but still a bit curious about how to interpret each word in this phrase separately. can I interpret the following sentence like this? He ...
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1answer
127 views

What does it mean: A utility hookup or work order dated within 60 days before registration? [duplicate]

Does it mean any day in a timeframe of 60 days max to the action, in other words: it could be 1 day or 59 days before?
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1answer
64 views

Non-standard English to Standard English, in Milne's Ugly Duckling

The following is from Ugly Duckling written (a play, 1941) by A. A. Milne. I cannot understand Dulcibella's speech which seems to me non-standard. In this play Dulcibella is depicted as a very ...
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2answers
96 views

What grammatical roles do infinitives and participles assume when used predicatively?

A non-academic grammar site I was reading says: A linking verb will always be completed by an adjective (a predicate adjective) or a noun (a predicate nominative). ... A linking verb can only be ...
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0answers
37 views

What are the subjects, objects, complements and gerunds in this sentence?

As with most great avant artists, it’s easier to describe how Arca makes you feel than what it is, exactly, she makes. Just wanted clarification on a few things. What is the first part of the ...
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138 views

Subordinate conjunction "Just as": different meaning depending on the position in the sentence?

I was searching for sentences with just as in the meaning of "in the same way as". It seems to me that subordinate sentences with just as can either describe 'the way' something is being ...
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1answer
45 views

Is the expression 'asked for a special permission' grammatically correct?

It appeared in an English test for foreign learners recently, where the candidates had to choose the right word to fill in the blank. On the subject of Covid, the question is: Some parents have asked ...
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1answer
237 views

What is the grammatical nature of "wrote" in the phrase "The Wrote and The Writ"? [closed]

In the song The Wrote and the Writ by British singer and songwriter Johnny Flynn, the title uses that phrase which comes from the the last verse of the song: If you're born with a love for the wrote ...
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23 views

Double “that” clauses in one sentence

"You invest time, energy, and read goods like money or stuff that you own that you share." I read an article this morning and got confused with the sentence above. Which word does each that-...
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1answer
41 views

"A series from one to three items" - is it syntactically correct construction?

A compound file name is the file name that consists of multiple descriptive elements, which are separated by connectors. A connector is a series from one to three hyphens. File name: george_lucas--...
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43 views

How is this couplet to be interpreted grammatically?

What follows are two couplets from the final stanza of the poem 'And thou art dead as young and fair' by Lord Byron. I wish to ask how the word 'thus' is being used here. Yet how much less it were to ...
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1answer
631 views

"She had assigned" vs "She has assigned"

Our teacher assigned topics for a class project several weeks ago. Which is the correct sentence to use to convey this to a classmate? Why? She has assigned topics for everyone Or She had assigned ...
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1answer
65 views

Is it grammatically correct to start a sentence with "Not a +noun"?

Is it grammatically correct to start a sentence with "Not a +noun"? For example, "Not a woman held a presidential cabinet position in the US until 1933, when Frances Perkins became ...
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0answers
68 views

what's the grammar structure of "ought to" [duplicate]

I've seen many explanations that just treat ought to as a whole which equals should. but how to explain the function/role of each word separately? for example: I ought to go now. which role does to ...
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0answers
48 views

What is the date today vs What date is today [closed]

What is the difference between What is the date today? and What date is today? I don't understand why the position of the verb "is" changes and what it means
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79 views

Ending a sentence with verb and adjective

What's the term for a sentence that ends with a verb and adjective like the example below? Note that I'm not trying to modify the verb, which would necessitate an adverb, but the subject. Is this a ...
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2answers
373 views

What's the syntactic explanation in "Mistakes are likely to happen":

I'm con­fused about this sen­tence con­struc­tion: Mis­takes are likely to hap­pen. I’ve thought of three pos­si­ble ex­pla­na­tions; are any of them cor­rect? Where likely is an ad­jec­tive act­...
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1answer
31 views

A series of 4 elements, which can be considered as 2 series of 2 elements

Below is a sentence from the manual about naming files that I'm working on. Avoid including words that are clear from the parent path (2011), the file type (presentation), are obvious for some other ...
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41 views

What's the grammatical function of a registered number of units? [duplicate]

Consider this sentence: The damage extended 400 yards either side of the island. Should 400 yards be considered as the object of 'extended', an adverbial of extent, or subject complement to 'the ...
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0answers
43 views

Sentence Structure analysis

'The day we fret about the future is the day we leave our childhood behind.' What type of sentence is it? Complex/Simple?? Kindly explain, Please. Is its structure something like 'The day(when) we ...
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1answer
34 views

In "renders loose talk about a European army ridiculous", what is "ridiculous" modifying?

In this sentence, what does ridiculous modify? Slow progress towards common defence procurement, let alone a shared doctrine, renders loose talk about a European army ridiculous. Source
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16 views

“those which he thinks likeliest to…”

The following is an excerpt from the book "Algorithms to Live By" by Brian Christian. (p. 230) ...; so that each competitor has to pick, not those faces which he himself finds prettiest, but ...
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1answer
40 views

What are the objects and indirect objects in this sentence (if any)

The storage making your home work harder. It's from a furniture advertisement, and I was just wondering how to dissect the complements here. Is it that storage is the subject, making is the verb, ...
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1answer
64 views

Is the "what" necessary in some sentences with the "as <adverb> as <clause>" structure?

Is using "what" before the clause necessary in some sentences with the structure as <adverb> as <clause>? For example, The strawberry milkshake I ordered has twice as much ...
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3answers
39 views

How do I analyze this sentence from John Dyson's "Don't Look Down"?

John Dyson's DON'T LOOK DOWN has a sentence that reads: The cable heaping on the roof, even a vibration from the men inside, could nudge the 2.4-ton cage into free fall. The cable heaping on the ...
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2answers
41 views

Is it incorrect to say number 3 is 'infront of' letter B in "B 3"? considering that front is a position a head of something [closed]

Is it incorrect to say number 3 is 'in front of' letter B in "B 3"? considering that front is a position ahead of something.
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4answers
179 views

Identifying Main and Subordinate clauses

In the sentence: His family and professional life have made him uniquely able to write novels with a family setting which can absorb the conflict between past and present, tradition and novelty, good ...
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0answers
40 views

What are the elements of this clause?

I am unsure whether I am identifying the elements in the following clause correctly. Phobias often originate from traumatic experiences in one's childhood I am parsing this as follows. Element Part ...
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1answer
52 views

using the same pronoun twice in the same sentence?

I was going over this article and I found the structure of this sentence interesting: Mr Trump will never forgive those whom, like Mitch McConnell, the Senate leader, he judges to have failed him by ...
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1answer
60 views

Is this a valid sentence structure, and what is it called?

I have been writing short stories for the last few months, and have a bad habit of overusing certain sentence structures. Now I think I overuse a particular remedy to the original problem. Oh dear. ...
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1answer
70 views

Can you say "paint price" instead of "painting price"?

Is this sentence ok as currently written? The paint price is high. I ask because the free online proofreading service from Grammarly, Inc. tries to change that sentence to The painting price is high,...
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2answers
93 views

Is the "English" in the name of this site an adjective of noun? [duplicate]

Sorry, I cannot parse "English language and usage", at least, a similar phrase in Russian would be ungrammatical.
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1answer
30 views

Problem with 'that' clause

It shames us as a nation that a freedom fighter has to scrape a living singing on the streets in his twilight years. In the above sentence, what is the function of the that clause?? Is [that a ...
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0answers
21 views

Is this usage of three dots okay to complete a sentence in video or carousel?

I'm making a video in which I need a long sentence. But I don't want to place it in same frame. I want half the sentence (even when both halves of the sentences meanings are not clear independently) ...
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1answer
111 views

Can we use the present continuous form to make a general statement?

Considering it is a general statement, which of the following sentences sounds more natural? I watch a lot of English speaking movies, because I'm always trying to improve my English. I watch a lot ...
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37 views

Can the following sentences both be correct meaning different things?

"Ron dedicated his whole life to educating underprivileged children." And "Ron dedicated his whole life to educate underprivileged children." In the first sentence, "to" ...

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